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Nemonymous
02-10-2009, 05:54 AM
Today, there was a radio report about
a piece of music that has been playing for some while and is due to
last for 639 years:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/today/hi/today/newsid_7880000/7880626.stm (http://news.bbc.co.uk/today/hi/today/newsid_7880000/7880626.stm)
and today the note changed and not due to be changed again for
another year.
There's something very relaxing and global non-crisis about this
concept...
This also relates to the world's first blank story in Nemonymous Two (2002) that I'm still reading.

Odalisque
02-10-2009, 11:09 AM
If the notes only change once a year, the piece of music presumably comprises 639 notes. Played at normal speed (perhaps with several notes per second) it wouldn't last for very long. :confused:

It may be an excessively slowed down piece of music, rather than an excessively long one. :o

And I don't think that a blank story is a story at all. :confused:

Nemonymous
02-10-2009, 11:21 AM
It may be an excessively slowed down piece of music, rather than an excessively long one.

It is actually entitled: As Slow As Possible

And I don't think that a blank story is a story at all.

Whether it is or not, there is something very relaxing about these phenomena - better even than a warming soak in a benign global bath.

By the time they end any crisis will be over. Including one's own death.

Odalisque
02-10-2009, 12:24 PM
I'm wondering how it plays at all. Is it being played by musicians working in relay? What if someone doesn't turn up for their shift on it some time in the next 639 years? Or is it played automatically by some kind of machine? But what sort of machine will keep working for 639 years?

:confused:

Nemonymous
02-10-2009, 12:35 PM
As explained on that link, it's an organ with weights and automatic bellows. Someone needs to change the weights on the pedals when required. So it does require planned human volition but not constant attendance.

Odalisque
02-10-2009, 01:08 PM
So, it is a machine. I have some doubts as to whether:

(a) That it will continue to run for 639 years without servicing (and, indeed, the fitting of replacement parts)

or

(b) That people will continue to change the weights for 639 years

If comes to that, I'd be surprised to know that there will be any people in 639 years. I think we're headed for extinction long before that.

Nemonymous
02-10-2009, 05:26 PM
I've found a website about this music:
http://www.john-cage.halberstadt.de/new/index.php?l=e

Nemonymous
02-10-2009, 06:19 PM
And somene has told me elsewhere about the Long Now Foundation (fascinating in itself) that has a specific page about this music project:
http://blog.longnow.org/2008/10/02/as-slow-as-possible/

G. S. Carnivals
02-10-2009, 08:22 PM
I own a collection of stories by Gardner Dozois written in collaboration with other authors titled Slow Dancing Through Time. :eek:

Nemonymous
02-11-2009, 05:04 AM
I'm told that the Halberstadt organ, when it has finished this project,
will be performing a short encore of 'They're Coming To Take Me Away, Ha Haaa!';.

G. S. Carnivals
02-11-2009, 05:14 AM
Slapping my palm against my forehead, I have just realized that the acronym for Mr. Cage's piece is ASAP... :rolleyes:

Odalisque
02-11-2009, 06:55 AM
There was something about this on last night's television news, including a bit of the sound, and some views of the device that makes it. The business now seems more real for me, but possibly not any less silly. :)

Nemonymous
02-11-2009, 06:58 AM
but possibly not any less silly.


Many an added value doth stem from silliness (or Zeroism).

Odalisque
02-11-2009, 07:13 AM
but possibly not any less silly.


Many an added value doth stem from silliness (or Zeroism).

To up the silliness quotent somewhat, the Pig Latin for "silliness" is "illinesssay". The triple "s" is as silly a thing as one could wish to find. :D