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Julian Karswell
07-08-2009, 02:57 PM
You're shipwrecked on a desert island and you're allowed one item in each of the following categories. What would you chose?

NB. Absolutely no multiple answers along the lines of "It would be a choice between......"

1. Favourite Book
2. Favourite CD or record
3. Favourite DVD or VCR tape
4. Luxury item (not one of the above)

Mine would be:

1. 'Brideshead Revisited' by Evelyn Waugh; first UK edition in dw, warmly inscribed Max Beerbohm or P G Wodehouse
2. 'Oh, By The Way' by Pink Floyd (box set of all 14 studio albums)
3. 'The Definitive Ealing Studios Collection' (box set of 16 classic films)
4. Handmade 'club style' leather sofa with hardwood frame, coiled-sprung serpentine springs and William Morris style scatter cushions

JK

Spotbowserfido2
07-08-2009, 08:45 PM
You're shipwrecked on a desert island and you're allowed one item in each of the following categories. What would you chose?

NB. Absolutely no multiple answers along the lines of "It would be a choice between......"

1. Favourite Book
2. Favourite CD or record
3. Favourite DVD or VCR tape
4. Luxury item (not one of the above)

Mine would be:

1. 'Brideshead Revisited' by Evelyn Waugh; first UK edition in dw, warmly inscribed Max Beerbohm or P G Wodehouse
2. 'Oh, By The Way' by Pink Floyd (box set of all 14 studio albums)
3. 'The Definitive Ealing Studios Collection' (box set of 16 classic films)
4. Handmade 'club style' leather sofa with hardwood frame, coiled-sprung serpentine springs and William Morris style scatter cushions

JK
The sofa sounds nice, but how would you view the DVDs and listen to the CDs? (If I were offered three wishes, my first wish would be for more wishes. I learned that from an old Twilight Zone episode.)

Joel
07-09-2009, 04:33 AM
Julian, aren't compilation items another way of allowing yourself multiple choices? After all, a boxed set of the Folio Library is a discrete item... and a very tempting one. But leaving aside such temptations:Book: The October Country by Ray Bradbury[Why won't the screen let me italicise? Why?]CD: Blood on the Tracks by Bob DylanDVD: Running On EmptyLuxury item: Notebooks (hardbacked, A4) and pens (Parker ballpoint, black ink)

Joel
07-09-2009, 04:35 AM
The screen won't let me paragraph either. I'm going to sulk.

Julian Karswell
07-09-2009, 04:48 AM
Julian, aren't compilation items another way of allowing yourself multiple choices? After all, a boxed set of the Folio Library is a discrete item... and a very tempting one. But leaving aside such temptations:Book: The October Country by Ray Bradbury[Why won't the screen let me italicise? Why?]CD: Blood on the Tracks by Bob DylanDVD: Running On EmptyLuxury item: Notebooks (hardbacked, A4) and pens (Parker ballpoint, black ink)

Rats - I've been rumbled!

OK then....seeing as no Pink Floyd album is long enough, I'll switch to The Cure's 'Kiss Me Kiss Me Kiss Me', and on the DVD front, it would have to be 'Kind Hearts & Coronets', because despite circa 30 viewings over the years, I still find it delightful.

Odalisque
07-09-2009, 05:25 AM
The sofa sounds nice, but how would you view the DVDs and listen to the CDs?

Battery operated machines, I suppose. If you were going to spend much time watching the DVD or listening to the CD, though, you'd need a good supply of batteries.

(If I were offered three wishes, my first wish would be for more wishes. I learned that from an old Twilight Zone episode.)

That would be cheating! In real faery enchantments, cheating of that sort nullifies all wishes granted. (See the charter of faery enchantments rule 12B, also subsection G clause 7K for leprachaun wishes, and subsection L clause 19R for genie wishes.)

In any case, Desert Island discs and three wishes are entirely different things.

Anyway, here are my choices for today. On another day, some of them might be different.

1. The Wind in the Willows. Something I can read repeatedly without tiring of it.

2. Goldfrapp's Seventh Tree. Something to which I have listened repeatedly without tiring of it.

3. Get Girls Aloud's Style. It includes all of their videos up to the time of release (2007) -- and one can listen with or without audio commentary. I've watched it repeatedly without (so far) tiring of it.

4. My bed -- providing there was some way to protect it from the desert island rain. Ideally, with Sam (my cat) installed on the bed (as he so often is). Or would that count as two luxuries?

Nemonymous
07-09-2009, 10:02 AM
1. Weirdmonger by DF Lewis (as I would never get through fathoming it for real -for the reasons given hERe (http://weirdmonger.blog-city.com/realtime_review_of_weirdmonger_by_df_lewis_by_df_l ewis.htm).)
2. Brahms Symphonies
3. Death In Venice
4. Internet

Odalisque
07-09-2009, 12:44 PM
4. Internet

I think that I might be more relieved than otherwise to escape from the Internet. :o

Nemonymous
07-09-2009, 12:59 PM
I think that I might be more relieved than otherwise to escape from the Internet. :o

Well, I'll be able to read any amount of fiction on it. Including all the classics that happen to be on there.

Odalisque
07-10-2009, 10:30 AM
I think that I might be more relieved than otherwise to escape from the Internet. :o

Well, I'll be able to read any amount of fiction on it. Including all the classics that happen to be on there.

:eek:

I think that reading fiction on the Internet would be cheating. The idea of asking which book you would have is surely to ask "which book would you take if you could only have one book to read?" To then say that you'd also like to take a load more reading matter makes a mess of the book question. It would be like saying that, in addition to your one book, you'd also like the British Library as your luxury.

