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bendk
05-12-2010, 03:10 AM
There are quite a few nice titles coming out from Ex-Occidente Press, but do you see some other horror books that may be of interest?


I just got this in an e-mail from PS Publishing. It sounds like it might be worth a read. Does anyone know Dowling's work?


http://i3.cmail3.com/ei/y/A6/603/6B9/235606/csimport/clowns_at_midnight_3.jpg


Announcing Clowns At Midnight by Terry Dowling


We're very excited about Terry Dowling's Clowns At Midnight -- so much so that we're almost having to sedate designer dynamique Mike Smith and editor emeritus Nick Gevers, both of whom worked extensively on the project (and who are still unable to sleep with the lights off).
For those who don't know Terry or his work, let's just say he is without doubt one of Australia's most acclaimed short story scribblers and Clowns -- amazingly his debut full-length novel -- is one of PS's finest dark fantasy/suspense titles, attracting plaudits from advance readers as a masterpiece of Gothic fiction and brilliantly sustained psychological tension.
We asked Nick to stop jumping up and down for a minute and tell you what it's about. Here goes:
"Residing in a comfortable house in the Australian countryside, a somewhat naive novelist confronts, and takes perverse pleasure in, his fear of clowns and everything resembling them: masks, marionettes, painted faces. His neighbours seem friendly, with a kindly interest in his unusual phobia; but why is it that they are so oddly knowledgeable about its symptoms and background history? And why are the writer's digital galleries of terrifying clown-moments being rearranged and augmented by invisible intruders? These questions lead him into an emotional and archetypal maelstrom in which serene exaltation and unmitigated fear are irretrievably mixed; are death and happiness identical?"

Thanks, Nick - so, there you have it! Terry has woven an astonishing tapestry of subtle, and at times subliminal, horror; we're confident that Clowns At Midnight will be regarded as one of the best genre books of the year, perhaps even of the decade... and we're expecting pre-orders to be brisk, so don't say we didn't warn you. There'll be 700 copies -- that's 200 traycased signed copies at £60 (http://pspublishing.cmail3.com/t/y/l/boluh/iuittdvr/k) and 500 trade hardcovers at a measly £25 (http://pspublishing.cmail3.com/t/y/l/boluh/iuittdvr/u), with free postage -- to anywhere! -- on all pre-orders for both editions. Place your order now!

bendk
05-12-2010, 03:21 AM
I like the premise of this book. I have always been intrigued by Dante's Inferno. My dad had a paperback copy on the bookshelf when I was a kid. It depicted a scene of tormented souls illustrated by Gustave Dore. To make matters worse, the cover designer tinted the illustration red! You could almost feel the hell fire. I didn't read the book until I was in my twenties. I enjoyed it, but my hell is nothing like Dante's. My version of hell is completely secular and is a mixture of noise and vulgarity.


http://i220.photobucket.com/albums/dd269/permutedpress/Book%20Covers/1934861316-frontcover-1.jpg



Working from Dante’s Inferno to draw out the reality behind the fantasy, author Kim Paffenroth unfolds the horrifying true events that led Dante to fictionalize the account of his lost years ...
For seventeen years of his life, the exact whereabouts of the medieval Italian poet Dante Alighieri are unknown to modern scholars. It is known that during this time he traveled as an exile across Europe, working on his epic poem, The Divine Comedy. In his masterpiece he describes a journey through the three realms of the afterlife. The most famous of its three volumes, Inferno, describes hell.
During his lost wanderings, Dante stumbled upon an infestation of the living dead. The unspeakable acts he witnessed—cannibalism, live burnings, evisceration, crucifixion, and dozens more—became the basis of all the horrors described in Inferno. Afraid to be labeled a madman, Dante made the terrors he experienced into a more “believable” account of an otherworldly adventure filled with demons and mythological monsters.





But at last, the real story can finally be told.


"Paffenroth is one of the most innovative and intelligent writers of zombie fiction."—The Horror Fiction Review


"A zombie novel of the first order."
—Hellnotes

"Some seriously smart horror fiction."
—Rue Morgue

bendk
05-12-2010, 03:33 AM
This book came to my attention when I read about it in the Summation 2009 in the book The Best Horror of the Year Volume Two edited by Ellen Datlow. This is what she had to say:

Monstrous Affections by David Nickle (Chizine Publications) is this Canadian's first collection, although the stories in it were originally published between 1994 and 2009. That story from 1994, "The Sloan Men," was chosen for the Year's Best Fantasy and Horror: Sixth Annual Collection. Michael Rowe provides an introduction to a powerful collection.


http://www.torvex.com/jmcdaid/files/monstrous_nickle-20090905-185047.jpg


http://www.chizine.com/chizinepub/books/monstrous-affections.php (http://www.chizine.com/chizinepub/books/monstrous-affections.php)

damo
05-14-2010, 07:54 PM
dunno how new it is, but it was new to me: has anyone read brian evenson. seems hes mates with peter straub, and his collection (the only thing ive read so far but have instantly ordered more) fugue state is fantastic. ligotti fans should defo like this guy, and not just for the strangeness of his stories - like tom, this guy transcends the genre in that he can really write; love it when you just relish the very act of reading. anyway, check him out.

damo
05-14-2010, 08:00 PM
oh, almost forgot, but just read a great little collection, which is new, by jeremy dyson. its called the cranes that build the cranes, and it follows his first collection entitled never trust a rabbit. both great. hes one of the co-writers of the dark comedy series the league of gentlemen.

Spotbowserfido2
05-14-2010, 08:32 PM
Brian Evenson - THE NIGHTMARE NETWORK (http://www.ligotti.net/showthread.php?t=472&highlight=evenson)

bendk
05-14-2010, 10:40 PM
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51kxCZzWfTL.jpg


This isn't a new book (it was originally published in 2000) but the price of an original copy is somewhat expensive. This new edition makes this book affordable once again. I ordered a copy recently for less than $20 including postage from Abebooks.


Product Description (From Amazon)

"Inside The Wicker Man" is a treat for all cinemagoers, exhaustively researched and achieving a near-perfect balance between history, trivia and serious analysis. Allan Brown describes the filming and distribution of the cult masterpiece as a 'textbook example of How Things Should Never Be Done'. The omens were bad from the start, and proceeded to get much, much worse, with fake blossom on trees to simulate spring, actors chomping on ice-cubes to prevent their breath showing on film, and verbal and physical confrontations involving both cast and crew. The studio hated it and hardly bothered to distribute it, but today it finds favour with critics and fans alike, as a serious - if flawed - piece of cinema. Brown expertly guides readers through the film's convoluted history, attempting along the way to explain its enduring fascination, and providing interviews with the key figures - many of whom still have an axe to grind, and some of whom still harbour plans for a sequel.


Paperback: 272 pages
Publisher: Polygon (May 1, 2010)

bendk
06-16-2010, 01:14 PM
In the introduction to this new anthology, Ellen Datlow states that the idea for this book originated from a possible "best of the best" from the first twenty years of the The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror. That series was cancelled, unfortunately, and the project never went through. It is nice to see that one of my favorite Ligotti stories, "The Greater Festival of Masks", made the cut.



http://images.barnesandnoble.com/images/38530000/38536057.JPG (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/imageviewer.asp?ean=9781892391957)



Darkness: Two Decades of Modern Horror


Introduction
Ellen Datlow

Foreward
Stefan Dziemianowicz

Jacqueline Ess: Her Last Will and Testament
Clive Barker

Dancing Chickens
Edward Bryant

The Greater Festival of Masks
Thomas Ligotti

The Pear-Shaped Man
George R.R. Martin

The Juniper Tree
Peter Straub

Two Minutes Forty-Five Seconds
Dan Simmons

The Power and the Passion
Pat Cadigan

The Phone Woman
Joe R. Lansdale

Teratisms
Kathe Koja

Chattery Teeth
Stephen King

A Little Night Music
Lucius Shepard

Calcutta, Lord of Nerves
Poppy Z. Brite

The Erl-King
Elizabeth Hand

The Dog Park
Dennis Etchison

Rain Falls
Michael Marshall Smith

Refrigerator Heaven
David J. Schow

(There is a black bar)
Joyce Carol Oates

Eaten (Scenes from a Moving Picture)
Neil Gaiman

The Specialist's Hat
Kelly Link

The Tree is My Hat
Gene Wolf

Heat
Steve Rasnic Tem

No Strings
Ramsey Campbell

Stitch
Terry Dowling

Dancing Men
Glen Hirshberg

My Father's Mask
Joe Hill

Bleak&Icy
06-17-2010, 11:38 AM
Does anyone know Dowling's work?


I do, indeed... but before Dowling was known as one of Australia's finest writers he worked as an actor and musician. During the late 1970s he often appeared on Australia's longest-running television program for children, Mr. Squiggle and Friends. Mr. Squiggle, in case you don't know, was a clown-puppet with a long pencil for a nose:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/41/Mr_Squiggle.jpg

The premise of the show was simple and wonderful: children would send in their "squiggles" and the pencil-nosed marionette would use them as the starting point for his quirky drawings. I was fanatical about the program, watching it religiously, and on several occasions I sent in my own squiggles, which the puppet transformed (although I can't remember exactly what he drew). As much as I loved the show, it also filled me with a prickling sense of dread, which proved utterly addictive. For you see, Mr. Squiggle always drew "upside down pictures," his pencil nose moving furiously over the paper with total abandon; but at some point during the operation he would yell out in his piping clown voice: "Upside down, upside down!" and his assistant would turn the picture the right way up, revealing as if by magic a tractor, or a bus, or some skipping children. This moment of transformation never failed to astonish me, and I credited the clown-puppet's nose with nothing less than demonic power. Mr. Squiggle used a talking blackboard for an easel, and this blackboard was a misanthropic, grumpy character, always groaning "Humph and double-humph," and urging the puppet to "Hurry up!"

