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G. S. Carnivals
04-17-2009, 09:48 PM
Press Release (April 17, 1941): RKO Radio Pictures is proud to announce the production of In a Seaside Town. The film is apapted from "The Troubles of Dr. Thoss" by popular pulp writer Thomas Ligotti. Elisha Cook, Jr. is cast as Alb Indys, a lonely and sleepless artist who wanders the night in his seaside town. Release is scheduled for September 7, 1941.

Russell Nash
04-18-2009, 03:24 AM
I'm going to miss it because I'll be born in 1967. Too bad.

Odalisque
04-18-2009, 04:51 AM
And I missed rubbing shoulders with the glitterati at the world premiere by being born in 1946. Drat!! :mad:

Russell Nash
04-18-2009, 05:15 AM
Now that I think it twice, a strange alternative Universe indeed!!!

How could we have a film adapted by one of Ligotti's stories in 1941, when Ligotti himself was born in 1953??? In this parallel Universe, when was he born?

That makes me think that there is another possibility, even stranger, in which we are reading stories of a writer that wasn't born yet.

starrysothoth
04-18-2009, 05:44 AM
Now that I think it twice, a strange alternative Universe indeed!!!

How could we have a film adapted by one of Ligotti's stories in 1941, when Ligotti himself was born in 1953??? In this parallel Universe, when was he born?

That makes me think that there is another possibility, even stranger, in which we are reading stories of a writer that wasn't born yet.

It could always be H.P. Ligotti. A Ligotti-Lovecraft amalgamation (effectively making Ligotti one of his own literary forefathers) would be a very strange notion indeed.

Russell Nash
08-15-2009, 11:01 PM
GSCarnivals: What proof do we have that the past ever existed?

The only proof we have is that we remember the past, basically through what the past left behind. That's why we know that Armstrong stepped on the moon. Or that JFK was assassinated. But following this idea, what proof do we have that the past is still existing in, perhaps, an alternative universe? We can say that the past already existed, and became the present, and by becoming the present, our NOW, it evolved into us, thus destroying itself. We do have proof that the past seems to have existed, but that it is still existing... I doubt it.

I don't see the past somehow fixed but forever changing. What...? Who knows if Armstrong urinated before stepping on the moon or not? Who knows if JFK before his time was over had coffee for breakfast? Yes, with one or two sugars? Which spoon he used, a plastic one? Thus, our past, the totality of what was our past, is going to be forever unknown. The more we advance towards the future, the less we will know about the past.

If each Universe is contained in a bubble, and each one of them is what we call "instant". Just imagine how much energy the real Universe, the combination of all "instant" Universes, amounts to. Infinite. Our Universe already has an unbelievable amount of energy, that we cannot account for, imagine a sum of infinite bubble Universes. Thus, by Occam's razor, "entities should not be multiplied unnecessarily", we have to suppose that only our Universe, our NOW, exists, and all the others, past and future Universes, conjectured by science fiction writers, are only illusion.

G. S. Carnivals
08-16-2009, 02:58 AM
I'm too drunk to argue serious issues. However, in an alternative universe, Thomas Ligotti was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in the autumn of 1959, just prior to the publication of The Conspiracy Against the Human Race.

Spotbowserfido2
08-16-2009, 11:27 AM
And what are the Quirk Classics? A wish list of titles in an alternative universe. :cool:

Odalisque
08-16-2009, 08:51 PM
My housemate was watching the Woodstock film on television last night. It would be pleasant to imagine the music provided by someone other than all those rubbish hippy bands. In my alternative universe, Daphne & Celeste would definitely be telling them:

U.G.L.Y. you ain't got no alibi -- you're ugly!

How true!

And I think Girls Aloud for the big finale to Woodstock.

How much better than the real thing would that have been?
:D

G. S. Carnivals
08-17-2009, 12:37 AM
My housemate was watching the Woodstock film on television last night. It would be pleasant to imagine the music provided by someone other than all those rubbish hippy bands. In my alternative universe, Daphne & Celeste would definitely be telling them:

U.G.L.Y. you ain't got no alibi -- you're ugly!

