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barrywood
09-08-2005, 02:03 PM
Lately I've been in contact with a fellow who collects fountain pens -- limited to five, he tells me but hopes to collect more. (Perhaps this member will post more of his hobby.) At first I thought that was a curious hobby indeed, but it actually goes hand in hand with my hobby of writing handwritten letters in pencil or ink. I have several letters and things I've received from people all over the world and the greatest thrill is to reach into my mailbox to read something handwritten from someone far or near -- and if there's stamps on the envelope it's a MAJOR bonus.

Usually when I write a letter to an author for instance, I write it as I think about it and I never reread the letter before it's mailed. I consider my letter writing a hobby but also an art. (So if anyone wants to write me a handwritten letter, please private message me and I'll give you my address.)

What are your hobbies?

The Silent One
09-08-2005, 03:45 PM
Writing, listening to music, the computer, fencing, etc.

G. S. Carnivals
09-08-2005, 05:10 PM
Barry,
I'd like to claim carving scrimshaw with my eyes closed as a hobby, but I'd be lying.... I collect vintage crime paperbacks (the art!), obsess with film noir, and constantly search for a new variation on the hangover.
Phil

crawling chaos
09-08-2005, 06:55 PM
I like painting, of course, reading... I also like collecting knives, swords, and edge weapons, lately I also like playing videogames online, but since I am working fulltime, I really have to calculate my time carefully....
I also like horror comic books and horror movies.

ventriloquist
09-08-2005, 08:30 PM
Phil,
What are some of your favorite film noirs? (films noir?) I really enjoy them, but even with my expensive film school education, I'm still not as well versed in them as I'd like to be, so I'm curious about some good and lesser-known noirs. I'd say "The Third Man" is my favorite noir, but I also enjoy the hokier stuff, like "Detour." I'd appreciate any recommendations!

Back on topic...

I try to write a little bit every day (finishing anything is a whole other story.) And, as I said, I'm a movie lover, though I don't watch 'em as often as I used to.

My main hobby, I suppose, is music. I collect dance music 12"s, mostly synth disco and electro from the early '80s (16th note basslines and vocoded vocals abound!) I sometimes endeavor to mix these records, but I can't claim to be very good in the DJing department.

To add to the list of schizophrenic interests, I also enjoy watching baseball quite a bit, even though I don't really like any other sports and was one of those moody kids in high school who hated on all the jocks. :)

barrywood
09-08-2005, 08:49 PM
crawling chaos, do you own a Barry Wood knife?

Barry

AlectoSpleen
09-08-2005, 09:21 PM
ventriloquist,

What sort of films do you generally watch? (besides film noir :) ) Do you have any favorite directors? Based on your avatar, we share an appreciation for the Quay Brothers. :)
I have been contemplating going to film school for awile... probably majoring in cinematography (my main interest is directing, like everybody else I'm sure :P But it seems that the job market is probably wider in cinematography :P ). However I just finished a course in animation a couple years ago and am kinda hesitant to spend the money for more school.

I guess my main hobbies would revolve around the arts. Primarily I enjoy sculpting (clay, stone, and wood), but a good amount of my time is also spent working on music and writing. I suppose drawing/painting could be added to the list as well, but currently its more of a profession than a hobby : \

The Silent One
09-08-2005, 09:24 PM
Phil,
What are some of your favorite film noirs? (films noir?) I really enjoy them, but even with my expensive film school education, I'm still not as well versed in them as I'd like to be, so I'm curious about some good and lesser-known noirs. I'd say "The Third Man" is my favorite noir, but I also enjoy the hokier stuff, like "Detour." I'd appreciate any recommendations!

Back on topic...

I try to write a little bit every day (finishing anything is a whole other story.) And, as I said, I'm a movie lover, though I don't watch 'em as often as I used to.

My main hobby, I suppose, is music. I collect dance music 12"s, mostly synth disco and electro from the early '80s (16th note basslines and vocoded vocals abound!) I sometimes endeavor to mix these records, but I can't claim to be very good in the DJing department.