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2131/2397422446_186fe42172.jpg

The blackboard terrified me, as did the dancing, drawing, madly creative clown-puppet--terrified and enthralled, much like Ligotti's fiction would do decades later.

Freyasfire
07-11-2010, 08:36 AM
I am very excited about the next release from Tartarus Press, Sourdough and Other Stories, by Angela Slatter. I have only read a few of her stories, but what I have read I have found simply exquisite. I was delighted when I found out that Tartarus was putting out a collection of her work.

http://www.tartaruspress.com/sourdough.jpg

http://www.tartaruspress.com/sourdough.htm

Freyasfire
07-13-2010, 04:37 PM
I'm not sure when exactly this is going to be released, but this two volume anthology collection looks somewhat interesting:

http://www.cemeterydance.com/Merchant2/graphics/00000001/pelan01.gif

The Century's Best Horror Fiction
edited by John Pelan
Cemetery Dance Publications commissioned a spectacular two-volume anthology project under the editorship of noted author and historian of the horror genre, John Pelan.
John selected one story published during each year of the 20th Century (1901-2000) as the most notable story of that year — all 100 stories were then collected in this amazing two volume set to be published as The Century's Best Horror Fiction.
The ground rules were simple: Only one selection per author. Only one selection per year.
Two huge volumes, one hundred authors, one hundred classic stories, over 700,000 words of fiction -- history in the making!
Table of Contents
1901: Barry Pain -- The Undying Thing
1902: W.W. Jacobs -- The Monkey's Paw
1903: H.G.Wells -- The Valley of the Spiders
1904: Arthur Machen -- The White People
1905: R. Murray Gilchrist -- The Lover's Ordeal
1906: Edward Lucas White -- House of the Nightmare
1907: Algernon Blackwood -- The Willows
1908: Perceval Landon -- Thurnley Abbey
1909: Violet Hunt -- The Coach
1910: Wm Hope Hodgson -- The Whistling Room
1911: M.R. James -- Casting the Runes
1912: E.F. Benson -- Caterpillars
1913: Aleister Crowley -- The Testament of Magdelan Blair
1914: M. P. Shiel -- The Place of Pain
1915: Hanns Heinz Ewers -- The Spider
1916: Lord Dunsany -- Thirteen at Table
1917: Frederick Stuart Greene -- The Black Pool
1918: H. De Vere Stacpoole -- The Middle Bedroom
1919: Ulric Daubeny -- The Sumach
1920: Maurice Level -- In the Light of the Red Lamp
1921: Vincent O'Sullivan -- Master of Fallen Years
1922: Walter de la Mare -- Seaton's Aunt
1923: George Allen England -- The Thing From--"Outside"
1924: C.M. Eddy, Jr. -- The Loved Dead
1925: John Metcalfe -- The Smoking Leg
1926: H.P. Lovecraft -- The Outsider
1927: Donald Wandrei -- The Red Brain
1928: H.R. Wakefield -- The Red Lodge
1929: Eleanor Scott -- Celui-La
1930: Rosalie Muspratt -- Spirit of Stonhenge
1931: Henry S. Whitehead -- Cassius
1932: David H. Keller -- The Thing in the Cellar
1933: C.L. Moore -- Shambleau
1934: L.A. Lewis -- The Tower of Moab
1935: Clark Ashton Smith -- The Dark Eidolon
1936: Thorp McCluskey -- The Crawling Horror
1937: Howard Wandrei -- The Eerie Mr Murphy
1938: Robert E. Howard -- Pigeons from Hell
1939: Robert Barbour Johnson -- Far Below
1940: John Collier -- Evening Primrose
1941: C.M. Kornbluth -- The Words of Guru
1942: Jane Rice -- The Idol of the Flies
1943: Anthony Boucher -- They Bite
1944: Ray Bradbury -- The Jar
1945: August Derleth -- Carousel
1946: Manly Wade Wellman -- Shonokin Town
1947: Theodore Sturgeon -- Bianca's Hands
1948: Shirley Jackson -- The Lottery
1949: Nigel Kneale -- The Pond
1950: Richard Matheson -- Born of Man & Woman
1951: Russell Kirk -- Uncle Isiah
1952: Eric Frank Russell -- I Am Nothing
1953: Robert Sheckley -- The Altar
1954: Everil Worrell -- Call Not Their Names
1955: Robert Aickman -- Ringing the Changes
1956: Richard Wilson -- Lonely Road
1957: Clifford Simak -- Founding Father
1958: Robert Bloch -- That Hell-Bound Train
1959: Charles Beaumont -- The Howling Man
1960: Fredric Brown -- The House
1961: Ray Russell -- Sardonicus
1962: Carl Jacobi -- The Aquarium
1963: Robert Arthur -- The Mirror of Cagliostro
1964: Charles Birkin -- A Lovely Bunch of Coconuts
1965: Jean Ray -- The Shadowy Street
1966: Arthur Porges -- The Mirror
1967: Norman Spinrad -- Carcinoma Angels
1968: Anna Hunger -- Come
1969: Steffan Aletti -- The Last Work of Pietro Apono
1970: David A. Riley -- The Lurkers in the Abyss
1971: Dorothy K. Haynes -- The Derelict Track
1972: Gary Brandner -- The Price of a Demon
1973: Eddy C. Bertin -- Like Two White Spiders
1974: Karl Edward Wagner -- Sticks
1975: David Drake -- The Barrow Troll
1976: Dennis Etchison -- It Only Comes Out at Night
1977: Barry N. Malzberg -- The Man Who Loved the Midnight Lady
1978: Michael Bishop -- Within the Walls of Tyre
1979: Ramsey Campbell -- Mackintosh Willy
1980: Michael Shea -- The Autopsy
1981: Stephen King -- The Reach
1982: Fritz Leiber -- Horrible Imagings
1983: David Schow -- One for the Horrors
1984: Bob Leman -- The Unhappy Pilgrimage of Clifford M.
1985: Michael Reaves -- The Night People
1986: Tim Powers -- Night Moves
1987: Ian Watson -- Evil Water
1988: Joe R. Lansdale -- The Night They Missed the Horror Show
1989: Joel Lane -- The Earth Wire
1990: Elizabeth Massie -- Stephen
1991: Thomas Ligotti -- The Glamour
1992: Poppy Z. Brite -- Calcutta Lord of Nerves
1993: Lucy Taylor -- The Family Underwater
1994: Jack Ketchum -- The Box
1995: Terry Lamsley -- The Toddler
1996: Caitlín R. Kiernan -- Tears Seven Times Salt
1997: Stephen Laws -- The Crawl
1998: Brian Hodge -- As Above, So Below
1999: Glen Hirshberg -- Mr. Dark's Carnival
2000: Tim Lebbon -- Reconstructing Amy

http://www.cemeterydance.com/page/CDP/PROD/pelan01

matt cardin
07-13-2010, 05:03 PM
John's "Century's Best" anthology has been in the works for a verrrry long time now. At last check, it was still set for a 2010 release. It has experienced many delays, but as the TOC indicates, it's a major piece of work that will be quite welcome whenever it finally appears.

Also in the "looking forward to" category is The Weird: A Compendium of Strange and Dark Fictions, which is currently being edited by Jeff and Ann Vandermeer, and is scheduled for publication this November. The title isn't accidental: instead of a general-horror themed anthology like the Century's Best or Peter Straub's American Fantastic Tales, this one is devoted purely, pointedly, and exclusively to weird fiction as such.

Yesterday at his blog, Jeff shared (http://www.jeffvandermeer.com/2010/07/12/the-weird-comparisons/) a chunk of the afterword by China Mieville, which gives the idea:

These are strange aeons. These texts, dead and/or not, burrow, and we cannot predict everything they will infect or eat their path through. But certainly your brain, and they will eat the books you read from today on, too. That is how the Weird recruits. This is a worm farm. These stories are worms.

Freyasfire
07-13-2010, 06:26 PM
Yes, I too am looking forward to the Vandermeers' upcoming anthology of weird fiction. I have been following it's progress closely on Jeff's blog. I am really looking forward to the unveiling of the massive book's table of contents!

hopfrog
07-13-2010, 08:11 PM
Pelan's anthology looks great, but when I see him in January at MythosCon I shall scold him for not including something by Jessica Amanda Salmonson, a much neglected and BRILLIANT short story writer.

starrysothoth
07-13-2010, 09:20 PM
Interesting choice of TL's "The Glamour" in the Pelan anthology. It's nice to see one of these mega horror fiction collections pick something written by Ligotti besides "The Last Feast of Harlequin." It's an excellent tale, no doubt, but overused (in my opinion) as a sample of his fiction in these types of books.

bendk
11-13-2010, 02:22 AM
Here are a couple of new horror books that may be of interest. Don't quote me on the Table of Contents for this first one. I have seen a few different versions. This is the most recent one I could find.





http://eb.tncdn.net/dyn/200/978/160/7012337.jpg







The Year's Best Dark Fantasy & Horror 2010


To be published this October by Prime Books, this inaugural volume of the year’s best dark fantasy and horror features more than 500 pages of dark tales from some of today’s best-known writers of the fantastique as well as new talents. Chosen from a variety of sources by Bram Stoker and international Horror Guild award-winning editor Paula Guran, these stories are as eclectic and varied as the darkness itself.




