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bendk
06-02-2009, 03:16 PM
Does anyone besides me have a weakness for old horror pulp fiction? The stories are over-the-top, but the adjective-laden prose does contain a certain charm for those receptive to it. They are the literary equivalent of a B-Movie. In these pages you can read how "A Satanic Spirit Spreads Havoc in an Unholy Campaign of Destruction" or "From the Well of Silence Comes the Mocking Laughter Of a Loathsome Lord of Evil". How can you resist "Abyss of the Wailing Dead", "Hall of Crawling Desire","The Molemen Want Your Eyes", "Debutantes for the Damned", or "I, Satan, Take Thee, Sin Child..". It might not be literature, but it's fun. The cover art contributes a lot to the collectibility of these magazines. The scantily clad women in peril went right for the jugular of the reader demographic.

http://www.coverbrowser.com/image/terror-tales/5-1.jpg (http://www.coverbrowser.com/covers/terror-tales#i5)


http://www.coverbrowser.com/image/spicy-mystery/4-1.jpg (http://www.coverbrowser.com/covers/spicy-mystery#i4)

http://www.sfcovers.net/Magazines/BWM/SMM1_0001.jpg

There are a few publishers that reprint pulp replicas. The best, IMO, is Girasol Collectibles. These are a bit pricey at $25 each (on average) but they have the look and feel of the real thing. They are facsimiles, including all the stories and advertisements.

http://www.girasolcollectables.com/

http://www.adventurehouse.com/

The following site contains many covers photos. My favorites are in the Spicy line, so the link will take you there first, but they also have Weird Tales, Horror Stories, Terror Tales, etc.

http://www.coverbrowser.com/search?q=spicy+mystery&page=2


A good overview of the the Weird Menace pulps can be found in the book The Shudder Pulps by Robert Kenneth Jones. (This doesn't cover Weird Tales). The hardcover edition is shown here.

http://i.ebayimg.com/04/!BSVb31!BGk~$(KGrHgoH-DQEjlLlu3hQBKCr04hWcQ~~_1.JPG

G. S. Carnivals
06-02-2009, 08:29 PM
I have never collected actual pulp magazines, but I have compensated somewhat. I own a wonderful coffee table book called The Pulps: Fifty Years of American Pop Culture which was compiled and edited by Tony Goodstone. It reprints many pieces of fiction in facsimile format which is great because one is treated to the original visual appearance of the works including illustrations, blurbs, and even vintage advertising. The book covers the pulp genres of Adventure, Sports, Aviation and War, Western and Frontier, Detective and Mystery, Innocence, Sex, Supernatural, Science Fiction, and Heroes. The Pulps also presents several pages of color cover plates representing the various genre magazines. I highly recommend this book.

Two other pulp facsimile books I own are Hard-Boiled Dames edited by Bernard Drew and Secret of the Earth Star which features pulp science fiction by Henry Kuttner (Starmont House, 1991). Weird Tales: 32 Unearthed Terrors edited by Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Robert Weinberg, and Martin H. Greenberg at least reproduces original story artwork and blurbs.

I also own several other anthologies devoted specifically to pulp-era fiction in the weird, science fiction, and crime genres. I wax nostalgic for a bygone era I never lived through, alas.

Odalisque
06-02-2009, 08:53 PM
I have a small collection of old issues of Weird Tales. There's something about the crumbly yellowing paper of the originals... the smell of them... the feel of them upon my fingers... all amounting to something rather wonderful... something that reprints don't capture. Most of the stories are rubbish, of course, but there's something wonderful about them, too. Reprints seek to reproduce only the best, which is all very well, but not the full pulp experience.

Joel
06-03-2009, 07:38 PM
I used to collect some 1940s pulps (especially Weird Tales), but I find pages that crumble when you touch them a bit depressing. I do collect book reprints of pulp fiction, both horror and crime – from the Arkham House classics (or cheaper reprints) to the likes of Woolrich and Hammett. I think the best of pulp fiction is as good as anything in the weird fiction and crime fiction genres.

Because I'm mostly reading reprint collections and anthologies, I feel the 1940s Weird Tales is rather underrated relative to the 'Golden Age' 1930s version. True, there's no more new Lovecraft, Howard or Smith – but you have early Bradbury, Leiber and Sturgeon, some of the best of Bloch and Wellman: groundbreaking work that resonates with modern weird fiction. I don't personally feel that the English ghost story tradition has stood up half as well – it's rather like comparing the challenge and intensity of Hammett or Woolrich with the cosy puzzle-solving of Agatha Christie. There are, of course, great stories in both traditions, but I don't accept the literary snobbery that consigns American pulp fiction to a lower stratum than books written as 'literary' collections in the UK.