How true!

And I think Girls Aloud for the big finale to Woodstock.

How much better than the real thing would that have been?
:D
Pet, you were at Babestock, too? What an awesome coincidence!

Russell Nash
08-17-2009, 03:44 PM
I'm too drunk to argue serious issues. However, in an alternative universe, Thomas Ligotti was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in the autumn of 1959, just prior to the publication of The Conspiracy Against the Human Race.

Days after... What proof do we have that you were drinking?

Empty bottles...? That doesn't prove that they liquid that you drank was contained in it.

You, or you and someone else, remembers having drinking days ago. If it is you alone, it is easy to understand that that is no proof. If it is more than one people remembering the past, then do we have to assume that a certain distribution of voltages among billions of neurons (variable in time) are proof enough? Not really, because much of what we perceive as reality varies from brain to brain. Those people being interrogating are never going to describe the same reality.

"But the event happened, I have a picture (or film) of it." What a photograph proves is that certain photons interacted with a certain medium sensible to light (photographic film). The atoms contained in this film are not even the same, they are not the original atoms, true witnesses of the party. What about the past contained in other than the visible part of the spectrum and not recorded by the film?

Furthermore, what proof do I have that Ligotti was not born in 1910, and was not given the Nobel Prize in 1955? We can check his birth certificate, and what does it prove? That a certain material called graphite struck a certain medium basically made of carbon, called paper. Again, our proof is an indirect one. Was he awarded a Nobel Prize? Again we need witnesses whose only proof would be variable brain voltages, or show a material sensible to visible light only, witnessing billions of atomic interactions, all the time indirect proof.

Isn't is strange that we don't have any "direct" proof that the past ever existed? Why not? I see my computer screen in front of my eyes right now, direct proof, but we have only indirect proof of the past? Why? And always this indirect proof of the past is subjected to consciousness, which is, someone has to be old enough to understand that a signature on a document means proof of someone's birthday, or that that film is a picture of a past event. Not only animals can't, but also creatures gifted with consciousness, like young kids, can't make that cause and effect relationship. Therefore, we have indirect proof only, and this proof has to go through all our neural system for us to understand that the past existed. This complicated process is our only proof. But is this enough proof?

What this only proves is that I am thinking about this dilemma, and that by thinking about it, I exist. Ultimately, it doesn't prove that the past ever existed.

"Open the door again, brothers and sisters, let me in! I want to go back to my beloved residence, located at Dr. Locrian's Asylum."

Odalisque
08-17-2009, 03:50 PM
Pet, you were at Babestock, too? What an awesome coincidence!

Of course, in the Sad Universe in which we were born, Woodstock fell a long way short of Babestock. :(

No wonder we went looking for an Alternative Universe.

Odalisque
08-17-2009, 03:51 PM
I'm too drunk to argue serious issues. However, in an alternative universe, Thomas Ligotti was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in the autumn of 1959, just prior to the publication of The Conspiracy Against the Human Race.

Days after... What proof do we have that you were drinking?

Empty bottles...? That doesn't prove that they liquid that you drank was contained in it.



The proof is that he's always drinking. ;)

Nemonymous
08-17-2009, 03:52 PM
Alberto, you are too close to what I think for comfort!
Well the words tell me that.

Spotbowserfido2
08-17-2009, 07:21 PM
"The truth about any given matter is always desolate or horrible if pursued beyond the point of the practical."

Thomas Ligotti - “We Can Hide from Horror Only in the Heart of Horror: Notes and Aphorisms”

Russell Nash
08-17-2009, 07:42 PM
"The truth about any given matter is always desolate or horrible if pursued beyond the point of the practical."