Kelley Armstrong. “A Haunted House of Her Own” (Twilight Zone)
Peter Atkins. “The Mystery,” (Spook City)
Dale Bailey and Nathan Balingrud. “The Crevasse” (Lovecraft Unbound)
Elizabeth Bear. “The Horrid Glory of Its Wings” (Tor.com, 12/08/09)
Deborah Biancotti. “Diamond Shell” (A Book of Endings)
Holly Black. “The Coldest Girl in Coldtown” (The Eternal Kiss: 13 Vampire Tales of Blood and Desire)
Nadia Bulkin. “Everything Dies, Baby” (Strange Horizons 9/31/09)
Ramsey Campbell. “Respect” (British Invasion)
Suzy McKee Charnas. “Lowland Sea” (Poe)
Robert Davies. “Bruise for Bruise” (Weird Tales 353)
Kurt Dinan. “Nub Hut” (ChiZine 1/09)
Steve Duffy. “Certain Death for a Known Person” (Apparitions)
Gemma Files.”The Jacaranda Smile” (Apparitions)
Seth Fried. “Frost Mountain Picnic Massacre: (One Story124)
Gerard Houarner. “The Other Box” (Strange Tales 3)
Stephen Graham Jones. “The Ones Who Got Away” (Phantoms)
Caitlin Kiernan. “The Bone’s Prayer” (Sirenia Digest)
Marc Laidlaw. “Leng” (Lovecraft Unbound)
Margo Lanagan. “Sea-Hearts” (X6)
John Langan. “The Wide, Carnivorous Sky” (By Blood We Live)
Joe R. Lansdale. “Torn Away” (Twilight Zone)
Kelly Link. “The Cinderella Game” (Troll’s Eye View)
Maura McHugh. “Vic” (Black Static 10)
Gary McMahon. “Strange Scenes From An Unfinished Film” (Cern Zoo)
Sarah Monette. “White Charles” (Clarkesworld #6)
Stewart O’Nan. “Monsters” (Cemetery Dance #61)
Holly Phillips. “Long Cold Goodbye” (Asimov’s, 3/09)
Sarah Pinborough. “The Nowhere Man” (British Invasion)
Norman Prentiss. “In the Porches of My Ears” (Postscripts 18)
Barbara Roden. “The Brink of Eternity” (Poe)
Ekaterina Sedia. “Cherrystone and Shards of Ice” (H.P. Lovecraft Magazine 5)
Michael Shea “Copping Squid” (Copping Squid)
Lucius Shepard. “Halloween Town” (F&SF, Oct/Nov 09)
Michael Marshall Smith. “What Happens When You Wake Up In the Night” (Nightjar Press)
Peter Straub. “Variations of a Theme from Seinfeld” (Cemetery Dance #61)
Steve Rasnic Tem.”The Cabinet Child” (Phantoms)
Paul Tremblay. “Headstone In Your Pocket” (Weird Tales #353)
Catherynne M.Valente. “A Delicate Architecture” (Troll’s Eye View)


The Year’s Best Dark Fantasy and Horror 2010
Edited by Paula Guran
Prime Books
544 pages | trade paperback | $19.95
ISBN: 9781607012337




http://i.ebayimg.com/12/!!d7cf4wCWM~$(KGrHqN,!hUEv1+0IYHNBME2gcE16g~~_8.JP G?set_id=81040003C1



Occult scholar Donald Tyson plumbs the depths of H. P. Lovecraft's cosmic visions and horrific dream world to examine, warts and all, the strange life of the man who created the Necronomicon and the Cthulhu Mythos. Lovecraft expressed disdain for magic and religion, and most of his biographers have dismissed the mystical side of his nature. Tyson concludes that Lovecraft was a man in fundamental conflict with himself, and reveals Lovecraft for what he truly was—a dreamer, an astral traveler, and the prophet of a new age.


I swiped this one from Matt's site. If you haven't been over there to read it, I encourage you to do so.

http://theteemingbrain.wordpress.com/ (http://theteemingbrain.wordpress.com/)


I am not sure if I am going to get this one. I am interested in dreams, but I have little or no interest in the occult. The one review at Amazon is somewhat troubling. On the other hand, S.T. Joshi gives it a good blurb (which surprises me a little given the premise.)


“The Dream World of H. P. Lovecraft is a thought-provoking and intellectually stimulating book. Its fusion of sound biographical knowledge and critical insight makes it a must-read for Lovecraftians.”
—S. T. JOSHI, LEADING AUTHORITY ON H. P. LOVECRAFT

Brendan Moody
11-13-2010, 12:49 PM
I have a copy of The Year's Best Dark Fantasy and Horror 2010. I've only read a couple stories so far, but I'm looking forward to digging into when I can find the time. That table of contents is mostly accurate, but there's one additional story, John Mantooth's "The Water Tower."

hopfrog
11-14-2010, 07:39 AM
http://i.ebayimg.com/12/!!d7cf4wCWM~$(KGrHqN,!hUEv1+0IYHNBME2gcE16g~~_8.JP G?set_id=81040003C1



Occult scholar Donald Tyson plumbs the depths of H. P. Lovecraft's cosmic visions and horrific dream world to examine, warts and all, the strange life of the man who created the Necronomicon and the Cthulhu Mythos. Lovecraft expressed disdain for magic and religion, and most of his biographers have dismissed the mystical side of his nature. Tyson concludes that Lovecraft was a man in fundamental conflict with himself, and reveals Lovecraft for what he truly was—a dreamer, an astral traveler, and the prophet of a new age.


I swiped this one from Matt's site. If you haven't been over there to read it, I encourage you to do so.

http://theteemingbrain.wordpress.com/ (http://theteemingbrain.wordpress.com/)


I am not sure if I am going to get this one. I am interested in dreams, but I have little or no interest in the occult. The one review at Amazon is somewhat troubling. On the other hand, S.T. Joshi gives it a good blurb (which surprises me a little given the premise.)


“The Dream World of H. P. Lovecraft is a thought-provoking and intellectually stimulating book. Its fusion of sound biographical knowledge and critical insight makes it a must-read for Lovecraftians.”
—S. T. JOSHI, LEADING AUTHORITY ON H. P. LOVECRAFT

I am one-third into ye Tyson book, and it is well done, mostly a regular "straight" biography of Lovecraft. The occult discussions are of little interest and of no importance biographically. The one thing I dislike is that Tyson paints Lovecraft as an unpleasant freak, and HPL was not that at all. Lovecraft was an Outsider, but he was not the strangely disturbed creature that so many want to imagine that he is. For an honest and authentic portrait of the real Lovecraft, I AM PROVIDENCE is the best.

Brendan Moody
02-20-2011, 02:07 PM
I have a copy of The Year's Best Dark Fantasy and Horror 2010. I've only read a couple stories so far, but I'm looking forward to digging into when I can find the time.
I finally found the time, and have written a brief review of the anthology on my blog (http://noondaystars.blogspot.com/2011/02/years-best-dark-fantasy-and-horror-2010.html).

bendk
03-28-2011, 06:45 PM
A few that I am considering picking up.



http://www.brianhodge.net/pix/PickingTheBones(sm).jpg (http://www.cemeterydance.com/page/CDP/PROD/hodge02)



Table of Contents:
With Acknowledgments To Sun Tzu
If I Should Wake Before I Die
The Passion of the Beast
De Fortuna
The Firebrand Symphony
Brushed In Blackest Silence
Pull
An Ounce Of Prevention Is Worth A Pound Of Flesh
And They Will Come In The Hour of Our Greatest Need
Re: Your Application of 5/5
Where the Black Stars Fall
When the Silence Gets Too Loud
Guardian
Hate the Sinner, Love the Sin
A Good Dead Man Is Hard To Find
Our Turn Too Will One Day Come
When the Bough Doesn't Break


Due to be published this Spring by Cemetery Dance. Nice cover art by Vincent Chong.

More info here:
http://www.cemeterydance.com/sh/hodge02.html (http://www.cemeterydance.com/sh/hodge02.html)





http://cache.smashwire.com/bookCovers/1d67eac87e9844caa085320e9b765c74008ce3db



I think this is currently available only as an ebook.

A hooded figure wanders a lonesome road waiting for a special someone...A criminal returns home to face old memories and new nightmares...A man awakes to find himself living in a mirror image of reality...and diners at a restaurant find themselves confronted with a terrifying revelation about who and what they are...These are among the nineteen nightmarish tales that await you onstage in the THEATER MACABRE...

Table of Contents:

Head in the Clouds
How the Night Receives Them
The Acquaintance
Ravens
Keepsakes
Long Distance
The Wrong Side of the Bed
The Tradition
Turrow
Not Quite Ghosts
They See You When You're Sleeping
Stirrings
From the Wall, a Whisper
Visiting Hours
Outside the Theater
A Letter from Phoenix
Outside
Eight Minutes
912






Dreams the Ragman by Greg F. Gifune (Limited Edition HC)



http://www.horror-mall.com/images/P/cover_dtr1.jpg



As a young boy Derrick listened to his grandfather’s spooky tales of “The Ragman,” an old junk dealer and boogieman of sorts to the children in the neighborhood who he claimed had followed him throughout his entire life and stalked him from the depths of his own worst nightmares. But as an alcoholic ravaged with senility, his grandfather’s stories were dismissed as delusions.
When years later, murder comes to Derrick’s small hometown, he and his best friend Caleb—both teenage outcasts—discover that the killer is a hobo dressed in rags who rides the rails in and out of town when committing his crimes. They dub him “The Ragman” unaware of just how accurate that nickname may be, but the murders are never solved.
As time passes, Derrick weds and settles into a troubled marriage while Caleb moves to New York City and spirals into drug addiction and madness. Thirty years later, in a dying seaside resort town, the killings have begun again. Has The Ragman returned, or is something even more sinister taking place?
As Derrick and Caleb meet at the scene of the latest grisly murders, they soon find themselves confronted with an unsolved mystery that has haunted them for decades and an eternal evil they may never be able to escape. The rain falls, darkness descends, a train’s whistle blows, and the Ragman begins to dream...

bendk
03-28-2011, 06:48 PM
And I like the title of this one.



http://www.wildsidebooks.com/thumbnail.asp?file=assets/images/wildsidedouble16.jpg&maxx=300&maxy=0

Brendan Moody
03-29-2011, 08:47 PM
I recently read Teeth: Vampire Tales, a YA vampire anthology edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling. "Vampire" and "YA" may make you think Twilight, but fortunately there's no comparison. My review, which opens with a marginally-relevant Thomas Ligotti quote, is here (http://noondaystars.blogspot.com/2011/03/teeth-vampire-tales.html).

starrysothoth
04-03-2011, 08:41 PM
I recently read Teeth: Vampire Tales, a YA vampire anthology edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling. "Vampire" and "YA" may make you think Twilight, but fortunately there's no comparison. My review, which opens with a marginally-relevant Thomas Ligotti quote, is here (http://noondaystars.blogspot.com/2011/03/teeth-vampire-tales.html).