But of course, the picture is more complex than that. American pulp horror was more influenced by the fevered Gothic imagination of Machen and Hodgson than the English ghost story was. In Wells, Machen, Blackwood and Hodgson we see brilliant possibilities abandoned by the English ghost story writers, but taken up and developed by American pulp fiction. That was the first, and most far-reaching, cultural British Invasion.

Odalisque
06-04-2009, 03:22 AM
But of course, the picture is more complex than that. American pulp horror was more influenced by the fevered Gothic imagination of Machen and Hodgson than the English ghost story was. In Wells, Machen, Blackwood and Hodgson we see brilliant possibilities abandoned by the English ghost story writers, but taken up and developed by American pulp fiction. That was the first, and most far-reaching, cultural British Invasion.

Without checking, I feel pretty sure that Wells, Machen, Blackwood and Hodgson were all reprinted in Weird Tales, something that maybe confirms your idea.

I can't put my hand on it at this minute, but somewhere I have a printing of an M R James letter responding to a copy of Lovecraft's Supernatural Horror in Literature someone had sent him. His revealed attitude to both Lovecraft and Machen seemed to me unpleasantly snobbish.

Joel
06-04-2009, 06:51 AM
The two Blackwood stories were new, and included the excellent 'Roman Remains'. The two Machen stories were minor. The only Hodgson story reprinted in WT was 'The Hog', though four of his sea horror stories appeared in the 1970s Moskowitz-edited revival of WT. Three good Wells stories were reprinted. What's notable is that work by these authors blended in naturally with new work by American authors in WT. But so, to be fair, did reprints of ghost stories by E.F. Benson and six new stories by H.R. Wakefield, at least one of which ('A Black Solitude') had a cover illustration. from the 1940s onwards, August Derleth's anthologies blended the weird fiction traditions or sub-genres in an audacious and memorable way.

Odalisque
06-04-2009, 11:36 AM
The only Hodgson story reprinted in WT was 'The Hog'...

Which begs the question, did Hodgson write The Hog? I once intended to attempt to settle that question by comparing such things as the structure of sentences in The Hog with those in stories Hodgson is known to have written. My initial work with this revealed what seemed to me significant differences in style. But the work proved to dull and laborious for me. (Or, as others might put it, I was too lazy too complete the work.)

mark_samuels
06-04-2009, 03:02 PM
This link about Hodgson's authorship of "The Hog" might be of interest:

http://groups.google.co.uk/group/alt.books.ghost-fiction/browse_thread/thread/a25e8b363f49e1bf/5ac59fb0d8227ae1?lnk=gst&q=%22the+hog%22+derleth&rnum=1&hl=en#5ac59fb0d8227ae1

Mark S.

Evans
06-04-2009, 03:36 PM
I can't put my hand on it at this minute, but somewhere I have a printing of an M R James letter responding to a copy of Lovecraft's Supernatural Horror in Literature someone had sent him. His revealed attitude to both Lovecraft and Machen seemed to me unpleasantly snobbish.

Here it is:
http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~pardos/ArchiveMRJLetter.html (http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/%7Epardos/ArchiveMRJLetter.html)

I seem to remember something about Machen having written James a letter praising his Canon Alberic's Scrapbook.

The two Blackwood stories were new, and included the excellent 'Roman Remains'. The two Machen stories were minor.

Out of interest which stories were they?

Odalisque
06-04-2009, 05:16 PM
I can't put my hand on it at this minute, but somewhere I have a printing of an M R James letter responding to a copy of Lovecraft's Supernatural Horror in Literature someone had sent him. His revealed attitude to both Lovecraft and Machen seemed to me unpleasantly snobbish.

Here it is:
http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~pardos/ArchiveMRJLetter.html (http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/%7Epardos/ArchiveMRJLetter.html)


That's it! The passage on Machen I had in mind is: Arthur Machen has a nasty after-taste: rather a foul mind I think, but clever as they make 'em.

Julian Karswell
06-04-2009, 05:36 PM
I can't put my hand on it at this minute, but somewhere I have a printing of an M R James letter responding to a copy of Lovecraft's Supernatural Horror in Literature someone had sent him. His revealed attitude to both Lovecraft and Machen seemed to me unpleasantly snobbish.

Here it is:
http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~pardos/ArchiveMRJLetter.html (http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/%7Epardos/ArchiveMRJLetter.html)

I seem to remember something about Machen having written James a letter praising his Canon Alberic's Scrapbook.

The two Blackwood stories were new, and included the excellent 'Roman Remains'. The two Machen stories were minor.

Out of interest which stories were they?

I may be misremembering, but I think the 1895 letter Machen sent James praising 'Alberic's Scrapbook' letter is filed with the collection of James papers held by Kings College, Cambridge.

