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Mr. Veech
08-13-2016, 09:27 PM
Anyone here interested in Ray Brassier's nihilistic project? I know his book Nihil Unbound (can't italicize) is notoriously obscure, but his ideas reflect Ligotti's own in CATHR.

I guess my question concerns whether or not people here enjoy "Continental" philosophy.

Liam Barden
08-13-2016, 11:49 PM
[AVOID]

Nihil Unbound is an artless septic tank of academic slop.

Nietzsche, Cioran and Bataille are among my top 11 favorite writers As philosophers they're poets and an absolute pleasure to read.

Nick Land's two books Fanged Noumena and The Thirst for Annihilation, Georges Bataille and Virulent Nihilism
(if you can find it) are well worth reading, especially the later if you're interested in Bataille, Nietzsche and Cioran.

Nick Land is also a pretty decent prose stylist a rare trait in academics, although I wouldn't describe Land as "academic."

He's also written a couple of really enjoyable weird fiction / sci-fi stories, Chasm and Phyl - Undhu . . . I'm yet to see anyone at TLO comment on Land's fiction . . .

In regards to Brassier and every other philosophy / humanities academic on this stupid planet [AVOID], they only make it stupider . . .

gveranon
08-14-2016, 04:02 AM
I didn't make it all the way through Nihil Unbound; the academese is indeed forbidding. I still have a copy and may try again someday. It is of some interest to me.

Mr. Veech
08-14-2016, 04:35 PM
[AVOID]

Nihil Unbound is an artless septic tank of academic slop.

Nietzsche, Cioran and Bataille are among my top 11 favorite writers – As philosophers – they're poets and an absolute pleasure to read.

Nick Land's two books – Fanged Noumena and The Thirst for Annihilation, Georges Bataille and Virulent Nihilism
(if you can find it) – are well worth reading, especially the later if you're interested in Bataille, Nietzsche and Cioran.

Nick Land is also a pretty decent prose stylist – a rare trait in academics, although I wouldn't describe Land as "academic."

He's also written a couple of really enjoyable weird fiction / sci-fi stories, Chasm and Phyl - Undhu . . . I'm yet to see anyone at TLO comment on Land's fiction . . .

In regards to Brassier and every other philosophy / humanities academic on this stupid planet [AVOID], they only make it stupider . . .

I can't argue with you there. Brassier doesn't exactly express his ideas in a clear manner. Even the foreward to CATHR is needlessly obscure. However, I have a friend who maintains a loose relation to Brassier himself. From what I've gathered, Brassier isn't fond of NU. He seems to believe his use of Laruelle's work was unnecessary. I think he's more interested in Wilfred Sellars at the moment.

gveranon
08-14-2016, 07:32 PM
However, I have a friend who maintains a loose relation to Brassier himself. From what I've gathered, Brassier isn't fond of NU. He seems to believe his use of Laruelle's work was unnecessary. I think he's more interested in Wilfred Sellars at the moment.

That's interesting. I think I understood what Brassier was doing with Sellars' thought in NU. The discussion of Laruelle was the most incomprehensible part of the book to me.

Frater_Tsalal
08-15-2016, 12:50 AM
I read very little philosophy myself, but last year I did take the time to read every word in Nihil Unbound (mainly because Grant Morrison namechecked it as an influence to his Nameless comic). When I finished with that the very next book I "read" was Selfish, Kim Kardashian's selfie book. I concluded that the Kardashian book evoked an abyss of chilly transcendental nihilism that Brassier's own book couldn't even come close to competing against. Although Nihil Unbound is probably better written, I'd still recommend Selfish over it, if only because you can easily read the latter in one sitting.

xylokopos
08-15-2016, 09:28 AM
Mr. Veech,

here's a couple of threads you might enjoy:

SR/OOO (http://www.ligotti.net/showthread.php?t=9799)

Cyclonopedia (http://www.ligotti.net/showthread.php?t=1903)

I haven't read Nihil Unbound, I'd rather have my toenails pulled than read another theoretical treatise on nihilism.

Parts of Land's Fanged Noumena have high entertainment value, Negarestani gives you interesting dreams [especially if you read him late/tired/after work] and Harman is doing some intereresting work on Lovecraft using his understanding of Heidegger [Harman's understanding, not Lovecraft's, for obvious reasons].

Some of us are trying to figure out a way to get Mainlaender's Philosophy of Redemption and Horstmann's Das Untier translated to English. See here (http://www.ligotti.net/showthread.php?t=9494).

John Gray is another thinker in the not-so-humanist tradition that gets discussed here from time to time, if you run a search you will find multiple threads. Same for all the usual suspects, Cioran, Schopenhauer, etc. There is also a broad thread on philosophy started by Michael relatively recently, here (http://www.ligotti.net/showthread.php?t=9716).

I don't have a lot of time these days, but if you feel like discussing the Gog-Magog Axis and various weaponised verticalities in the monotheistic xerodrome, or Deleuze and Guattari's treatment of Lovecraft or any sort of cyber-occult, numerological, post-Kantian epistemological drama, someone will oblige, we are not savages.

Mr. Veech
08-15-2016, 12:31 PM
I read very little philosophy myself, but last year I did take the time to read every word in Nihil Unbound (mainly because Grant Morrison namechecked it as an influence to his Nameless comic). When I finished with that the very next book I "read" was Selfish, Kim Kardashian's selfie book. I concluded that the Kardashian book evoked an abyss of chilly transcendental nihilism that Brassier's own book couldn't even come close to competing against. Although Nihil Unbound is probably better written, I'd still recommend Selfish over it, if only because you can easily read the latter in one sitting.

I needed this! Your post had me laughing aloud. Thank you.

Mr. Veech
08-15-2016, 12:33 PM
Thank you kindly for the threads.