This sounds interesting. Vampires are back in popular culture, and in a big way thanks to the whole Twilight saga and other media.

I keep wondering if this will infuse the literary horror niche with a new wave of interested members. I'll give it a few more years before I draw any conclusions, since many of the Twilight fans are fairly young, and the journey into serious weird horror can be a lengthy one once the doorway is kicked down, usually by an author like Lovecraft, Poe, Machen, Le Fanu, etc.

bendk
05-06-2011, 01:03 AM
This looks like a fun read. Great cover art too!


http://www.horrorsociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/HellTrain.jpg


Synopsis

Imagine there was a supernatural chiller that Hammer Films never made. A grand epic produced at the studio’s peak, which played like a cross between the Dracula and Frankenstein films and Dr Terror’s House Of Horrors…
Four passengers meet on a train journey through Eastern Europe during the First World War, and face a mystery that must be solved if they are to survive. As the ‘Arkangel’ races through the war-torn countryside, they must find out:
What is in the casket that everyone is so afraid of?
What is the tragic secret of the veiled Red Countess who travels with them?
Why is their fellow passenger the army brigadier so feared by his own men?
And what exactly is the devilish secret of the Arkangel itself?

Bizarre creatures, satanic rites, terrified passengers and the romance of travelling by train, all in a classically styled horror novel.




And this one could be interesting. Massie, who has written a few good first person crazies, teams up with Alan M. Clark of The Pain Doctors infamy.


http://www.alanmclark.com/shop/catalog/images/dd_murphry.jpg



D.D. Murphry has a way with words—or is it that words have their way with him? Work the clues alongside this unlikely sleuth to reveal an underground cabal of letters, a conspiracy of meaning, right below the surface of the everyday world.
Murphry is both hero and villain, an unforgettable personality who will have you cringing while you laugh and rooting for his every misguided plan. This is a clever tale told with a dexterity that allows for a gritty, noir feel, insight into the frailty of the human mind and the ability to see the absurdity in it all.

Freyasfire
05-06-2011, 01:01 PM
I am curious about this, even though I haven't read much Brian Hodge before, and still have one of his previous collections, Lies & Ugliness, still awaiting to be read on my shelves.

http://www.cemeterydance.com/Merchant2/graphics/00000001/hodge02.jpg

Table of Contents:
With Acknowledgments To Sun Tzu
If I Should Wake Before I Die
The Passion of the Beast
De Fortuna
The Firebrand Symphony
Brushed In Blackest Silence
Pull
An Ounce Of Prevention Is Worth A Pound Of Flesh
And They Will Come In The Hour of Our Greatest Need
Re: Your Application of 5/5
Where the Black Stars Fall
When the Silence Gets Too Loud
Guardian
Hate the Sinner, Love the Sin
A Good Dead Man Is Hard To Find
Our Turn Too Will One Day Come
When the Bough Doesn't Break

From the Cemetery Dance website:

Picking the Bones
by Brian Hodge
About the Book:
Dying is easy. Living is hard.
Step back, back into the world of 1996…
"Dark fiction so numbing cold and cutting edge you better hold onto your ass with your free hand … There are no simple ‘entertainments' or cheap grabs for the throat to be found here. Hodge is deadly serious about presenting a world where the worst punishment is the mere fact that you are aware you will probably live to see another day."
So wrote critic Stanley Wiater about Brian Hodge's renowned first short fiction collection, The Convulsion Factory. Three collections later, nothing has changed.
Well … maybe one or two trifling entertainments. A couple of cheap grabs for some body part or another. But that's about it. There are still plenty of fates worse than death.

njhorror
05-06-2011, 01:09 PM
I've read Brian Hodge's work and like it very much.

I'd preordered this at a time when I had to be very selective for financial reasons. You might want to read Lies and Ugliness first to see if he's your cup of tea.



That Fowler book looks great!

bendk
05-08-2011, 05:12 AM
http://cb.pbsstatic.com/l/89/2089/332089.jpg



ICE CORES: essays on Lovecraft's novella At the Mountains of Madness.

With a new short story "The Floaters of the Barrens", being an immediate sequel to At the Mountains of Madness.

100 pages, 18,000 words. Well illustrated. A new 6" x 9" perfect-bound paperback.

CONTENTS:

'Antarktos' by H.P. Lovecraft (Sonnet XV of Fungi from Yuggoth).

"The Floaters of the Barrens" (new short story).

On the writing and early publication history of Mountains.

A survey of the literary precursors and prequels of Mountains.

A survey of the literary and media sequels to Mountains.

The current events of October 1929—Spring 1931, in relation to Lovecraft and his work.

On the visual inspirations for Mountains.

Aspects of the science in Lovecraft's Mountains.

"The white madness": some extracts from real-life accounts of madness and death on polar expeditions (nine pages).

Research bibliography (52 items of scholarly and research interest).

Brendan Moody
05-20-2011, 02:10 PM
At the end of June from Obverse Books (http://obversebooks.co.uk/shop/obverse-quarterly/), Bite Sized Horror, a mini-anthology edited by Johnny Mains, and featuring stories by Mains, Paul Kane, Marie O'Regan, David A. Riley, Conrad Williams, and Reggie Oliver. I read an advance copy of this one, and thought it was pretty enjoyable (http://noondaystars.blogspot.com/2011/05/bite-sized-horror.html).

bendk
07-11-2011, 03:48 AM
https://www.nightshadebooks.com/secure/images/products/201_large5.jpg



Coming September 2011

Ia! Ia! Cthulhu Fhtagn!

First described by visionary author H. P. Lovecraft, the Cthulhu mythos encompass a pantheon of truly existential cosmic horror: Eldritch, uncaring, alien god-things, beyond mankind's deepest imaginings, drawing ever nearer, insatiably hungry, until one day, when the stars are right....

As that dread day, hinted at within the moldering pages of the fabled Necronomicon, draws nigh, tales of the Great Old Ones: Cthulhu, Yog-Sothoth, Hastur, Azathoth, Nyarlathotep, and the weird cults that worship them have cross-pollinated, drawing authors and other dreamers to imagine the strange dark aeons ahead, when the dead-but-dreaming gods return.

Now, intrepid anthologist Ross E. Lockhart has delved deep into the Cthulhu canon, selecting from myriad mind-wracking tomes the best sanity-shattering stories of cosmic terror. Featuring fiction by many of today's masters of the menacing, macabre, and monstrous, The Book of Cthulhu goes where no collection of Cthulhu mythos tales has before: to the very edge of madness... and beyond!

Do you dare open The Book of Cthulhu? Do you dare heed the call?

Table of Contents

Caitlin R. Kiernan - Andromeda among the Stones
Ramsey Campbell - The Tugging
Charles Stross - A Colder War
Bruce Sterling - The Unthinkable
Silvia Moreno-Garcia - Flash Frame
W. H. Pugmire - Some Buried Memory
Molly Tanzer - The Infernal History of the Ivybridge Twins
Michael Shea - Fat Face
Elizabeth Bear - Shoggoths in Bloom
T. E. D. Klein - Black Man With A Horn
David Drake - Than Curse the Darkness
Charles R. Saunders - Jeroboam Henley's Debt
Thomas Ligotti - Nethescurial
Kage Baker - Calamari Curls
Edward Morris - Jihad over Innsmouth
Cherie Priest - Bad Sushi
John Hornor Jacobs - The Dream of the Fisherman's Wife
Brian McNaughton - The Doom that Came to Innsmouth
Ann K. Schwader - Lost Stars
Steve Duffy - The Oram County Whoosit
Joe R. Lansdale - The Crawling Sky
Brian Lumley - The Fairground Horror
Tim Pratt - Cinderlands
Gene Wolfe - Lord of the Land
Joseph S. Pulver, Sr. - To Live and Die in Arkham
John Langan - The Shallows
Laird Barron - The Men from Porlock


Trade Paperback
978-1-59780-232-1
400 Pages - $15.99

bendk
09-03-2011, 01:39 PM
I can't remember if these have been posted before or not. (My memory is shot)

http://www.prime-books.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/Halloween.jpg (http://www.prime-books.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/Halloween.jpg)

Halloween edited by Paula Guran

Type: Trade Paperback
Pages: 576
Size: 6" X 9"
ISBN: 9781607012832
Publication Date: September 27, 2011
Price: $14.95


[This book is not yet published.]

Shivers and spirits...the mystical and macabre...our darkest fears and sweetest fantasies...the fun and frivolity of tricks, treats, festivities, and masquerades. Halloween is a holiday filled with both delight and dread, beloved by youngsters and adults alike. Celebrate the most magical season of the year with this sensational treasury of seasonal tales—spooky, suspenseful, terrifying, or teasing—harvested from a multitude of master storytellers.