James was clearly something of a snob from childhood onwards. I think his objection to Machen was motivated by a dislike for Machen's subversive eroticism (which was clearly heterosexual); his association with mystical societies which James preferred to regard from afar; and the simple fact that he wasn't a Cambridge man.

It is well-documented that James revered authors such as Le Fanu and Erckmann-Chatrian but I genuinely believe he didn't know what to make of the decadent 1890s horror writers. They were nihilists, fin-de-siecle dilettantes and anarchists where James was very much a sound establishment figure. He probably admired aspects of Machen's work but was cautious about encouraging a those who belonged to a movement that threatened his belief system.

Lord Byron and Oscar Wilde were also somewhat notorious figures and I don't recall James commenting publicly about either. Again, I'm sure that he may have appreciated the fruits of their artistic labour, but was uncomfortable with the unwholesome baggage of their private lives. James was far happier championning duller wordsmiths because they led respectable lives.

His stance regarding E F Benson is odd. He clearly admired and respected Benson's literary ability, but as with Wakefield, he believed that both authors erred by overstepping the line when it came to nastiness. I don't entirely believe this explanation because many of James' horror stories are grislier and more disturbing; I think he subconsciously objects to the psycho-sexual imagery (Benson's graphic depiction of female genitalia and Wakefield's sexually motivated sadism). Of course, this is arguably hypocritical given the homosexual imagery which often runs rampant in his own work, but I think that it is the key to unlocking his concerns.

Wakefield and Benson attended the same private schools that James did, whereas Machen didn't. Personally, I find Wakefield's sadistic sexualisation of women far more disturbing than Machen's alchemical decadence or Benson's misogyny, but James obviously thought him a sounder man, presumably because he had attended Eton.

Odalisque
06-04-2009, 06:34 PM
Sorry, I meant to add that Machen developed a pronounced antipathy for Dons and Public Schools (Private Schools here in England), which he expressed in The Secret Glory...

I can't blame him for that. I was much cheered when I heard on the news, the other day, that some Eton boys had contracted swine flu.

Evans
06-04-2009, 06:46 PM
Machen's 1895 letter is cited in Cox's MRJ biography:

"[Machen congratulated] him on a 'marvellous piece of work': 'I am myself somewhat curious and critical in horrors and mysteries, and know how immensely difficult is the concoction of the genuine article; but I have seen nothing for a very long time that is half as good as the 'Scrapbook'."

(viz "The Scrapbook of Canon Alberic")

Later in life, however, reviewing Montague Summers The Supernatural Omnibus, Machen was less effusive about James:

"Mr Summers holds that amongst living artists in his kind the most successful are Dr. James and Vernon Lee; and, so far as Doctor James is concerned, at all events, I believe he has the great majority of readers with him. I differ profoundly from this judgment. Both these writers are scholarly in their knowledge and in their manner of using it, but their tales seem to me academic exercises in ghostly things." The Other Side, New Statesman Nov. 1931.

He then goes on to praise Blackwood as of the highest (something he did quite a bit, I've got a Machen review of The Lost Valley that's very laudatory), and of course although not close friends, Blackwood attended Machen's famous 80th Birthday bash at the Hungaria Restaurant in 1943.

Mark S.

Thank you for turning that up Mark. Am I imagining it or did Machen mention Canon Alberic's Scrapbook in a letter to someone else regarding a "Review"? Out of interest are there any collected volumes of Machen's correspondence?



I may be misremembering, but I think the 1895 letter Machen sent James praising 'Alberic's Scrapbook' letter is filed with the collection of James papers held by Kings College, Cambridge.

Thanks for the info Karswell.


James was clearly something of a snob from childhood onwards. I think his objection to Machen was motivated by a dislike for Machen's subversive eroticism (which was clearly heterosexual); his association with mystical societies which James preferred to regard from afar; and the simple fact that he wasn't a Cambridge man.


I agree that James may have found the some of sexual elements (particularly the dryly upfront aspect in tales like The Novel of the White Powder) in Machen's work distastefuly. I don't really know enough about James as person to comment on how strongly the mystical aspects of Machen would have effected him


I can't put my hand on it at this minute, but somewhere I have a printing of an M R James letter responding to a copy of Lovecraft's Supernatural Horror in Literature someone had sent him. His revealed attitude to both Lovecraft and Machen seemed to me unpleasantly snobbish.

While I do agree in part I think his comment on Samuel Loveman's sentence regarding Hawthorne and Poe was amusing. Its interesting to note that Robert "King in Yellow" Chambers gets a mention in James letter as well.

Evans
06-04-2009, 07:17 PM
Evans

Machen also mentioned MRJ to John Lane during 1895(?), suggesting his tales be gathered together in the Keynotes series.

