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When_MP_Attacks
08-25-2010, 11:12 PM
Do-Gooders Are Unpopular Team Members

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2010/08/do-gooder-dislike/

gveranon
08-25-2010, 11:57 PM
From The Onion:

Report: 10 Million Killed Annually By Stepping Out of Comfort Zones. (http://www.theonion.com/articles/report-10-million-killed-annually-by-stepping-out,17949/)

The good news: "The safest individuals were those who surrendered to the soul-crushing monotony of habit and then convinced themselves that they had things pretty good."

Nemonymous
08-26-2010, 05:11 AM
"Let us eat, drink and be merry, for tomorrow we die" (Luke 12:19 and 1Cor 15:32).

sundog
08-26-2010, 06:13 PM
"It's the great mystery of human life that old grief passes gradually into quiet tender joy."

— Father Zosima in Dostoevsky's 'The Brothers Karamazov'.


( methought that old grief passed into quiet restless bitterness. )

gveranon
08-26-2010, 07:20 PM
From a 1975 interview with Jorge Luis Borges by Willis Barnstone:

A man came up to us [on a street in Buenos Aires] and rhetorically addressed Borges, seizing his hand and shaking it furiously. "Borges, you are immortal."

"Don't be a pessimist, Sir," Borges gently replied.

Daisy
08-27-2010, 10:53 AM
Our whole “existence” is a striving for the positive state.

-- Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned (1919)

Cnev
08-27-2010, 04:07 PM
"For small creatures such as we the vastness is bearable only through love."

-Carl Sagan

Russell Nash
08-29-2010, 10:51 AM
"An optimist is a guy that has never had much experience."

Certain maxims of archy, Donal Robert Perry Marquis

Russell Nash
08-31-2010, 09:03 AM
"How much better to endure whatever comes, whether Jupiter grants us additional winters or whether this is our last, which now wears out the Tuscan Sea upon the barrier of the cliffs! Be wise, strain the wine; and since life is brief, prune back far-reaching hopes! Even while we speak, envious time has passed: pluck the day, putting as little trust as possible in tomorrow!"


Ode I-XI “Carpe Diem”, Quintus Horatius Flaccus

Viva June
09-25-2010, 06:41 AM
A passage from Ulrich Horstmann's excellent Der lange Schatten der Melancholie (The Long Shadow of Melancholy):
Thus melancholy is born of wastelands and makes them bearable, even familiar and beautiful. Its affiliates are virtuosos of loss who have nothing to lose except precisely this dearly acquired virtuosity—the ability to squeeze from every ruin the smug comfort of disillusion, from every downfall the conciliation of the "better that way"[.]
If you think this makes no sense at all, please blame me and my poor translation skills rather than Horstmann himself.

(By the way, I like how this thread is not in the quotations subforum because optimism is apparently off-topic.)

sundog
11-11-2012, 06:26 AM
"He heard the voice in the bones speak of something different than it had before. What it told him was not the hopelessness of being shackled to this world. Instead, the voice awoke in him the memory of another time or another place that had not been so abused by changes. Nothing of the kind had ever entered his thoughts, so far as he could recall. (...) Maybe there was a way out.. the ultimate change by which he could leave all changes and never return. Not an unending existence of changes but a changeless oblivion. (...) Once it had been a fearful thought, something to be changed - non-being. Over eons the fear had been eradicated, and then the thought itself. (...) Joyous of his new-found mortality, he walked to the window and bounded across its ledge. Now it was over for him. One day it would be over for all, that terrible dream of everlasting changes that held us to a place that never should have been if its greatest intention led only to wallowing in the muck of eternity."

- THE VOICE IN THE BONES, T. Ligotti.

When_MP_Attacks
05-30-2013, 10:20 PM
Accustom yourself to believing that death is nothing to us, for good and evil imply the capacity for sensation, and death is the privation of all sentience; therefore a correct understanding that death is nothing to us makes the mortality of life enjoyable, not by adding to life a limitless time, but by taking away the yearning after immortality.
- Epicurus