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View Full Version : Madness Vs. Ignorance (anti heavy metal I suppose)


Julian Karswell
05-12-2009, 09:15 PM
Many heavy metal bands equate madness with a crazily wild happily irresponsible opt-out-of-life type mentality - akin to a cost-free drug trip for life - when in reality madness must be tortuous even in moderation.

For me, this is one of the most heinous [I]naivetes of youth. A gloom of hashed-up teenage Goths spot a tramp babbling to the crows in the park and think he must be living an unfettered life of exciting abandon; a thuggery of football fans spot a tattooed man in an alleyway headbutting a brick wall until he passes out and nudge each other wryly about the grim scoreline; an exhausted middle-aged spinster stares in a deranged fashion at the electrified railway line by way of delaying returning home to her demanding parents as mischevious children contemplate throwing stones as the mad muttering lady; yet shallow rock stars and equally shallow horror film directors gloat about the sado-psychotic visuals that such scenarios offer.

I grew up in an old peoples' home and I have regular contact with a reasonably large number of "mad" children. Madness is anything but glamorous and it annoys me intensely when writers and directors seek to portray it as exciting or sexy. I truly believe that believing yourself sane in a world of madness is the ultimate vanity.

I like _some_ of the Batman myth. But some of it - especially relating to some of the comic book interpretations of The Joker - are irresponsible (though other graphic novels are far, far worse).

[Immodest digression perhaps, but my daughter & her friends say I can impersonate Heath Ledger's recent portrayal with frightening accuracy.]

Anyway - madness. I like and approve of the way that "madness" is handled by Charles Dickens and Wilkie Collins - they acknowledged that madness is a illness, one to be respected, but also one that can be manipulated - but I thoroughly disapprove when sane writers or artists "play" with madness as if it were some some fashionable affectation that can be swept aside. Nor are mad people bestial demons ripe for artistic experimentation and sadistic abuse - they are ill people who merit respect, empathy and dignity.

There's a pretty decent BBC Stephen Poliakoff play called 'Shooting The Past' which features as a sub-plot the tracing back in time of an alcoholic tramp. The viewer is initially confronted with photos of an ugly, red-faced woman in her fifties screaming abuse at a photographer; then a diligent rsearcher sifts through tens of thousands of old photographs to chart her life backwards. He discovers that originally she was a little girl separated from her parents in WW2; they were sent to the gas chambers, she was smuggled out to England, where she spent her life living in care homes before drifting into prostitution.

Of course she ended up "mad". But should she be pitied, or derided?

Mr. D.
05-12-2009, 11:21 PM
Thanks for the insights. Do you think that you may be asking too much of most rockers and horror film directors? I personally would never expect much compassion or understanding from the average rocker and I have had over a decade's worth of experience as a screenwriter in Hollywood. The reasons that most Hollywood films are brainless are just what you would expect; cynicism and stupidity. Scum rises in this world.

Odalisque
05-13-2009, 06:39 AM
Having spent some time, in my younger days, as an inmate of mental hospitals (and thus having seen madness from the inside) I don't believe that it's at all as most people probably suppose. Crazy as my fellow inmates behaviour was in the outside world, once in the mental hospital it was (in most cases) very carefully controlled -- designed to produce the desired responses from psychiatrists and nurses. (Continuation or change of medication, discharge, continued incarceration, or whatever.) Behaviour was most controlled on the locked ward where I once spent a short time (short because I manipulated the psychiatrist for a discharge). I'm not saying that I and my fellows weren't (in some significant sense) mad. But that madness was not as most people probably suppose.

Also, I have a problem with regarding madness as an illness. I really don't think that (in any significant sense) it is.

Julian Karswell
05-13-2009, 12:01 PM
Also, I have a problem with regarding madness as an illness. I really don't think that (in any significant sense) it is.