Machen's correspondence is scattered here and there, but perhaps the most representative is Arthur Machen: Selected Letters (Aquarian 1988). There are a number of other volumes to single correspondents (such as Montgomery Evans, Vincent Starrett and Munson Havens). Lots of Machen correspondence, too, in the FOAM journal Faunus, all eighteen editions of it!

http://www.machensoc.demon.co.uk/


Thanks for the information about the letters Mark. I think I've seen the Montgomery Evans collection before in some unexpected place (the Chaosium RPG website?). I really must become a member the Machen society sometime.


The MRJ Alberic tale first turned up in The National Review, so perhaps that's what you may have had in mind?

Mark S.

Yes! That's it.

Joel
06-04-2009, 07:29 PM
Some Eton pupils have contracted swine flu? The word 'swine' is unnecessary in that sentence.

Evans, the Machen stories reprinted in WT were 'The Bowmen' and 'The Lost Club'.

Evans
06-04-2009, 10:20 PM
Evans, the Machen stories reprinted in WT were 'The Bowmen' and 'The Lost Club'.

Thanks Joel - On hindsight I should have suspected The Bowmen since it has a certain infamy.

Julian Karswell
06-04-2009, 10:23 PM
Sorry, I meant to add that Machen developed a pronounced antipathy for Dons and Public Schools (Private Schools here in England), which he expressed in The Secret Glory...

I can't blame him for that. I was much cheered when I heard on the news, the other day, that some Eton boys had contracted swine flu.

Shame on you, Odalisque. I despise inverted snobbery as much as the more common form: both are examples of prejudice.

Reggie Oliver went to Eton on the same Newcastle Scholarship as H.R. Wakefield and M.R. James. All were children when they sat the entrance exam, and all were no doubt enthusiastically encouraged to do their best by their parents. Quite why they should be pilloried, damned or even flippantly joked about is unjust.

I was raised in a 'normal' home and then a council house. I attended a school which took local children and paying boarders. We regularly competed with two local private fee-paying schools (one of which was Stowe, also recently closed because of swine flu). The children who attended all of these schools were exactly the same barring the wealth and aspirations of their parents. However, the wealthier ones were not born pigs destined to spend their lives with their snouts in the trough, as your "joke" seeks to imply.

Sending a six year old child off to a boarding school is not dissimilar to putting a child into care. They share many of the same emotional traumas and carry the same scars throughout their lives. Only a very cold-hearted person could fail to be moved by the plights of those privileged public schoolboys, the musician Nick Drake and Caspar Fleming, son of Ian Fleming. Both committed suicide in their 20s; both spent their lives in the public school system; both were sensitive souls who struggled to cope with being despatched from the family home to attend boarding schools such as Eton.

[Tedious aside: Reggie Oliver not only dedicated one of his stories to Caspar Fleming but gave him a cameo appearance, and I have produced a novella soon to be published by Ex Occidente Press to Nick Drake.]

I am as suspicious of all politicians as the next man should be, but I disagree profoundly with the sentiment that wealthy people produce swinelike offspring. Children have very little power and control over their lives, and it is wrong to brand them as inferior simply because of where their parents sent them. Indeed, they deserve our sympathy, not least because they were turfed out of the family home at a tender age and packed off to a foreign place.

Hogwarts is a romantic fiction, Odalisque. You'd be better off using Lindsay Anderson's "If" or any Ken Loach film as a basis for formulating opinions about your opinion of private fee-paying schools.

JK

[Whose daughter attends a local fee-paying school - but as a non-boarder.]

Julian Karswell
06-04-2009, 10:34 PM
Some Eton pupils have contracted swine flu? The word 'swine' is unnecessary in that sentence.

Joel:

I understand that you are homosexual. [Who isn't, to varying degrees?]

How would you like it if people posted derogatory comments of a homophobic nature? I presume you would object (as would I, although I classify myself as heterosexual). In fact I am pretty certain you would object, which I hope is not an impertinence on my behalf.

Of course, genuine wit and humour is excused: as some comedians say, "I'm not homophobic; some of my best friends are benders."

Prejudice is prejudice is prejudice. So why is at alright for you to joke about swine flu and Etonians, but not for others to joke about (for example) gays, niggers or wops?

JK

NB. Sorry if this comes across as a personal attack, it isn't intended to be. I'm only interested in the issues.

Evans
06-04-2009, 10:40 PM
Sorry, I meant to add that Machen developed a pronounced antipathy for Dons and Public Schools (Private Schools here in England), which he expressed in The Secret Glory...

I can't blame him for that. I was much cheered when I heard on the news, the other day, that some Eton boys had contracted swine flu.
I am grimly amused by the way the tabloid papers seem to have lost interest in the disease they spent so long scaremongering over.


Hogwarts is a romantic fiction, Odalisque. You'd be better off using Lindsay Anderson's "If" or any Ken Loach film as a basis for formulating opinions about your opinion of private fee-paying schools.