To add to the list of schizophrenic interests, I also enjoy watching baseball quite a bit, even though I don't really like any other sports and was one of those moody kids in high school who hated on all the jocks. :)
Très bien!

G. S. Carnivals
09-08-2005, 10:02 PM
Phil,
What are some of your favorite film noirs? (films noir?) I really enjoy them, but even with my expensive film school education, I'm still not as well versed in them as I'd like to be, so I'm curious about some good and lesser-known noirs.


Purely subjective, mind you, in no particular order:
Double Indemnity
Sunset Boulevard
Born to Kill (1947)
Gun Crazy (1950)
Leave Her to Heaven
The Letter
Scarlet Street
The Killing
The Dark Corner
Kiss Me Deadly
etc.

ventriloquist
09-08-2005, 11:27 PM
AlectoSpleen,

I enjoy the Quays very much, as well as Jan Svankmajer, though my knowledge of outré animation pretty much begins and ends with them. Do you know of any other good animators with a similar sensibility?

I entered film school wanting to be a director, as well, but one of my early productions came apart at the seams and I never finished the class, and wound up focusing on film studies largely out of laziness and spite. :) So yeah, save your pennies and make sure it's something you really want to do, because there are few things worse than being in charge of a chaotic film set when your entire crew consists of other film students. :wink:

As for my own taste, I really like too many things to mention! My favorite director is probably Andrei Tarkovsky, perhaps an even more pretentious choice than I would've made when I was 17 (Ingmar Bergman). But "Andrei Rublev," "Stalker," "Mirror"... all his films are like spiritual kicks to the gut, in a good way. Another art film I love is Bertolucci's "Il Conformista," which is rare, but just came out on a new print in NYC, so hopefully a DVD release isn't far behind. But I run the gamut. I like German Expressionism and "The Big Lebowski." "Trouble in Paradise" and "Pink Flamingos." Hammer horror and Hal Hartley. On and on. It doesn't matter what genre a film is, or if it's "high" or "low" art, as long as it feels like the truth to me.

And Phil, thanks for the suggestions! I've seen a couple of those; "Double Indemnity" was particularly good, I thought. But I'll keep an eye out for the others.

eldritch00
09-09-2005, 04:16 AM
Lately I've been in contact with a fellow who collects fountain pens -- limited to five, he tells me but hopes to collect more. (Perhaps this member will post more of his hobby.)

And this fellow be me. Okay, now that I've butchered the English language that way...

Like Barry said, it's not really much of a collection per se. The real hardcore pen collectors have hundreds. That said, I do use these pens a great deal, and I don't remember the last time I used anything other than a fountain pen. My students have learned that if I have to sign one of their papers, they have to stand patiently and wait for me to take out my pen, unscrew the cap, etc. :lol:

The Silent One: Fencing! That's fabulous, and no, I'm not a fencer myself, but another author I really like (very un-Ligotti in his writings though) is Tim Powers, and I know he fences a great deal, so you can sort of see that in his descriptions in a novel like The Drawing of the Dark.

G.S. Carnivals: Collecting vintage crime paperbacks is something I'm not able to do, but I do like reading noir fiction a great deal, and usually in the newer editions that come out.

In fact, aside from Thomas Ligotti, the other writer who I cite as one of my favorites of all time is Cornell Woolrich. And thank goodness I have a friend with copies of his books to lend me, because there really needs to be more of this guy published (aside from a couple of new collections which have been published in recent years and the Modern Library reissue of Rendezvous in Black).

As for films, I just have to throw in a vote for Out of the Past, which I personally consider quintessential noir.

This is quite an interesting thread with even more interesting responses. I have plans to go to film school, but not production. I'm really more interested in cinema studies--that wonderfully egghead world of theory and criticism. At the moment, I've been doing a lot of reading on my own to prepare for my classes, but because there's pressure on me to get a higher degree, I really should be a bit more serious in checking out where to go for this one (I have my eye on the University of Chicago, because of their focus on modernity and early cinema).