Contributors in Alphabetical Order:
The October Game by Ray Bradbury
Tessellations by Gary Braunbeck
Memories by Peter Crowther
Universal Soldier by Charles de Lint
Auntie Elspeth's Halloween Story (or The Gourd, The Bad, And The Ugly) by Esther Friesner
Struwwelpeter by Glen Hirshberg
Pranks by Nina Kiriki Hoffman
By the Book by Nancy Holder
The Sticks by Charlee Jacob
Riding Bitch by K.W. Jeter
On the Reef by Caitlin R. Kiernan
Memories of el Dia de los Muertos by Nancy Kilpatrick
The Great Pumpkin Arrives at Last by Sarah Langan
On a Dark October by Joe R. Lansdale
Conversations in a Dead Language by Thomas Ligotti
Hallowe’en in a Suburb by H.P. Lovecraft (poem)
Pumpkin Night by Gary McMahon
The Halloween Man by William F. Nolan
Monsters by Stewart O’Nan
Three Doors by Norman Partridge
Ulalume by Edgar Allan Poe (poem)
Night Out by Tina Rath
Hornets by Al Sarrantonio
Tamlane by Sir Walter Scott (poem)
Mask Game by John Shirley
Pork Pie Hat by Peter Straub
Halloween Street by Steve Rasnic Tem
Tricks & Treats: One Night on Halloween Street by Steve Rasnic Tem
The November Game by F. Paul Wilson
Sugar Skulls by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro


http://www.inarkansas.com/img.php?w=413&src=http://assets.inarkansas.com/17490/southern-gods-by-john-hornor-jacobs.jpg


Southern Gods
by John Hornor Jacobs

This book has been getting good reviews on Amazon.

A chilling Southern Gothic thriller set in 1951 Arkansas and Tennessee, follows hired muscle Bull Ingram as he tries to track down Ramblin' John Hastur, a mysterious blues man whose dark music -- broadcast at ever-shifting frequencies by a phantom radio station --is said to make living men insane and dead men rise.

Brendan Moody
09-30-2011, 01:08 PM
Two new anthologies I recommend highly:

Ghosts by Gaslight: Stories of Steampunk and Supernatural Suspense (edited by Jack Dann and Nick Gevers)

(http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0765328283/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=thest042-20&linkCode=as2&camp=217145&creative=399373&creativeASIN=0765328283)Blood and Other Cravings
(edited by Ellen Datlow)


Ghosts by Gaslight offers modern spins on the Victorian/Edwardian ghostly tale; contributors include Peter S. Beagle, Gene Wolfe, Terry Dowling, Lucius Shepard, and Robert Silverberg. Blood and Other Cravings features stories of vampires and vampirism, whether they feed on blood or stranger things; contributors include Barbara Roden, Steve Rasnic Tem, Melanie Tem, Steve Duffy, Lisa Tuttle, Michael Cisco, and (with a reprint) Reggie Oliver. Margo Lanagan, John Langan, and Laird Barron have stories in both anthologies. My review of Blood and Other Cravings is here (http://noondaystars.blogspot.com/2011/09/freedom-of-vampire-blood-and-other.html), and my review of Ghosts by Gaslight is here (http://noondaystars.blogspot.com/2011/09/ancestral-spirits.html).

Brendan Moody
10-22-2011, 02:52 PM
I come bearing yet more recent anthologies.

A Book of Horrors is a new all-original (well, one unacknowledged reprint) non-theme anthology from Stephen Jones. With contributions from Stephen King, John Ajvide Lindqvist, Ramsey Campbell, Reggie Oliver, Robert Shearman, Michael Marshall Smith, Lisa Tuttle, and others, it's got a lot of big names and a great range of stories, only a couple of which are letdowns. My review is here (http://noondaystars.blogspot.com/2011/10/book-of-horrors.html). Unfortunately the book isn't in print in the US yet, but you can import it from The Book Depository (http://www.bookdepository.com/Horrors-Stephen-Jones/9780857388087), or get a Kindle version on Amazon.com.

A Book of Horrors

Stephen Jones also has a new ghost story anthology, Haunts, which mixes originals and reprints, with stories from some of the same names (Tuttle, Smith, Campbell, Oliver, Shearman). I was less impressed with this one, but my mother, also a ghost story buff, was a fan. My review is here (http://noondaystars.blogspot.com/2011/10/haunts.html).

Haunts: Reliquaries of the Dead

And finally, Jonathan Oliver's House of Fear, a set of haunted house stories. Lisa Tuttle and Shearman, who are having a busy year, show up again; there are also stories by Terry Lamsley, Stephen Volk, Joe R. Lansdale, Chaz Brenchley, and the prolific Many Others. I had tiny but important quibbles with several of the stories, but it's still an impressive anthology. My review of this one is here (http://noondaystars.blogspot.com/2011/10/house-of-fear.html).

House of Fear: An Anthology of Haunted House Stories (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1907992073/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=thest042-20&linkCode=as2&camp=217145&creative=399373&creativeASIN=1907992073)

Professor Angell.
10-26-2011, 04:33 PM
https://www.nightshadebooks.com/secure/images/products/201_large5.jpg



Coming September 2011

Ia! Ia! Cthulhu Fhtagn!

First described by visionary author H. P. Lovecraft, the Cthulhu mythos encompass a pantheon of truly existential cosmic horror: Eldritch, uncaring, alien god-things, beyond mankind's deepest imaginings, drawing ever nearer, insatiably hungry, until one day, when the stars are right....

As that dread day, hinted at within the moldering pages of the fabled Necronomicon, draws nigh, tales of the Great Old Ones: Cthulhu, Yog-Sothoth, Hastur, Azathoth, Nyarlathotep, and the weird cults that worship them have cross-pollinated, drawing authors and other dreamers to imagine the strange dark aeons ahead, when the dead-but-dreaming gods return.

Now, intrepid anthologist Ross E. Lockhart has delved deep into the Cthulhu canon, selecting from myriad mind-wracking tomes the best sanity-shattering stories of cosmic terror. Featuring fiction by many of today's masters of the menacing, macabre, and monstrous, The Book of Cthulhu goes where no collection of Cthulhu mythos tales has before: to the very edge of madness... and beyond!

Do you dare open The Book of Cthulhu? Do you dare heed the call?

Table of Contents

Caitlin R. Kiernan - Andromeda among the Stones
Ramsey Campbell - The Tugging
Charles Stross - A Colder War
Bruce Sterling - The Unthinkable
Silvia Moreno-Garcia - Flash Frame
W. H. Pugmire - Some Buried Memory
Molly Tanzer - The Infernal History of the Ivybridge Twins
Michael Shea - Fat Face
Elizabeth Bear - Shoggoths in Bloom
T. E. D. Klein - Black Man With A Horn
David Drake - Than Curse the Darkness
Charles R. Saunders - Jeroboam Henley's Debt
Thomas Ligotti - Nethescurial
Kage Baker - Calamari Curls
Edward Morris - Jihad over Innsmouth
Cherie Priest - Bad Sushi
John Hornor Jacobs - The Dream of the Fisherman's Wife
Brian McNaughton - The Doom that Came to Innsmouth
Ann K. Schwader - Lost Stars
Steve Duffy - The Oram County Whoosit
Joe R. Lansdale - The Crawling Sky
Brian Lumley - The Fairground Horror
Tim Pratt - Cinderlands
Gene Wolfe - Lord of the Land
Joseph S. Pulver, Sr. - To Live and Die in Arkham
John Langan - The Shallows
Laird Barron - The Men from Porlock


Trade Paperback
978-1-59780-232-1
400 Pages - $15.99

Just started reading this yesterday, so far so good.
However, the titles "Calamari Curls " and "Jihad over Innsmouth" sounds...worrying. I'm allergic to comedy-horror crossovers...however, havn't read them just yet.

hopfrog
10-26-2011, 07:46 PM
Just started reading this yesterday, so far so good.
However, the titles "Calamari Curls " and "Jihad over Innsmouth" sounds...worrying. I'm allergic to comedy-horror crossovers...however, havn't read them just yet.

Some few others have complain'd about the humorous tales in the book, but there don't seem to be too many, and there are such great tales, classics of their kind. I, too, am allergic to Mythos tales that try to be humorous or cute -- they usually suck shoggoth. And I find it insulting to Lovecraft, as it seems to imply that he is an author one cannot take seriously, so let's poke fun. As a Lovecraftian author, I am dead serious.

Dr. Valzer
10-29-2011, 07:24 AM
[quote=Professor Angell.;71682]
And I find it insulting to Lovecraft, as it seems to imply that he is an author one cannot take seriously, so let's poke fun. As a Lovecraftian author, I am dead serious.

And that's why I love your work, Wilum.

What most people erroneously assume to be "trappings" in HPL's work were his genuine impressions of the world. He was a Gothic soul whose oneiric vision and disdain for the mundane world make him a target for ridicule by a culture that is now, more than ever, overwhelmingly mundane.

Richard

njhorror
11-03-2011, 11:55 AM
I think that TERROR TALES FROM THE LAKE DISTRICT from Gray Friar Press is excellent.