I am going to continue basing my erroneous and out dated idea of public schools on Good Bye To All That.


Sending a six year old child off to a boarding school is not dissimilar to putting a child into care. They share many of the same emotional traumas and carry the same scars throughout their lives. Only a very cold-hearted person could fail to be moved by the plights of those privileged public schoolboys, the musician Nick Drake and Caspar Fleming, son of Ian Fleming. Both committed suicide in their 20s; both spent their lives in the public school system; both were sensitive souls who struggled to cope with being despatched from the family home to attend boarding schools such as Eton.

[Tedious aside: Reggie Oliver not only dedicated one of his stories to Caspar Fleming but gave him a cameo appearance, and I have produced a novella soon to be published by Ex Occidente Press to Nick Drake.]

Supernatural or none supernatural? (feel free to tell me to hop it should this info be clasified)

Julian Karswell
06-05-2009, 05:49 AM
Oh, definitely supernatural. It's a fifty page story about the mental breakdown of a man haunted by the spirit of what he believes to be the ghost of a fictionalised Nick Drake, and it draws heavily from the various biographies and documentaries that have been made about ND. I've been liasing with ND's estate about the story and may be producing a combined novella / CD for this year's forthcoming annual remembrance festival with a musician who is reasonably well known for his excellent renditions of Drake's material.

JK

Odalisque
06-05-2009, 10:13 AM
Sorry, I meant to add that Machen developed a pronounced antipathy for Dons and Public Schools (Private Schools here in England), which he expressed in The Secret Glory...

I can't blame him for that. I was much cheered when I heard on the news, the other day, that some Eton boys had contracted swine flu.

Shame on you, Odalisque. I despise inverted snobbery as much as the more common form: both are examples of prejudice.



:D I expected someone to take issue with that, but didn't realise that I'd raise the Julian Karwell ire. You don't seem to have been about much recently. Welcome back! ;)

Joel
06-05-2009, 11:23 AM
Julian – because Eton is a cultural and social institution that encourages and intensifies certain attitudes in its pupils: attitudes whose consequences we see all the time in the political sphere. I'm using 'swine' in pretty much exactly the same sense in which Ligotti uses it to talk about corporate businessmen in 'My Work Is Not Yet Done'.

I really don't think this is the same as directing abuse against a social or ethnic minority. Etonians generally regard themselves an elite who are born to lead and govern – as such they collectively deserve all the political abuse that can be aimed to knock them off their perch. I wouldn't assume that any one given Etonian deserved personal abuse for being such, but that wasn't meant to be the basis of my comment.

I think it's appropriate to belittle members of a political or social clique for the arrogance that characterises that clique – but not necessarily to assume that their lives in other areas are tainted. For example, I despise Kenneth Clarke as a politician but respect his enthusiasm for modern jazz. If I were talking about him as a jazz enthusiast, I would not be abusive. If I were talking about him as the charm offensive of Thatcherism, I would be.

I don't think all negative comments about particular social groups, cliques, organisations, classes or categories are equivalent and reflect prejudice. It depends very much on who you're talking about and what you're saying. If my comment about Etonians came across as prejudice – rather than as opportunistic political invective – then I'm quite willing to apologise. I've known (though not, I'm sorry to say, in the Biblical sense) at least two old Etonians who were terrific people – but they both despised the arrogant way in which old Etonians in public life are inclined to behave.

Joel
06-05-2009, 11:26 AM
P.S. On reviewing my 'swine flu' joke I can see it's not very funny and can easily be read as callous. So fair enough: I'm sorry.

Evans
06-05-2009, 11:40 AM
Julian – because Eton is a cultural and social institution that encourages and intensifies certain attitudes in its pupils: attitudes whose consequences we see all the time in the political sphere. I'm using 'swine' in pretty much exactly the same sense in which Ligotti uses it to talk about corporate businessmen in 'My Work Is Not Yet Done'.

I'd be more inclined to use that epithet against Thatcher's nouvea riche than Etonians and the like. The way Dominio used swine suggests a certain level of eternal, greedy aspirance.

I have nothing against Eton or any other public school.

bendk
06-05-2009, 11:56 AM
P.S. On reviewing my 'swine flu' joke I can see it's not very funny and can easily be read as callous. So fair enough: I'm sorry.

I thought it was funny, and I knew what you meant. And I seriously doubt that many people would condemn anyone personally just because of the school they attended.

mark_samuels
06-05-2009, 06:38 PM
Alas, I was so bored, and drunk, I decided to go on a "riot" of deletion.

Mark S.

Joel
06-05-2009, 08:43 PM
If memory serves, Mark deleted his own rant in appreciation of Machen. Which was the best thing on this thread so far.