Well, I do see your point, but clinicians would argue (I suppose) that deviation from the norm signifies mental ill health. Personally I don't have problems with such words and terms but unfortunately many develop a perjorative meaning. For example, I am happy with the concepts of retarded development and spastic reactions, but I abhor the use of the words 'spastic' or 'retard' when used as insults.

It's interesting that we (we as in a society) worry about medical appellations linked to sexual and mental health, but that there are few disagreements over physical ailments. For example, we don't worry about calling a sprained ankle a sprained ankle.

Actually now that I think about it, 'madness' is an odd word and concept. Ditto for 'insanity'. They seem too damning, too extreme, too generalised. I think I prefer the notion of mental ill health since many people with minor or transitory mental health issues are clearly not 'mad'. On those grounds, I think it's reasonable to refer to mental ill health as an illness, much as we'd call a sprained ankle or a common cold illnesses (or 'conditions' at least). I don't think it's offensive to refer to (for example) depression or bi-polar disorder as illnesses but I may well be wrong.

JK

Evans
05-13-2009, 12:41 PM
On those grounds, I think it's reasonable to refer to mental ill health as an illness, much as we'd call a sprained ankle or a common cold illnesses (or 'conditions' at least). I don't think it's offensive to refer to (for example) depression or bi-polar disorder as illnesses but I may well be wrong.

JK

With regards to depression I think its important to define wheather the mood in question is the cause of problems in said person's life or the effects of problems in persons life.

I am very much against the idea that anybody in a depressive frame of mind due to negative circumstances should be labeled in anyway ill. Any more than anybody in a happy frame of mind due to postive circumstances.



Many heavy metal bands equate madness with a crazily wild happily irresponsible opt-out-of-life type mentality - akin to a cost-free drug trip for life - when in reality madness must be tortuous even in moderation.

For me, this is one of the most heinous [I]naivetes of youth. A gloom of hashed-up teenage Goths spot a tramp babbling to the crows in the park and think he must be living an unfettered life of exciting abandon

Allow me to play Devil's Advocate in a way I consider rather apropreate to this forum's

What if this strange tramp who spent time watching talking to unseen parties told the watchers that he did so because he knew knew the true nature of things and the dark irony of mankind's supposed sanity. What if he told them he had glimpsed beyond reality. If we may coin a term from Arthur Machen; what if he told them he'd seen the Great God Pan?

It is easy to call those with strange characteristics and mannerisms mad when they seem not to fully understand or notice these quirks, but it becomes much harder when they are able to explain this things in terms we can not readily grasp.


I feel a piece of butchered Orwell is in order:

All men are mad, yet some men are madder than others.

vegetable theories
05-13-2009, 01:57 PM
I agree that mental illness is often used irresponsibly in much of the horror genre where mad is often equated with bad. Ligotti provides an antidote to this because there is no sane/insane good/evil polarity, rather the whole world is off-kilter and unstable.
I have a strong memory from when I was a kid visiting my foster sister in an asylum. It was one of those big victorian places that have all become redundant. The experience was certainly horrifying, very much like a Chris Mars painting, but that was a childs-eye view.
My dad, I'm sorry to say, was nutty as a fruit-cake and spent a good time in prison for attempted murder, but he was a gentle, isolated, sad man. Not scary at all.

Odalisque
05-13-2009, 02:14 PM
Also, I have a problem with regarding madness as an illness. I really don't think that (in any significant sense) it is.

Well, I do see your point, but clinicians would argue (I suppose) that deviation from the norm signifies mental ill health. Personally I don't have problems with such words and terms but unfortunately many develop a perjorative meaning. For example, I am happy with the concepts of retarded development and spastic reactions, but I abhor the use of the words 'spastic' or 'retard' when used as insults.

It's interesting that we (we as in a society) worry about medical appellations linked to sexual and mental health, but that there are few disagreements over physical ailments. For example, we don't worry about calling a sprained ankle a sprained ankle.