Actually kind of spotty. I was swept away by Little Mag’s Barrow by Adam L.G. Nevill.

bendk
07-20-2012, 05:20 AM
http://blogs.houstonpress.com/artattack/assets_c/2012/07/shadowshow1-thumb-250x376.jpg (http://blogs.houstonpress.com/artattack/shadowshow1.jpg)




http://bks4.books.google.com/books?id=hjoeAQAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&imgtk=AFLRE72iVffNjhN6SoWgGzR1cvUaVS80fhZqYsDV5uq3 SOg-YcMzZLby9uwZF5HI1WxvYdEHph7FPkP3H1SilJ9B-rC6Z5mvPWEipN4yfXBPp7Y74TSgrC4vXEpH-wfad8epMQ1RGBni


Performing a deft metaphorical evisceration of Sigmund Freud’s classic 1919 essay that delved deeply into the tradition of horror writing, this freshly contemporary collection of literary interpretations reintroduces to the world Freud’s compelling theory of das unheimliche—or, the uncanny. Specifically designed to challenge the creative boundaries of some of the most famed and respected horror writers working today—such as A. S. Byatt, Christopher Priest, Hanif Kureishi, Frank Cottrell Boyce, Matthew Holness, and the indomitable Ramsey Campbell—this anatomically precise experiment encapsulates what the uncanny represents in the 21st century. Masterfully narrated with the benefit of unique perspectives on what exactly it is that goes bump in the night, this chilling modern collective is not only an essential read for fans of horror but also an insightful and intriguing introduction to the greats of the genre at their gruesome best.






http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTM5OFg5Mjg=/%24%28KGrHqZHJDQE7y9+vCcpBO-mC5UNqg~~60_12.JPG


Cover art by BOB EGGLETON
Intro by DAVID J. SCHOW & Afterward by PHILIP HARBOTTLE

DreamHaven Books 2011, 1st. US Edition Trade Paperback, 240 pages 6 x 9. This is the 1st US publication of the rare 1954 UK novelization of CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON by Vargo Statten (John Russell Fearn). Copies of the first edition have sold for $1000 to $6000. Now DreamHaven Books makes this ­little-seen novel available to all Universal Monster fans.
It’s an exciting novelization faithful to the movie with an emphasis on the view of the mysterious Gill Man.
Creature connosieur David J. Schow (The Crow) provides a great new introduc­tion on the impact of this iconic monster.
Philip ­Harbottle ( Vulture of the Void: The LEGACY)
details the life of the English pulp writer who created this terrific novel.
32 pages with dozens of behind-the-scenes photos fill out this brand-new ­edition, sure to thrill monster fans everywhere.




http://www.tworavenspress.com/assets/pics/9781906120597.jpg

MURMURATIONS
Uncanny stories about birds
Nicholas Royle (editor)



Freud observed that birds ‘don’t seem to be submitted to the same laws of gravity as us’, although without gravity they would die, as they need it to swallow. Birds are all around us; they could not be more familiar. And yet at the same time they are alien, unheimlich – uncanny.
Award-winning editor Nicholas Royle brings together previously published stories by Daphne du Maurier, Anna Kavan, Russell Hoban and others with brand-new tales by contemporary writers including Bill Broady, Adam Marek, Regi Claire and many more.
With a foreword by Angelica Michelis, senior lecturer in English at Manchester Metropolitan University.

With a foreword by Angelica Michelis, senior lecturer in English at Manchester Metropolitan University.Contributors’ royalties and editor’s fee to be donated to the RSPB.

Contents
Swallows Sleep in Winter – Adam Marek
For the True Anatomy – Claire Massey
Sliding off the World – Bruce Gilbert
The Gannets – Anna Kavan
Fight or Flight – Emma Jane Unsworth
Birds of Prey – Joel Lane
The Egg – Alison Moore
The Raven – Russell Hoban
The Rhododendron Canopy – Elizabeth Stott
Huginn and Muninn – Tom Fletcher
When the Red, Red Robin – Regi Claire
A Nestling – Jack Trevor Story
Barren Clough – Neil Campbell
Shrike – David Rose
The Candling – Deborah Kermode
A Revelation of Cormorants – Mark Valentine
The Brids – Bill Broady
Rarely Visits Gardens – Juliet West
All Our Dead Heavens – Conrad Williams
Tsipporah – Adèle Geras
Dead Bird – Socrates Adams-Florou
The Beautiful Room – RB Russell
Gulls – Nicholas Royle
Snow – Marc Werner
Flight of Fancy – GA Pickin
The Wounded Bird – Michael Kelly
Corbeaux Bay – Geeta Roopnarine
Husks – Stephen Bacon
Painful Hard Ectoplasm – Laura Ellen Joyce
The Birds – Daphne du Maurier

bendk
09-20-2012, 06:48 AM
http://thebookofcthulhu.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/tboc2_cover-199x300.jpg


Introduction, Ross E. Lockhart
Shoggoth's Old Peculiar, by Neil Gaiman
Nor the Demons Down Under the Sea, by Caitlin R. Kiernan
This Is How the World Ends, by John R. Fultz
The Drowning at Lake Henpin, by Paul Tobin
The Ocean and All Its Devices, by William Browning Spencer
Take Your Daughters to Work, by Livia Llewellyn
The Big Fish, by Kim Newman
Rapture of the Deep, by Cody Goodfellow
Once More from the Top, by A. Scott Glancy
Hour of the Tortoise, by Molly Tanzer
I Only Am Escaped Alone to Tell Thee, by Christopher Reynaga
Objects from the Gilman-Waite Collection, by Ann K. Schwader
Of Melei, of Ulthar, by Gord Sellar
A Gentleman from Mexico, by Mark Samuels
The Hands that Reek and Smoke, by W. H. Pugmire
Akropolis, by Matt Wallace
Boojum, by Elizabeth Bear and Sarah Monette
The Nyarlathotep Event, by Jonathan Wood
The Black Brat of Dunwich, by Stanley C. Sargent
The Terror from the Depths, by Fritz Leiber
Black Hill, by Orrin Grey
The God of Dark Laughter, by Michael Chabon
Sticks, by Karl Edward Wagner
Hand of Glory, by Laird Barron.




http://resources.macmillanusa.com/jackets/186W/9780312644741.jpg



From the creator of Hellboy, Father Gaetano's Puppet Catechism by Mike Mignola and Christopher Golden is an illustrated novella that brings Twilight Zone originality to the written page.

In the aftermath of a critical World War II battle, Father Gaetano is assigned as the sole priest at the Church of San Domenico in the small, seaside Sicilian village of Tringale. The previous pastor has died and there is a shortage of clergy at the moment, so until another can be spared, the young priest must say all of the masses himself.
Mass is not Father Gaetano’s only responsibility, however. The war has created many orphans, and thus the San Domenico rectory has been converted into an orphanage which is also his domain. The children are a joy to him, but they have lost so much, and many have begun to question their faith and their God, and his attempts to teach them catechism are in vain . . . until he finds an old puppet theatre and an ornate box of puppets in the basement. Handcrafted by the building's former caretaker, now absent, the puppets seem the perfect tool to get the children to pay attention to their lessons. But after dark the puppets emerge from that ornate box, without their strings. While the children have been questioning their faith, the puppets believe Father Gaetano's Bible stories completely. But there is such a thing as too much faith. And the children's lives will never be the same again.

Michael
09-20-2012, 08:56 PM
Been looking forward to Book of Cthulu 2. Loved volume one, so was psyched when I first heard this was coming out. Glad it's here now.

bendk
09-27-2012, 05:46 AM
TERROR TALES OF
EAST ANGLIA
edited by PAUL FINCH

http://www.grayfriarpress.com/images/cat_eanglia.jpg

East Anglia - a drear, flat land of fens and broads, lone gibbets and isolated cottages, where demon dogs howl in the night, witches and warlocks lurk at every crossroads, and corpse-candles burn in the marshland ...

The giggling horror of Dagworth
The wandering torso of Hippisburgh
The vile apparaition at Wicken
The slavering beast of Rendlesham
The faceless evil on Wallasea
The killer hounds of Southery
The dark guardian of Wandlebury

And more chilling tales by Alison Littlewood, Reggie Oliver, Roger Johnson, Steve Duffy and other award-winning masters and mistresses of the macabre.



The book contains ten works of original horror fiction set in East Anglia, and three classic reprints. It also features the usual anecdotal tales concerning supposedly true incidents of East Anglian terror.

Loose by Paul Meloy & Gary Greenwood
The Most Haunted House in England
Deep Water by Christopher Harman
Murder in the Red Barn
The Watchmanby Roger Johnson
The Woman in Brown
Shuck by Simon Bestwick
The Witchfinder-General
The Marsh Warden by Steve Duffy
Beware the Lantern Man!
The Fall of the King of Babylon by Mark Valentine
The Weird in the Wood
Double Space by Gary Fry
The Dagworth Mystery
Wicken Fen by Paul Finch
Boiled Alive
Wolferton Hall by James Doig
The Wandering Torso
Aldeburgh by Johnny Mains
The Killer Hounds of Southery
Like Suffolk, Like Holidays by Alison Littlewood
The Demon of Wallasea Island
The Little Wooden Box by Edward Pearce
[I]The Dark Guardian of Wandlebury
The Spooks of Shellborough by Reggie Oliver

bendk
10-13-2012, 12:09 AM
http://www.chizinepub.com/images/covers/remember_cover.jpg





http://www.chizinepub.com/books/remember-why-you-fear-me.php

Freyasfire
10-14-2012, 11:48 AM
http://www.grayfriarpress.com/images/cat_eternity.jpg

Introduction by Ramsey Campbell
FROM HELL . . .
Where shadows speak from the depths of a haunted sea.
Where a little girl’s obsession conjures a terrible bogeyman.
Where a woman’s body becomes her own worst enemy.
. . . TO ETERNITY
Where familiar places harbour ancient evil.
Where a dinner party descends into blood, sex, madness and death.
Where a camera can steal more than your very soul.
Enter the strange and disturbing world of Thana Niveau, where fear reigns eternal, and nightmares last forever; where your only refuge is madness and there is always something waiting in the dark.
Won't you join her?
Gray Friar Press is proud to present sixteen tales of supernatural horror from a new Mistress of the Macabre.


GRAY FRIAR PRESS: by Thana Niveau (http://www.grayfriarpress.com/catalogue/eternity.html)

mark_samuels
10-17-2012, 07:06 PM
Thana Niveau is an excellent author, and requires the close attention of each and every devotee of weird literature. I strongly suspect her work will endure as a very worthy contribution to this ongoing tradition of wonder and terror. She has an imagination of such power and a grasp of the dynamics and history of our field that makes her deserving of the utmost respect.