Evans
06-05-2009, 09:03 PM
Alas, I was so bored, and drunk, I decided to go on a "riot" of deletion.

Mark S.

Ahhh but you can not defeat my special plan for some of those posts. They live on in my quotations!

If memory serves, Mark deleted his own rant in appreciation of Machen. Which was the best thing on this thread so far.

On the subject of Machen (and random chatting) my copy of Ritual and Other Stories ought to arrive any day now.

Julian Karswell
06-06-2009, 09:03 AM
Alas, I was so bored, and drunk, I decided to go on a "riot" of deletion.

Mark S.

Stop having fun drinking and writing and jetsetting around the world - go and have some kids and suffer like the rest of us.

There should be a law requiring every adult over the age 25 to adopt at least one rowdy child. When you're old and wheelchair bound it'll be other people's children caring for you.

I for one would introduce a grading system whereby people who'd had the most childfree fun would be left to fend for themselves. The worst offenders i.e. those who have had most fun with zero parental responsibiilities would be put on rafts and pushed out to sea like the old Norse funeral pyres.

JK

G. S. Carnivals
06-06-2009, 03:26 PM
Alas, I was so bored, and drunk, I decided to go on a "riot" of deletion.

Mark S.

Stop having fun drinking and writing and jetsetting around the world - go and have some kids and suffer like the rest of us.

There should be a law requiring every adult over the age 25 to adopt at least one rowdy child. When you're old and wheelchair bound it'll be other people's children caring for you.

I for one would introduce a grading system whereby people who'd had the most childfree fun would be left to fend for themselves. The worst offenders i.e. those who have had most fun with zero parental responsibiilities would be put on rafts and pushed out to sea like the old Norse funeral pyres.

JK
Mr. Karswell, I am a single male with no children who is drinking delicious Canadian beer as he is writing this. I am a bit offended at your prescription to cure my life. Come on, baby, light my pyre.

bendk
06-06-2009, 03:37 PM
Here are a couple of other horror pulp titles that I didn't mention in my original post. They are considered by collectors to be in the "Weird Menace" catagory.

http://www.philsp.com/data/images/t/thrilling_mystery_193601.jpg


http://www.philsp.com/data/images/d/dime_mystery_193910.jpg

Cover photo links:

http://www.philsp.com/mags/dime_mystery.html (http://www.philsp.com/mags/dime_mystery.html)

http://www.philsp.com/mags/thrilling_mystery.html (http://www.philsp.com/mags/thrilling_mystery.html)


As a pulp enthusiast, I am fortunate to have the annual Pulpcon in my home state of Ohio. People travel from all over the country for this event. It is usually held in Dayton or Bowling Green. This year it will be going to Columbus. I have been to about half a dozen cons and they are always a good time. It is held over a weekend in the Summer months. I have only stayed for one day, though. But it is great to see all of the old magazines. Sometimes they even have original cover paintings on display. And it is nice to hear the collectors reminisce about the glory days of the pulps. The first Pulpcon I went to was when I was in my late twenties. It was funny, I felt like a youngster. Many of the pulp collectors read them in their youth in the 30s and 40s. I even saw Jim Steranko at a con once, but I was too shy to introduce myself. I was afraid I would turn into a total fan boy and embarrass myself if I talked to him. I was in awe of his work as a kid.

Julian Karswell
06-06-2009, 05:49 PM
Alas, I was so bored, and drunk, I decided to go on a "riot" of deletion.

Mark S.

Stop having fun drinking and writing and jetsetting around the world - go and have some kids and suffer like the rest of us.

There should be a law requiring every adult over the age 25 to adopt at least one rowdy child. When you're old and wheelchair bound it'll be other people's children caring for you.

I for one would introduce a grading system whereby people who'd had the most childfree fun would be left to fend for themselves. The worst offenders i.e. those who have had most fun with zero parental responsibiilities would be put on rafts and pushed out to sea like the old Norse funeral pyres.

JK
Mr. Karswell, I am a single male with no children who is drinking delicious Canadian beer as he is writing this. I am a bit offended at your prescription to cure my life. Come on, baby, light my pyre.

Your pyre shall be made from Moosehead bottles and loud, noisy children will throw stones at your raft for eternity as you attempt to cross the river Styx.

[To be honest, I pity you the beer: I occasionally drive down into the next county to buy a keg of Old Growler, which is a deep, rich, chocolatey winter ale of epic grandeur.]

Joel
06-06-2009, 08:49 PM
Bendk, is there an anthology of 'shudder pulp' stories that you would recommend? I assume the magazines themselves are too crumbly and expensive for anyone but the serious collector.

bendk
06-07-2009, 01:41 AM
Bendk, is there an anthology of 'shudder pulp' stories that you would recommend? I assume the magazines themselves are too crumbly and expensive for anyone but the serious collector.