Actually now that I think about it, 'madness' is an odd word and concept. Ditto for 'insanity'. They seem too damning, too extreme, too generalised. I think I prefer the notion of mental ill health since many people with minor or transitory mental health issues are clearly not 'mad'. On those grounds, I think it's reasonable to refer to mental ill health as an illness, much as we'd call a sprained ankle or a common cold illnesses (or 'conditions' at least). I don't think it's offensive to refer to (for example) depression or bi-polar disorder as illnesses but I may well be wrong.

JK

I don't, precisely, find the term "mental illness" offensive. One of the problems with it seems to me that it is treated as medical, but defined otherwise. Many conditions treated as mental illness are defined by emotional and/or mental states. Others, more in line with term "madness", are defined in terms of behaviour. None of these seem to me to have much in common with true illnesses (such as flu) which are defined in an entirely different way. One time I was in Ridge Lea Hospital (Lancaster) one of my fellow inmates had been incarcerated there for shooting at passers by (from his bedroom window) with a ping pong ball gun. This behaviour seems to me close to the core of what we mean by "madness". I am doubtful whether it has much to do with medicine (although it was treated medically or, rather, pharmaceutically). "Mental illness" seems to cover such a wide range of conditions from marginally problematic levels of depression or anxiety to homicidal craziness. Whether a catch-all term for these is useful is a matter open to doubt. Some of these conditions may be unremarkable responses to a crazy world.

A sprained ankle is not an illness, of course, but an injury.

Ascrobius
05-13-2009, 02:32 PM
Well, while I could write a very lengthy response to this post, I don't have time to because I am at work, so I'll make this brief.
Being a clinician who has worked in psychiatric environments such as inpatient units, partial hospital programs, outpatient clinics, therapeutic schools, and a number of other settings, simply "deviating from the norm" does not signify mental illness, per se. The level of deviation, if you will, is only significant in as much as it effects one's level of functioning in various domains, i.e., social, emotional, academic, and so forth. When it can be established that there are deficits in one's ability to function, there are diagnostic criteria, as flawed as they might be, that have been developed (and continue, of course, to be developed) that are employed when identifying or ruling out various forms of mental illness. In the diagnostic world, the criteria are contained in the DSM-IV, which again, as flawed and as incomplete as it may be, is what we use. That being said, simply having strange, bizarre, or otherwise idiosyncratic thoughts does not make one "mentally ill", as it were. If that were the case, there would be far more people involved in the treatment world than there already are. Then again, there are many people that fly under the radar, if you will, and while they may act strangely or think highly unusual thoughts that might be a manifestation of some "pathological" condition, they may be functional enough that they never seek or are forced into treatment because their behavior hasn't necessarily warranted such interventions.
Tim

unknown
05-13-2009, 03:00 PM
As a former writer for Ultimatemetal.com, one of the largest metal communities on the web, I'm not sure I entirely agree with the statement of heavy metal bands using madness...at least that's not how it is now. Perhaps in the 80s and 70s (Alice Cooper and numerous thrash and speed acts come to mind), yes, I would agree madness was sort of patronized, but now within the last fifteen years, heavy metal largely focuses on spiritual, philosophical, natural and nationalistic elements. As far as the naivete of youth, I won't doubt or dispel that many children are naive, but I don't know about their fascination with mental illness...perhaps I've just been in college too long. I don't know

G. S. Carnivals
05-14-2009, 12:10 AM
I believed that I was going mad when I was seventeen or eighteen. I was using drugs, and was inhaling as much marijuana smoke as I could get my lips around. At the time, (between high school and college in 1975) I experienced a genuine rush of existential awareness. It was too much, and I thought "the center cannot hold" for very long. I even visited my father's psychiatrist on one occasion. I realized pretty quickly that I couldn't follow in my father's footsteps without being hospitalized (as he had been off and on because of psychiatric issues since 1966). I further immersed myself in drug and alcohol abuse and somehow emerged more or less "normal" after my initial trauma. I only abuse alcohol today. I require no further medication. Am I normal now?

Bleak&Icy
05-14-2009, 01:34 AM
Am I normal now?