Mark S.

MadsPLP
10-19-2012, 02:21 AM
What little I've read by Thana Niveau has been of a superlative quality. A shame about the cover, though. One of her stories (the one from the Ewers anthology) is in vol. 23 of The Mammoth Book of Best Horror, which has recently been released.

Two books received from PS Publishing the other day; books which might be of interest here.

http://www.pspublishing.co.uk/ekmps/shops/appleworld/images/where-furnaces-burn-hc-joel-lane-1415-p%5Bekm%5D244x300%5Bekm%5D.jpg

Joel Lane: Where Furnaces Burn

ISBN 978-1-848634-85-5

SYNOPSIS

Episodes from the casebook of a police officer in the West Midlands:
A young woman needs help in finding the buried pieces of her lover... so he can return to waking life.
Pale-faced thieves gather by a disused railway to watch a puppet theatre of love and violence.
Why do local youths keep starting fires in the ash woods around a disused mine in the Black Country?
A series of inexplicable deaths lead the police to uncover a secret cult of machine worship.
When a migrant worker disappears, the key suspect is a boy driven mad by memories that are not his own.
Among the derelict factories and warehouses at the heart of the city, an archaic god seeks out his willing victims.
Blurring the occult detective story with urban noir fiction, Where Furnaces Burn offers a glimpse of the myths and terrors buried within the industrial landscape.
“Joel Lane has quietly and prolifically built up a body of work that has brilliantly chronicled lives led in the wastelands of the UK, as well as charting some of the awful territories that exist within all of us.” – Conrad Williams

BIO
Joel Lane ['s] [...] Forthcoming projects include This Spectacular Darkness, a book of essays on classic weird fiction authors; The Anniversary of Never, a collection of metaphysical ghost stories; and Black Label, a crime novel about bootleg alcohol. The stories in Where Furnaces Burn were written over thirteen years. One of them, 'My Stone Desire', won the British Fantasy Award for best short story in 2008. Two others, 'Still Water' and 'Black Country', appeared in the Best New Horror series edited by Stephen Jones; another, 'The Receivers', appeared in the Year's Best Fantasy and Horror series edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling.


http://www.pspublishing.co.uk/ekmps/shops/appleworld/images/leave-your-sleep-hc-r.-b.-russell-1408-p%5Bekm%5D92x130%5Bekm%5D.jpg

(sorry about the size, but the only other pictures I could find were monstrously big.)

R.B. Russell: Leave Your Sleep.

ISBN 978-1-848633-25-4

SYNOPSIS

If only we would take the time to look a little closer, delve a little deeeper, when ordinary life goes awry, we might find the world more strange and unexpected than we ever could have imagined...

Following on from Literary Remains, R.B. Russell’s previous collection for PS Publishing, the twelve stories of Leave Your Sleep concern sex and death, love and loss. Russell allows his characters to disappear, slip into alternate realities, or re-write their own histories. They find they are able to do the most extraordinary things, even though they may not immediately realise it. And who is in control of their actions, or those around them?

In ‘An Unconventional Exorcism’, why is a young woman who claims to talk to the dead so shocked when her aunt comes back to haunt her? In ‘The Red Rose and the Cross of Gold’, when an engineer in a crumbling city stumbles upon a messy murder, who cleans up afterwards? And in ‘Mathilde’, what do lovers do when everyone is against their relationship? These and other questions are explored in Russell’s beautifully evocative prose.

CONTENTS


An Unconventional Exorcism
The Red Rose and the Cross of Gold
Leave Your Sleep
The Restaurant San Martín
Another Perspective
The Dress
A Woman of the Party
Mathilde
A False Impression
Gala Gladkov’s Exquisite Process
Reunion
The Beautiful Room

BIO

R. B. Russell is an English author, born in Sussex, who has a fondness for old books and vinyl records. He has had published the short story collections Putting the Pieces in Place and Literary Remains, along with the novella Bloody Baudelaire. An omnibus collection of his work was recently published as Ghosts, along with a CD of his music under the same title.

Russell is co-proprietor of the independent publishing house Tartarus Press, and now lives in the Yorkshire Dales with his partner, the writer and publisher Rosalie Parker, their son, and two cats.

Joel
10-19-2012, 03:09 AM
Thanks, Mads. I should clarify that the list of my 'forthcoming' works refers to works in progress, not books completed and lined up for publication – careless phrasing on my part.

MadsPLP
10-19-2012, 04:41 AM
Thanks, Mads. I should clarify that the list of my 'forthcoming' works refers to works in progress, not books completed and lined up for publication – careless phrasing on my part.

Ah, well ... one could hope.

How far in progress are they? I'm especially interested in the essays (though I'm interested in all three).

Joel
10-19-2012, 07:12 AM
A working draft of the book of ghost stories exists but new work will be added to improve it. I'm writing the book of essays on the instalment plan and am halfway there, want to do two or three more essays for Wormwood and then take a couple of years off fiction writing to complete the book. But each chapter involves lots of re-reading so it will take a while. I'm still gathering notes for the novel and planning it, so that's a way off. The word 'forthcoming' was an expression of my irrepressible optimism (like the books themselves).

Nemonymous
10-19-2012, 10:07 AM
Thana Niveau is an excellent author, and requires the close attention of each and every devotee of weird literature. I strongly suspect her work will endure as a very worthy contribution to this ongoing tradition of wonder and terror. She has an imagination of such power and a grasp of the dynamics and history of our field that makes her deserving of the utmost respect.

Mark S.

I recently announced that I am retiring from real-time reviewing, having done it solidly for four years.
In view of above comments, perhaps I should do just one more?

bendk
12-17-2012, 02:38 PM
A few that look promising.


http://evileyebooks.blogspot.com/#!/ (http://evileyebooks.blogspot.com/#%21/)


http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-BDgNviL3jAY/ThsNN8nTGiI/AAAAAAAACdo/GTe9jzcRz_4/s400/never_bet_the_devil_Orrin_Grey_Evileye_Books.jpg (http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-BDgNviL3jAY/ThsNN8nTGiI/AAAAAAAACdo/GTe9jzcRz_4/s1600/never_bet_the_devil_Orrin_Grey_Evileye_Books.jpg)




http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-uI4RZ7SL_k8/UEYUsOzXiuI/AAAAAAAADDs/dP6owChqfPY/s400/TBM-01--Cover-eBook-Master.jpg (http://goo.gl/RsLSt)



http://lazyfascistpress.com/ (http://lazyfascistpress.com/)



http://lazyfascist.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/a-pretty-mouth-front-cover-final.jpg?w=490&h=768


http://lazyfascist.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/aparliamentofcrowsjacket.jpg?w=490&h=367

MagnusTC
12-26-2012, 11:44 AM
Atlas Press recently published The Living Are Few, The Dead Many by Hans Henny Jahnn. The new collection includes three of Jahnn's 13 Uncanny Tales as well as his novel The Night of Lead. Recommended!

http://www.atlaspress.co.uk/img/eclectics13.jpg

Eclectics Heteroclites 13 - The Living Are Few, The Dead Many - Hans Henny Jahnn (http://www.atlaspress.co.uk/index.cgi?action=view_eclectic&number=13)

Brendan Moody
07-22-2013, 10:16 AM
Not really a new horror book any more, because I took so long reviewing the copy I was sent, but I think some might enjoy Ennis Drake's short novel 28 Teeth of Rage (http://omniumgatherumbooks.com/books/28-teeth-of-rage/). It has a blurb from Laird Barron, and reads like an interesting mix of Barron's high-octane Lovecraftianism and Stephen King's visceral/psychological stories. My review is here (http://noondaystars.blogspot.com/2013/07/28-teeth-of-rage.html).

bendk
07-26-2013, 06:05 AM
I don't know if this one has been mentioned yet. Still a ways off, slated for early 2014.


http://ic.pics.livejournal.com/ellen_datlow/8227324/10764/10764_300.jpg

This is a reprint anthology with one original novelette by John Langan. Interior illustrations by John Coulthart.



Table of Contents

Only the End of the World Again by Neil Gaiman
Bulldozer by Laird Barron
Red Goat Black Goat by Nadia Bulkin
The Same Deep Waters as You by Brian Hodge
A Quarter to Three by Kim Newman
The Dappled Thing by William Browning Spencer
Inelastic Collisions by Elizabeth Bear
Remnants by Fred Chappell
Love is Forbidden, We Croak & Howl by Caitlín R. Kiernan
The Sect of the Idiot by Thomas Ligotti
Jar of Salts by Gemma Files
Black is the Pit From Pole to Pole by Howard Waldrop and Steven Utley
Waiting at the Crossroads Motel by Steve Rasnic Tem
I’ve Come to Talk with you Again by Karl Edward Wagner
The Bleeding Shadow by Joe R. Lansdale
That of Which We Speak When We Speak of the Unspeakable by Nick Mamatas
Haruspicy by Gemma Files
Children of the Fang by John Langan

shivering
07-26-2013, 10:51 PM
It's not new, but does anyone have some thoughts on Jordan Krall's Penetralia? Sounds interesting.

bendk
07-27-2013, 12:25 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auBLlMKLIvI



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yc11OulbfBo



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yqdiFvBZ9fQ

Derek
11-12-2013, 07:27 AM
The Mabinogion meets The Necronomicon?

Cthulhu Cymraeg, Lovecraftian Tales from Wales; ed. Mark Howard Jones; Screaming Dreams Press; Oct 2013.

Haven't read this yet, but a solid set list of contributors, like JL Probert, Rhys Hughes etc. Intro by ST Joshi.