Matters are made even worse by the fact that music is available on the Internet, messing with the one CD you chose.

:eek::eek::eek:

Julian Karswell
07-10-2009, 11:02 AM
I think that I might be more relieved than otherwise to escape from the Internet. :o

Well, I'll be able to read any amount of fiction on it. Including all the classics that happen to be on there.

Sorry, no phones or internet on the desert island.

People can have CD players and TV sets but only to watch their chosen items.

Or else Milky Joe will come and get you.

Odalisque
07-11-2009, 06:44 AM
I think that I might be more relieved than otherwise to escape from the Internet. :o

Well, I'll be able to read any amount of fiction on it. Including all the classics that happen to be on there.

Sorry, no phones or internet on the desert island.

People can have CD players and TV sets but only to watch their chosen items.

Or else Milky Joe will come and get you.

An excellent decision, Mr Karswell, if I may say so. :)

Odalisque
07-12-2009, 07:47 AM
Here's my selection for today:

1. Eric Partridge: A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English. This is an endlessly fascinating study of some curious byways of the English language. Whenever I look something up in the dictionary, I find myself beguiled into reading numerous snippets.

2. Shampoo: Absolute Shampoo. This is a genuinely rare CD (according to Wikipedia it does not even exist as a CD). I paid more than 80 on EBay for my copy (coming to light after years of EBay searching for it on my behalf). And I feel that it has given me more pleasure than could be reasonably expected of items purchased for the sum I paid. It turned out to be a real gem.

3. Goldfrapp: Wonderful Electric. This is a 2 DVD set. If that is cheating, I'll take only the disc with the Somerset House gig (with Alison in kinky air hostess costume complete with those boots).

4. The Hat-hor altar above my bed. A focus for my devotions to the goddess.

Nemonymous
07-12-2009, 11:39 AM
Just re-watched 'Death In Venice' for the umpteenth time. I'm ever reminded what a perfect film it is.

http://thefilmwotiwatched.files.wordpress.com/2009/02/deathinvenice.jpg?w=304&h=380

Joel
07-13-2009, 08:21 AM
I rather lost respect for the film of Death in Venice and its director when I heard Dirk Bogarde explaining in an interview what Visconti did to achieve the convincing impression of mortal agony in the final scene. He told Bogarde he was going to apply some cream to his face to increase its pallor... then put paint-stripper on his face and made him sit in the sun, in pain, while the scene was filmed. Bogarde suffered skin damage as a result. These days, the director would be sued until he was sitting on his unprotected spinal column. Suffering for your art may be justifiable, but making other people suffer for it is not.

Nemonymous
07-13-2009, 08:29 AM
No agument with that. Other than it is Bogarde's art, too. A film is a communal, often disintentionalised, effort, a film he's iconised within.

Odalisque
07-13-2009, 11:17 AM
My attitude to that depends a bit on how bad the skin damage was.

paeng
07-13-2009, 03:13 PM
1. Kama Sutra (illustrated)

2. Lounge-a-palooza

3. Black Narcissus

4. GPS tracking unit

Spotbowserfido2
07-14-2009, 04:41 PM
4. GPS tracking unit
This seems to fall into the same disqualified category as the telephone and the internet. Let Judge Karswell don a wig and decide on this one. Furthermore, it seems pointless unless you somehow have fashioned a dugout canoe or other vessel to go somewhere else.

Also, doesn't anybody eat? Food and water come in handy.

Julian Karswell
07-14-2009, 04:54 PM
4. GPS tracking unit
This seems to fall into the same disqualified category as the telephone and the internet. Let Judge Karswell don a wig and decide on this one. Furthermore, it seems pointless unless you somehow have fashioned a dugout canoe or other vessel to go somewhere else.

Also, doesn't anybody eat? Food and water come in handy.

Egad and gadzooks!

Judge Karswell? I would disbar myself. I would far rather be in the dock, then at least I could be thrown out for contempt of court.

But yes, I agree with you: GPS should like mobile phones and the internet be prohibited. The whole idea of being cast away on a desert island is to lead a solitary existence.

JK

Odalisque
07-15-2009, 09:37 AM
Also, doesn't anybody eat? Food and water come in handy.

I don't think that food and water count as luxuries.

Spotbowserfido2
07-15-2009, 08:16 PM
Also, doesn't anybody eat? Food and water come in handy.

I don't think that food and water count as luxuries.
I raised the issue because provisions were not specified in the initial guidelines. Oh, Judge Karswell, where would our food and potable water come from?

Julian Karswell
07-15-2009, 08:23 PM
Also, doesn't anybody eat? Food and water come in handy.

I don't think that food and water count as luxuries.
I raised the issue because provisions were not specified in the initial guidelines. Oh, Judge Karswell, where would our food and potable water come from?

Waitrose food delivery twice a week, dropped cheerily by a waving Thomas Ligotti from his helicopter.

JK

Nemonymous
07-16-2009, 04:39 AM
I'm on the other side of the island with the Dharma Tapes. (And maybe the internet)

Caligari
07-20-2009, 10:28 PM
1. The Lesser Key of Solomon, because then I can bring 72 friends with me.

2. The Essential Lectures , by Alan Watts. So much to discover and re-discover.

3. The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.

4. A pack of Djarum Black kreteks (cigarettes), even if I have to light them by rubbing two sticks together.

It goes without saying I'm being a little facetious. Also, I've chosen less towards my favourites, and more towards what can last over time, you know, make a solitary existence more fulfilling than it already is. Any album, not matter how good, will get tedious with time, but I would hope that something like my album choice might last a bit longer. Of course, I say that now, but ask me when I end up on an island with the ghost of Alan Watts and see what I say then...