The fifth major revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is currently in preparation and is due to be published in 2012. The DSM V will feature a previously undiagnosed condition known as Quirk Classic Craziness.

Individuals suffering from this terrible illness feel an overwhelming compulsion to create fictive literary titles from hybrid sources. In mild cases, sufferers are often able to function in society, and many are capable of maintaining human relationships. But significant problems may arise when sufferers "elect" a domestic animal, usually a dog or cat, to create fictive titles on their behalf. In advanced cases a potentially dangerous development occurs when an individual suffering from Quirk Classic Craziness believes that his or her own personality is subservient to his or her own brilliant, witty but ultimately fictional animal. ;)

trieffiewiles
05-14-2009, 02:01 AM
Madness/insanity are usually defined vaguely at best, as being the opposite of reason. Reason itself seems to be a very narrow and restrictive thing going by any husk of a Merriam-Webster definition.

I know of a gas station wherein, whenever I go, I am always greeted by a simple 40-something man loitering by the door in the same old and tattered shirt. He will always say Hi buddy how are you , laugh and nod his head erratically, and, a minute later having forgotten what he had just said, repeat it. Sadly, he is homeless.

No one regards his behavior as reasonable. Should he therefore be automatically associated with any old suicidal burn-out whose buddies shoot smack through cattle syringes into each of his arms while he jerks them off simultaneously? I am not inclined to think so, he has certainly never brought any pain into my life, and I couldn't picture him in a scenario as colorful as the one I just mentioned. Undoubtedly though, any shrink would diagnose him with some bull#### psychological ailment or another.

Madness has never had a clear definition, and I don't believe I have ever met a truly 'sane' and idealized person in my life. There are always extreme examples, but one cannot elimate all things for which there are extreme examples of, otherwise nothing would exist at all.

People tend to think all murderers are insane, and since sanity is a perpetually remote ideal in my book, I guess I agree. This doesn't change the fact that some of the most extensive mass murderers in history, were very often calm, clinical, and by all means rational in mind, like your Stalins and what-have-you.

This also doesn't change the fact that some of the wildest and most inhibited of psychopaths have so obviously enjoyed every ounce of depravity they've inflicted upon the 'innocent' and otherwise. Surely madness is not necessarily painful or unpleasant to those experiencing it. Nor must the insane obey the Merriam-Webster and harass the .001% of sane people left in the world.

I think any genre of music can be just about anything in someone's mind. I love a lot of metal, and I hate even more of it. Really though, anything that isn't light jazz could probably be charged with endorsing crazy behavior, whatever that means, dancing perhaps. Hell, any room full of dancing people, unless its a bunch of dervishes or something similar, usually scares the #### of me. One might as well charge all exciting jazz with promoting psychedelic drug abuse, and all music with acoustic stringed intruments with inciting inbreeding and moonshining.

Julian Karswell
05-14-2009, 06:34 AM
I believed that I was going mad when I was seventeen or eighteen. I was using drugs, and was inhaling as much marijuana smoke as I could get my lips around. At the time, (between high school and college in 1975) I experienced a genuine rush of existential awareness. It was too much, and I thought "the center cannot hold" for very long. I even visited my father's psychiatrist on one occasion. I realized pretty quickly that I couldn't follow in my father's footsteps without being hospitalized (as he had been off and on because of psychiatric issues since 1966). I further immersed myself in drug and alcohol abuse and somehow emerged more or less "normal" after my initial trauma. I only abuse alcohol today. I require no further medication. Am I normal now?

Undoubtedly dope induces paranoia. My initial experiences of it were euphoric; then I became used to it and would have to upgrade to opiated hash to elicit a similar feeling; then slowly but surely, apathy and paranoia set in. At first you wear dark sunglasses to conceal the fact that your pupils are dilated, later you wear them because you are terrified that people are staring at you.

But stop smoking dope and the symptoms vanish within a couple of weeks. I've chatted about this with a couple of doctors - not as a patient, I mean doctors who are friends - and they say it has something to do with chemical reactions in the brain.