Joel,
Yes, I would suggest getting a copy of High Adventure #56.

http://www.adventurehouse.com/

In the left hand margin is the list of options. After selecting each option it will take you to another sceen.
Select:
Pulps Reprints
High Adventure
High Adventure #56 Thrilling Mystery (Weird Menace) issue.

It usually costs $7.95 but is on sale for $3.00. It is printed in a glossy magazine format. The stories are reprinted in facsimile including the illustrations, which is important because the art is half the fun.

I have seen more than a few Shudder Pulp stories scattered in horror anthologies over the years, but they have been mixed in with traditional tales.

I hesitate to call this a "recommendation" in the usual sense. Robert Aickman I recommend. But it does contain nine stories in the Weird Menace mode. And it is pretty cheap. You're right, the original pulps can sell for obscene amounts of money. I have seen a single copy of Spicy Detective sell for over $1,000 on eBay. But that was in like new condition. It is not uncommon for the horror pulps to sell between $100 - $200 each. I have some beat up originals that I accumulated over the years, and I do own a number of replicas.

Joel
06-07-2009, 07:09 AM
Thanks very much, Bendk.

bendk
06-11-2009, 12:41 PM
Here are a couple more horror titles.

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f96/pulpgallery/posters/acemys193605ebay.jpg

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f96/pulpgallery/posters/startlingmys194004ebay.jpg

http://i3.ebayimg.com/04/i/04/61/fe/fd_1_b.JPG

I read that Strange Tales published stories more like Weird Tales than the Shudder Pulps. It only had a short run of seven issues before folding in the harsh economic times of 1933. Wildside Press and Girasol Collectibles reprinted some or all of them. This is the description at Amazon for the above reprint.

STRANGE TALES OF MYSTERY AND TERROR . . .

When Strange Tales first appeared in 1931 as a pulp magazine, it was clearly something new. Edited by Harry Bates as a companion to Astounding Stories, it combined the supernatural horror and fantasy of Weird Tales with vigorous action plots. Had the Great Depression not intervened and killed it after seven issues, the whole history of fantastic fiction might have been different.
Strange Tales rapidly attracted the most imaginative and capable writers of the day, including such Weird Tales regulars as Robert E. Howard, Clark Ashton Smith, Henry S. Whitehead, Hugh B. Cave, Ray Cummings, and numerous others.
Certainly Strange Tales gave Weird Tales a serious run for its money. The March 1932 issue features work by Paul Ernst, Henry S. Whitehead, Gordon MacCreagh, and more. The fine cover by H.W. Wesso illustrates 'The Duel of the Sorcerers,' by Paul Ernst.

Wildside Press had a mini-revival by issuing two new issues under the editorship of Robert M. Price in 2005. I have not purchased these yet. The cover art for both issues is by an artists we all know, Jason Van Hollander. Here is one of them:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51VPAFM4KWL._SS500_.jpg

Hell-Ghost
07-10-2014, 11:06 AM
In the nethermost recesses of my dark heart there lurks a fondness for the pulps. There are times when I find myself torn between highbrow weird writers- Lovecraft, Ligotti, Aickman- and the pulps, namely Hugh B. Cave, whom is the only pulp writer that I truly enjoy. I am drawn to ancient vaults and tombs, decrepit catacombs and crypts harbouring nameless ghouls. Such embarrassingly conventional imagery (to use Ligotti's words) are not to be found in the tales of Aickman, yet I can still read warmly to his illogical realism. I like my horror or weird fiction to transcend the trappings of its story to metaphysical heights and beyond. Even authors who are not considered genre writers, Artaud, de Lautreamont, Beckett, I can still respect because their goal is to shatter the false faηade we call reality. And the English ghost story tradition is a school of weird writing that I have largely abandoned reading, with the exception of the Brothers Benson, E. Nesbit and a few others, because I find them to be merely the same over and over and over and over again. Their power though, particularly in Jamesian ghost stories, rests on the scant descriptions of the hideous phantoms and ghoul-spectres that haunt the tales. I admire and respect traditional ghost stories though no longer enjoy them as I once did. Experimental and avant-garde literature is something else that I enjoy. I feel that the majority of modern horror-fiction is stale and repetitive due to lack of experimentation. It is merely the same stories recycled over and over. Sometimes one must think outside the box (or should that be coffin?) to bring fresh life to a weird tale. The results may be poor but I feel that I would rather keep trying to explore new boundaries than read the same story of what happened to the Smith family when they vacationed in a Satanist village over and over again.

Nemonymous
07-10-2014, 11:54 AM
Experimental and avant-garde literature is something else that I enjoy. I feel that the majority of modern horror-fiction is stale and repetitive due to lack of experimentation. It is merely the same stories recycled over and over. Sometimes one must think outside the box (or should that be coffin?) to bring fresh life to a weird tale.