Cthulhu Cymraeg: Mark Howard Jones, Kate Evans: 9781906652210: Amazon.com: Books

Nemonymous
02-04-2014, 02:46 AM
My review of this DarkFuse book here: http://dflewisreviews.wordpress.com/2014/02/03/menace-gary-fry/

http://dflewisreviews.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/image.jpg?w=450&h=401 (http://dflewisreviews.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/image.jpg)

Brendan Moody
03-10-2014, 03:02 PM
I've just read The Frangipani Hotel, the debut collection by Violet Kupersmith. The marketing for this book emphasizes its "literary" side, but make no mistake: these are ghost stories every bit as chilling as what you'd find in a collection from a genre publisher. Kupersmith writes about America, Vietnam, and the dark bond history has forged between the two, but there's a bleakness to her work that's larger than its specific subject, a sense of how the ghost story can speak to a larger pessimism about the human condition. In overall atmosphere, it's somewhat reminiscent of Glen Hirshberg. My review is here (http://www.amazon.com/review/R235DV7HNWK2F/).

Hideous Name
03-11-2014, 07:58 PM
The Lord Came at Twilight by Daniel Mills (http://darkrenaissance.com/product/the-lord-came-at-twilight)
http://darkrenaissance.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/lord_ivory_cover_fit.jpg

Burnt Black Suns by Simon Strantzas (http://www.hippocampuspress.com/mythos-and-other-authors/fiction/burnt-black-suns-by-simon-strantzas)
http://www.hippocampuspress.com/bmz_cache/9/932eaff804edb21731d97905e819a863.image.179x250.jpg

Michael
03-12-2014, 11:22 AM
I looked at Simon's website like a few weeks ago and never saw Burnt Suns, was totally unaware this was coming out. Then I saw Hippocampus's site yesterday and bought it. Was I just WAY off my game or did others miss it?

Nemonymous
03-12-2014, 11:35 AM
I looked at Simon's website like a few weeks ago and never saw Burnt Suns, was totally unaware this was coming out. Then I saw Hippocampus's site yesterday and bought it. Was I just WAY off my game or did others miss it?

Not heard of it before, but just bought it as a result of this thread.

Masonwire
03-12-2014, 11:39 AM
I looked at Simon's website like a few weeks ago and never saw Burnt Suns, was totally unaware this was coming out. Then I saw Hippocampus's site yesterday and bought it. Was I just WAY off my game or did others miss it?

You can find it here: http://strantzas.com/burnt-black-suns/

nomis
03-12-2014, 01:25 PM
I looked at Simon's website like a few weeks ago and never saw Burnt Suns, was totally unaware this was coming out. Then I saw Hippocampus's site yesterday and bought it. Was I just WAY off my game or did others miss it?

It was officially announced on Saturday, Michael.

matt cardin
03-12-2014, 01:38 PM
Absolutely too cool, Simon. And what an amazing surround of high-level endorsement: intro from Laird, blurbs from Ligotti, Straub, Nevill. I can't wait to read the book.

nomis
03-12-2014, 01:47 PM
Absolutely too cool, Simon. And what an amazing surround of high-level endorsement: intro from Laird, blurbs from Ligotti, Straub, Nevill. I can't wait to read the book.

I think you're really going to dig this one, Matt.

njhorror
03-12-2014, 01:49 PM
I ordered it. Sounds good.

bendk
03-12-2014, 02:06 PM
I have been looking forward to Simon's new book ever since S.T. Joshi gave it a glowing endorsement on one of Wilum's videos. He said it was one of the best collections he has read in years. And look at that gorgeous cover by Santiago Caruso!

The Lord Came at Twilight by Daniel Mills is also a must for me. Great cover art there too.

It looks to be a good year for horror literature.

Freyasfire
03-13-2014, 10:12 AM
I was super excited when I heard about Simon's upcoming book from Laird Barron's blog! That is the best kind of literary surprise: not only hearing about a new book by an author you love, but also finding that it will be released very soon, AND will not be ultra limited and hard to obtain. Can't wait to read it!

Sam
03-13-2014, 12:04 PM
So many great books coming up! THE LORD CAME AT TWILIGHT and of course BURNT BLACK SUNS are both hotly anticipated around my domicile.

Also due soon is ANA KAI TANGATA (http://www.fedoganandbremer.com/products/ana-kai-tangata), the debut collection from Scott Nicolay (http://turquoisedog.blogspot.com/).

http://i.imgur.com/j9Llcl5.jpg

Scott contributed the excellent "Eyes Exchange Bank" to THE GRIMSCRIBE'S PUPPETS (http://miskatonicriverpress.com/products/gp.shtml), and has stories in Strange Aeons (http://cosmicomicon.blogspot.com/2013/03/strange-aeons-issue-10-available-for.html) and The Lovecraft eZine (http://lovecraftzine.com/magazine/issues/2012-2/issue-16-july-2012/in-the-tank-by-scott-nicolay/). He also has a story in the upcoming Laird Barron tribute THE CHILDREN OF OLD LEECH (http://wordhorde.com/the-children-of-old-leech-are-coming/), and in fact Laird wrote the introduction for Scott's book. It will be illustrated by David Verba (http://www.davidverbagallery.com/), and is currently up for pre-order from publisher Fedogan & Bremer in regular hardcover (http://www.fedoganandbremer.com/products/ana-kai-tangata) and deluxe limited (http://www.fedoganandbremer.com/products/ana-kai-tangata-deluxe-limited) editions.

This is a big book, as some of the stories are novella-length. I have greatly enjoyed everything I've read from Scott so far, and I have no doubt this will be a brutally beautiful read!

mgriffin
03-13-2014, 02:01 PM
I'm really looking forward to Scott Nicolay's book, too, and expect it will be much discussed later this year.

The cover image posted by Sam is not quite final. The text ended up being white rather than black with yellow drop shadow. The art is the same, of course.

bendk
04-04-2014, 09:28 PM
Not exactly new as these were published by Ramble House more than a year ago, but I somehow missed them. I have wanted to read these (especially Freak Museum) ever since they were listed in Karl Edward Wagner's famous "39 Best Horror Novels" list in The Twilight Zone Magazine.

(Book descriptions by Ramble House.)


http://www.ziesings.com/pictures/50887.jpg (http://www.google.kz/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&frm=1&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&docid=NSxxnm-JqFmCYM&tbnid=tsliV8coSFxa6M:&ved=0CAUQjRw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ziesings.com%2Fpages%2Fbooks% 2F50887%2Fr-r-ryan%2Fthe-subjugated-beast&ei=gwI4U_voF9XNsQSKiYDgBg&psig=AFQjCNFxjtP_VNc9_IpQVOTgJjaVFYvYdw&ust=1396265697123334)


A legendary rarity, The Subjugated Beast is not simply a literary curiosity, but a true masterpiece of the genre, years ahead of its time. Denice Jeanette Bradley-Ryan writing as R.R. Ryan and Kay Seaton deserves to be thought of as one of the true masters of the weird novel and perhaps even the "Godmother of Splatterpunk". The Subjugated Beast easily stands with modern masterpieces like Richard Laymon's The Cellar, Ray Garton's Live Girls, Edward Lee's Creekers and other masterpieces of cutting edge horror; however, Ms. Bradley-Ryan was authoring these books over seventy years ago! Of her body of work, The Subjugated Beast stands out as the most unsettling, definitely not for the weak of heart!



http://i43.tower.com/images/mm123666586/freak-museum-r-r-ryan-paperback-cover-art.jpg


A legendary rarity, Freak Museum was first published in London in 1938 and it was assumed that many copies were destroyed when the bombs began to fall. Virtually unobtainable for over seventy years, Freak Museum is a classic of the macabre worthy of a place beside such masterpieces of Gothic terror as J.U. Nicolson's Finger's of Fear, John Farris' All Heads Turn When the Hunt Goes By, and Bruno Fischer's House of Flesh. Freak Museum is not for the faint-hearted!

The Mystery of the identity of "R.R. Ryan" has been around since the 50s and his introduction, John Pelan lays out the evidence for a definitive solution.

Hideous Name
08-07-2014, 04:59 PM
Unseaming: Mike Allen, Laird Barron: 9780988912410: Amazon.com: Books

"Throughout Unseaming, reality is usually in bad shape right from the start-and from there things proceed to go downhill. Such is the general background and trajectory of life in Mike Allen's fictional world. More could be said, of course, but there's one thing that I feel especially urged to say: these stories are fun. Not "good" fun, and certainly not "good clean" fun. They are too unnerving for those modifiers, too serious, like laughter in the dark-unnerving, serious laughter that leads you through Mr. Allen's funhouse. The reality in there is also in bad shape, deliberately so, just for the seriously unnerving fun of it. The prose is poetic, except it's nonsense poetry, the poetry of deteriorating realities, intermingling realities, realities without Reality. And all the while that unnerving, serious laughter keeps getting louder and louder. Are we having fun yet?"
--Thomas Ligotti, author of Teatro Grottesco and The Spectral Link

bendk
08-08-2014, 02:12 AM
I got this over at Matt's site The Teeming Brain. Lovecraft fans and bibliophiles should like this one.


https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSRhLidk4YMLUcMrCEv_4lY3RigHAndf pi6MwE71UNPKQ9mAFJ4 (http://www.google.kz/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&docid=ux50EKktlkzxbM&tbnid=KFe7UFRbDpvIxM:&ved=0CAUQjRw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fstarrywisdomlibrary.com%2F&ei=OWnkU5njPJSAygTJt4LIBQ&psig=AFQjCNGjMcDJ4VpFTOQMnSfgenKQu8vtoQ&ust=1407564470170772)


The Starry Wisdom Library
The Catalogue of the Greatest Occult Book Auction of All Time

http://www.teemingbrain.com/

It was difficult for me to find more info at PS Publishing, but if you do an Advanced Google Image Search for "Starry Wisdom Library" it will direct you to some of the pages of art.