That glimpse into paranoia was both enlightening and terrifying. People who live with paranoid schizophrenia on a daily basis must lead a truly hellish, tortuous experience. Perversely, I'm very interested in fiction in which features the imposition of paranoia on the individual. Many despotic regimes and cruel people seek to dominate the masses or perceived threats by creating a false reality in which the victim is targeted and subjugated, with paranoia playing a key role.

In 'I984' Big Brother is always watching you; in 'The Invasion Of The Body Snatchers' the individual is quite literally replaced by a sinisterly compliant doppelganger; in 'The Sound Of His Horn' and 'Planet Of The Apes' detractors are hunted like animals, causing a defensive bestial regression; in Kafka's 'The Trial', the individual is driven to the brink of paranoid insanity; etc etc.

Paraonoia is frightening and unprincipled parties like to use fear as a weapon. Many horror stories rely upon individual, single perspective accounts of paranoia, but for a novel to succeed, I think that the paranoia needs to be collective. Having said that, 'The Trial' is a brilliant exception to the rule. The pre C20th gothic novel in which a heroine was typically ensnared in a web of paranoid intrigue - for example, 'The Woman In White' or 'Uncle Silas' - was understandably personal because the Establishment itself was very rarely criticised in the way it is now; sure, Dickens and Hogarth depicted failings in social care and financial injustice, but attacking the state was very much the preserve of satirists (who were often scheming politicians themselves). It has only been in response to a better understanding of just how important a science psychology is that we have realised what a key role paranoia has played in warfare, social control and personal relationships.

Ond of the things that most bugs me about politicians and celebrities who cheat, lie or defraud is their attempt to disingenuously manipulate perception. For me this makes the whole issue of paranoia fuzzier.

"I would like to apologise for creating the impression that I had overclaimed 50,000 in expenses" - this is the sort of nonsense politicians churn out by way of apologising for bad behaviour. I think it's a pernicious abuse of the apology. In the old days a politician caught defrauding the public purse would say "I'm sorry I stole the money" and quietly resign. Nowadays they try to cling on to their jobs by pretending that the theft wasn't really a theft - that we are being paranoid for believing it to be so - all couched in a very misleading apology. This refusal to admit wrongdoing is a twisting of the truth and allows the miscreant the opportunity of returning once the dust has settled (look at the case of Peter Mandelson, for example).

Is it any wonder that society and individuals in those societies are becoming more paranoid under such circumstances? And that's to say nothing of DNA databases, CCTV and the monitoring of one's online behaviour.

(Whoops, I've veered off at a wide tangent - it's a conspiracy!)

JK

MadsPLP
05-14-2009, 06:35 AM
As a former writer for Ultimatemetal.com, one of the largest metal communities on the web, I'm not sure I entirely agree with the statement of heavy metal bands using madness...at least that's not how it is now. Perhaps in the 80s and 70s (Alice Cooper and numerous thrash and speed acts come to mind), yes, I would agree madness was sort of patronized, but now within the last fifteen years, heavy metal largely focuses on spiritual, philosophical, natural and nationalistic elements.

The nationalistic elements seem to be confined mainly to sub-genres and sub-genres within sub-genres, but apart from that, I agree.

In the 80'es (mainly that decade), some metal bands have used the term "madness" in a patronizing way, but I doubt it was more or less patronizing than the rest of society's use of that term, although the term seems to have been used more frequently among metal bands.

However, one should probably distinguish between the clinical use of the term, and the usage of it in popular culture which is quite clearly very different from the clinical usage. Metal bands using the term has primarily used the latter, which is a whole different thing.