Thomas Ligotti - “We Can Hide from Horror Only in the Heart of Horror: Notes and Aphorisms”


Could Ligotti explain, what did we gain (from the point of being practical) by considering the Sun and not the Earth as the center of the solar system? We are almost 500 years living on this new paradigm. Do we sleep better...? Are we more healthy...? Our celery, spinach, and broccoli, taste better...? From a practical point of view, we gained nothing, absolutely nothing, thinking about the origin of the Universe, time, space, alternative Universes, nothing. Although Ligotti is right, we accept what our 5 senses (someone has 6?) are telling us that reality is, partially because whatever the truth is, we are not going to gain anything from it. I correct myself on this, "of course, the past existed, I lived it yesterday, who doubts it?". Then, my normality is proved. I'm out again from Dr. Locrian's Asylum.

G. S. Carnivals
08-18-2009, 04:49 AM
Alberto, I introduced the notion of an alternative universe in a spirited (which is to say drunk) sense of fun. I think you may be taking this too seriously.

Odalisque
08-18-2009, 08:05 AM
Alberto, I introduced the notion of an alternative universe in a spirited (which is to say drunk) sense of fun. I think you may be taking this too seriously.

Indeed!

If there's one thing wrong with this site, it's people taking things too seriously. :o

G. S. Carnivals
08-18-2009, 10:27 AM
Random House has announced a fiftieth anniversary edition of the bestselling 1960 novel Crampton by Thomas Ligotti and Brandon Trenz. Release is planned for the summer of 2010.

Russell Nash
08-18-2009, 11:36 AM
Random House has announced a fiftieth anniversary edition of the bestselling 1960 novel Crampton by Thomas Ligotti and Brandon Trenz. Release is planned for the summer of 2010.

Oh! I see. Then, Random House also announced a superb release of a million hardcover copies of Ligotti's Gothic Tales, promising a photograph of him as well, but which I cannot understand is the date release, they say "by the end of eternity".

Russell Nash
08-31-2009, 01:31 PM
WASHINGTON POST, March, 23, 2010

TACHYONS (particles that move faster than the speed of light) finally discovered at CERN. This discovery may open a door to build a Time Machine.

Nemonymous
08-31-2009, 02:14 PM
WASHINGTON POST, March, 23, 2010

TACHYONS (particles that move faster than the speed of light) finally discovered at CERN. This discovery may open a door to build a Time Machine.


That's jolly good news.
des

Cern Zoo (http://weirdmonger.blog-city.com/the_cern_zoo_page.htm)

G. S. Carnivals
08-31-2009, 04:16 PM
WASHINGTON POST, March, 23, 2010

TACHYONS (particles that move faster than the speed of light) finally discovered at CERN. This discovery may open a door to build a Time Machine.


That's jolly good news.
des

Cern Zoo (http://weirdmonger.blog-city.com/the_cern_zoo_page.htm)
Perhaps going back over and over might afford a way to cheat death. Probably not, alas. :eek:, :eek:, and :eek: (Eeks posted in 1066, 1492, and 1776, respectively)!

Russell Nash
08-31-2009, 05:38 PM
I was surprised yesterday after reading that this year scientists found two new particles, that don't fit anywhere in our standard atomic model, and that their description of what they probably are, is sci-fi other than science.

Y(4140)
New Particle Throws Monkeywrench in Particle Physics | Universe Today (http://www.universetoday.com/2009/03/18/new-particle-throws-monkeywrench-in-particle-physics/)
Fermilab | Press Room | Images (http://www.fnal.gov/pub/presspass/press_releases/Y-particle-20090318-images.html)
Strange Particle Created; May Rewrite How Matters Made (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2009/03/090320-new-particle.html)

The other one is X(4260) or X(something)

Russell Nash
08-31-2009, 06:03 PM
In fact, since I asked the question for the first time, before knowing the existence of a Higgs particle, I wonder why particles (our world in general) have mass. The answer is because they interact with the Higgs particle. Well, Hawking just said, it is going to be much more interesting in physics if such a strange particle is not discovered. What then? We don't have any idea of what to do next. And, even better, if through CERN we discovered new particles not predicted by the model. By the way, I never liked the idea of the quark model. Did anybody understand it? For me it's Chinese (language I don't speak).