I agree with that ambition.

Nemonymous
07-10-2014, 04:51 PM
Experimental and avant-garde literature is something else that I enjoy. I feel that the majority of modern horror-fiction is stale and repetitive due to lack of experimentation. It is merely the same stories recycled over and over. Sometimes one must think outside the box (or should that be coffin?) to bring fresh life to a weird tale.

I agree with that ambition.

Thanks for evoking thoughts on this subject. It has stirred me to write a short blog about it here (http://nullimmortalis.wordpress.com/2014/07/10/todays-skyline-the-avant-garde-and-me/). :)

Nemonymous
07-11-2014, 01:50 AM
For me, there can be a distinction between the Experimental and the Avant Garde in Art - two different sensibilities, the former breaking some rules of a traditional medium but abiding by others, the latter only abiding by its own rules.
Literature can straddle both, like Tristram Shandy or Finnegans Wake.

Nemonymous
07-11-2014, 02:33 AM
PS
I have always considered Ligotti's work to be experimental.

gveranon
07-11-2014, 03:21 AM
For me, there can be a distinction between the Experimental and the Avant Garde in Art - two different sensibilities, the former breaking some rules of a traditional medium but abiding by others, the latter only abiding by its own rules.
Literature can straddle both, like Tristram Shandy or Finnegans Wake.

My main guide to all things avant-garde has been the great critic, cultural historian, and polyartist Richard Kostelanetz. Reading and rereading him over many years has been an education in itself. Kostelanetz has severe standards for what is and isn't truly avant-garde. For instance, he doesn't seem to think much of Calvino, Ballard, Gass, Eno, and many others -- not innovative enough. Now, I like all of the above named, but (as with, say, Ligotti's stated views about pessimism) there is virtue to having a strict standard. We need, or at least I need, lodestars in these matters. I am generally not an avant-gardist in my tastes and views about art; I can say this because reading Kostelanetz has clarified some matters for me. However, I am still interested in innovation in the arts.

For those who haven't read Kostelanetz, there are many rich books to suggest, but I would especially recommend A Dictionary of the Avant-Gardes. This is an invaluable reference book, and the kind of reference book you can read for pleasure.

Hell-Ghost
11-09-2014, 03:55 PM
I quote myself when I say that I feel modern stories of horror are lacking in experimentation, that and also vision. Experimentation and vision. This is why I no longer read the likes of David A. Riley and John Llewellyn Probert; their work is too prosaic and routine for my liking, mere entertainment. The likes, however, of Poe, Machen, Blackwood, Hope Hodgson, Ligotti, and Lovecraft whom are visionaries with their own distinct brand of horror, terror, and fear are, indeed, much more to my tastes. For a short while back in July I was interested in Modernism and experimental literature, yet I seem to have largely grown out of that phase now; I simply prefer old-fashioned Romanticism. I could be both a Romanticist and a Modernist, much like Yeats. I am somewhat fascinated - obsessed, I daresay - with the word ''visionary''. It is a word that I always use to describe my favourite weird artists and myself. Often I even go out on what I term my ''visionary walks'' for meditation and inspiration and sometimes to read a book that I bring along. But yes, experimentation and vision is what I find lacking in to-day's imaginative literature. I allow no such defects to contaminate my own work.

Nemonymous
11-09-2014, 04:16 PM
I quote myself when I say that I feel modern stories of horror are lacking in experimentation, that and also vision. Experimentation and vision. This is why I no longer read the likes of David A. Riley and John Llewellyn Probert; their work is too prosaic and routine for my liking, mere entertainment. The likes, however, of Poe, Machen, Blackwood, Hope Hodgson, Ligotti, and Lovecraft whom are visionaries with their own distinct brand of horror, terror, and fear are, indeed, much more to my tastes. For a short while back in July I was interested in Modernism and experimental literature, yet I seem to have largely grown out of that phase now; I simply prefer old-fashioned Romanticism. I could be both a Romanticist and a Modernist, much like Yeats. I am somewhat fascinated - obsessed, I daresay - with the word ''visionary''. It is a word that I always use to describe my favourite weird artists and myself. Often I even go out on what I term my ''visionary walks'' for meditation and inspiration and sometimes to read a book that I bring along. But yes, experimentation and vision is what I find lacking in to-day's imaginative literature. I allow no such defects to contaminate my own work.

I agree with much of what you say. I have found myself in recent years somehow tapping into the visionary and experimental in Weird, SF, Horror and Literary authors when real-time reviewing their books, even to the extent of uncovering things they did not intend, as if by some preternatural means they themselves tapped into the visionary by the act of writing something they didn't think they were writing.