There is an element of misinterpretation too. Take, for example the lyrics to 'Paranoid' by Black Sabbath, a song often said to "evoke the madness of heavy metal" or whatever:

People think I'm insane because I am frowning all the time
All day long I think of things but nothing seems to satisfy
Think I'll lose my mind if I don't find something to pacify

While not exactly being great literature, the lyrics aren't about madness in its popular usage - it's about the possibility of madness being there, about a loss of reality sense, the reality sense getting undermined by means which the narrator cannot explain, nor understand, almost as there were some outside force deciding to let the narrator lose his sense of reality, though the narrator is not insane, despite other people misinterpretating his behaviour. And that is very different from the "heavy metal madness"-thing.

That is of course just one lyric, but still I believe that the use of the word "madness" in heavy metal isn't as one-dimensional as one may think.

Joel
05-14-2009, 08:40 AM
Overdosing on mind-altering substances is certainly one way of persuading yourself that 'madness' is a visionary or esctatic state experienced by great artists. Reading Romantic poetry and its modern descendants is another. Most heavy metal lyricists are grammar-school boys who read Blake and Coleridge in their formative years Iron Maiden, for example, not only recorded 'Can I Play With Madness' but also a metal version of 'The Rime of the Ancient Mariner'. The acme of the literary romanticisation of madness is probably the following:

Mad As The Mist And Snow

Bolt and bar the shutter,
For the foul winds blow:
Our minds are at their best this night,
And I seem to know
That everything outside us is
Mad as the mist and snow.

Horace there by Homer stands,
Plato stands below,
And here is Tully's open page.
How many years ago
Were you and I unlettered lads
Mad as the mist and snow?

You ask what makes me sigh, old friend,
What makes me shudder so?
I shudder and I sigh to think
That even Cicero
And many-minded Homer were
Mad as the mist and snow.

William Butler Yeats


...which is actually rather good. We find similar sentiments in Kerouac, though Ginsberg knew enough about the downside of madness to present a bleaker picture: "I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked..."

The Channel Islands poet Jeremy Reed, who sees himself as a modern heir to the Romantic tradition, wrote a book about poetry and madness in which he argued that madness is akin to the visionary ecstasy of transcendent art. I don't know whether he also acknowledged the soul-destroying blankness of depression, the monotonous repetition of OCD or the bleak tunnel vision of persecution mania...

The clinical model of madness as mental illness is inclined towards a normative and functional perspective that valorises socially accepted norms and pathologises anything that is different. However, it does create a framework in which people who are suffering can be helped, and that is in itself quite important. Being told "Your alternative visions are way cool, man" is very little help to someone whose inner world is falling apart.

In a very general sense, the most useful perspective is perhaps one that recognises the need of the individual to develop and grow as a whole person, within a community that also needs to embrace diversity and change while helping those who are needlessly in pain. We're a long way from most of that.

Odalisque
05-14-2009, 10:20 AM
I believed that I was going mad when I was seventeen or eighteen. I was using drugs, and was inhaling as much marijuana smoke as I could get my lips around. At the time, (between high school and college in 1975) I experienced a genuine rush of existential awareness. It was too much, and I thought "the center cannot hold" for very long. I even visited my father's psychiatrist on one occasion. I realized pretty quickly that I couldn't follow in my father's footsteps without being hospitalized (as he had been off and on because of psychiatric issues since 1966). I further immersed myself in drug and alcohol abuse and somehow emerged more or less "normal" after my initial trauma. I only abuse alcohol today. I require no further medication. Am I normal now?

In so far as you're holding your life together, you'll pass for "normal" in this sense.

It seems to me that thoughts/behaviour perceived as "mad", and excessive consumption of alcohol/other drugs, may both be reactions to finding oneself in a crazy situation. When people pass from heavy drug use to perceived madness, I think it is common to view the drug consumption as the cause of the craziness. But, it seems to me, that the two are often (rather than cause and effect) reactions to a common cause. (Not that I think that people on the brink of madness are well advised to consume mind altering substances.)

Odalisque
05-14-2009, 10:27 AM
I know of a gas station wherein, whenever I go, I am always greeted by a simple 40-something man loitering by the door in the same old and tattered shirt.

Is there a carnival attached to this gas station? :confused:

Hell, any room full of dancing people, unless its a bunch of dervishes or something similar, usually scares the #### of me.


Personally, a bunch of dervishes (or something similar) would scare me a lot more than an ordinary roomful of dancing people. :eek:

The Black Ferris
05-14-2009, 01:38 PM
I think the most frightening thing about 'going mad' is the loss of control. This is a time tested horror device and one that, in 'reality', we struggle with on a daily basis.
Paranoia is only the fear of the loss of control of the situation, where things you might have trusted can turn on you.
This includes everything from close friends and business situations to full blown government conspiracy.
Especially in this age of pharmacy and cell towers (it just sounds ominous, doesn't it?) it becomes increasingly less difficult to believe that someone could take over your mind or someone's you care about.
And rest assured, there are people who want to control what you think and do.
But what can you do?
Tell your tales and sell your junk.
There is no real fear on the romantic side of madness, because you are in collaboration, somehow, with that force.
But should you listen to me?
After all, I'm a magician. I converse with spirits regularly. I have been an avid marijuana user since I was 13, daily since I was 18.
I don't see it as much stronger than the coffee I drink and I trust it far more than any pharmaceutical on the market for my mental health.
This is due, likely, to my personal chemistry.
I don't drink alcohol, except on occasion, because it inhibits my ability to interact or create and makes me dizzy, which I hate.
I take hallucinogens ritually, believing that their effects actually alert you to senses other than the Holy 5 that the human body, the human mind is equipped with.
Navigation is key. If you can't navigate, you get lost.
I'm having trouble navigating myself away from a real danger in my life...tobacco.
This addiction, I do consider to be a style of madness.
Personal chemistry.
I also view psychiatry as not much more accurate than astrology. There are certain common elements among people of an ilk, but it is much more difficult to account for the path of personal experience.
Anything can become cheesy if it becomes cliche'.
There are posers on every path, telling you that they've been down that way when they haven't.
I wouldn't let that ruin madness for me. It still seems one of the more frightening horror devices. That, and 'ghosts'.

Sin cerely,
The Black Ferris

The Black Ferris
05-14-2009, 02:30 PM
And I'm a tad paranoid of catching Quirk Classic Craziness.

The Black Ferris
05-14-2009, 02:35 PM
Speaking of psychiatry, a friend reading this thread, not a TLO member, thinks we are hilarious and called us the 'Frasier' of the internet.
What is that supposed to mean?

Julian Karswell
05-14-2009, 04:44 PM
Speaking of psychiatry, a friend reading this thread, not a TLO member, thinks we are hilarious and called us the 'Frasier' of the internet.
What is that supposed to mean?

That we are listening, Dr Crane.....!

trieffiewiles
05-14-2009, 06:30 PM
I know of a gas station wherein, whenever I go, I am always greeted by a simple 40-something man loitering by the door in the same old and tattered shirt.

Is there a carnival attached to this gas station? :confused:

Hell, any room full of dancing people, unless its a bunch of dervishes or something similar, usually scares the #### of me.


Personally, a bunch of dervishes (or something similar) would scare me a lot more than an ordinary roomful of dancing people. :eek:

Really. I guess I simply find modern zombies more irritating than the possessed.

Perhaps I am afraid of what isn't interesting, I find a lot of those Northern African/Asian carnival-like spiritual festivals fascinating.

I would initiate a lengthy insult of horrible club music (redundant, I know), and how so many people are dependent on a scene that half of them can't stand as much as I do, because they lack the creativity to get laid any other way, but that has nothing to do with this thread.

Dr. Bantham
05-14-2009, 06:59 PM
Madness has my vote. Any day, any illness.
YouTube - Madness - One Step Beyond

Then again, one could take the concept one step further...
YouTube - Six feet Under - Feasting On The Blood Of The Insane

Odalisque
05-15-2009, 08:09 AM
And I'm a tad paranoid of catching Quirk Classic Craziness.

You should be at least cautious regarding that threat to your mental health. ;)