And oh, someone mentioned Hal Hartley. God, I love Hartley. "Surviving Desire" is an example of a film for me that's a perfect blend between its form and content. And German Expressionism...and Tarkovsky (who I should see more of)...The Big Lebowski...early 80s dance music...man, this is fabulous!

bendk
09-09-2005, 08:29 AM
The only things I accumulate (I would hesitate to call myself a collector, because I don't really care about the condition of items as long as I can enjoy them) are illustrated books and pulp fiction magazines of the 30s and 40s. Mostly hero pulp magazines like The Shadow, The Spider, and Doc Savage, but also an occasional horror pulp like Weird Tales, Horror Stories, and Terror Tales. And those Spicy pulps.

As for hobbies, I like movies, books, and listening to old time radio shows. I have quite a few old radio shows on mp3 like Suspense, The Whistler, The Shadow, and many horror programs. Just the other day I listened to a few Lovecraft adaptations from the show The Black Mass: "The Outsider" and "Rats in the Walls" performed by Erik Bauersfeld. If you haven't heard these you should try to hunt them down because they are great! Necronomicon Press used to sell them, but, sadly, don't any more. I am still looking for Bauersfled's "Haunter of the Dark." I also have one of those antique-looking radios with the lighted radio dial that you can insert a cassette tape. One memorable Halloween night, many years ago, I went to an old art house theatre and watched a reenactment of H.G. Wells' "War of the Worlds" performed by Kent State Radio. They even had a little band. It was a lot of fun. I have always been fascinated by the period of the 30s and 40s. Speaking of which, I love the film noir movies too. Some of my favorites that have not already been listed are:

The Bogey Noirs: Maltese Falcon, The Big Sleep, To Have and Have Not
The Killing - Kubrick's noir
The Asphalt Jungle w/Marilyn Monroe. "Why are you looking at me like that Uncle Lon?" omg
Cape Fear (I enjoy both versions)
Chinatown - TL has mentioned this flick.
After Dark, My Sweet w/Rachel Ward. (An underrated noir, in my opinion)
Against All Odds - Which is a loose remake of Out of the Past. Jane Greer is in it.

G. S. Carnivals
09-09-2005, 08:36 PM
Eldritch00,
I agree with many that Cornell Woolrich invented noir as we know it. He's still the best (pulp and all, but that was the market). My favorite decade for crime fiction is the 1950's. The writers of the period who've made the biggest impression on me are David Goodis, Jim Thompson, Charles Williams (no, not the fantasist; rather, the guy who wrote for Gold Medal and Dell), Chester Himes, and Charles Willeford. Fortunately, many titles (with the exception of Williams) have seen reprint in the last twenty years. Agreed, collecting originals is not a cheap hobby. I've some real beauties, though, especially the Williams....

Later, I'll post some noir resources that I've found helpful in enabling my obsession.

From The Black Curtain by Woolrich:
".... Blue shadows, like tentatively clutching fingers, began a slow creep toward Townsend out from under the trees.... One, the longest, boldest of them all, like an active agency trying to overtake him, to trap him fast there where he was, pointed itself straight across the path, advancing upon him by crafty, insidious degrees like a slithering octopus tentacle. He drew his foot hastily back out of its reach, as though it were something malign, with an intelligence of its own...."

unknown
09-10-2005, 01:34 PM
I buy stupidly large amounts of cds and books (some of the books I never even get around to reading). I have a lapel pin collection that is well over 100 pins. I've started a knife collection, but I can't let it grow too large lest the mother figure finds out. Movies are a big hobby of mine. I'd love to be a director. I listen to songs and I just get visions in my head. I'd probably do short films rather than full lengths, though.

G. S. Carnivals
09-10-2005, 03:46 PM
Books required for Noir 101:

Film Noir
Film Noir: An Encyclopedic Reference to the American Style edited by Alain Silver and Elizabeth Ward
The Dark Side of the Screen: Film Noir by Foster Hirsch
Death on the Cheap: The Lost B Movies of Film Noir by Arthur Lyons
Film Noir Reader edited by Alain Silver and James Ursini

Collectible books
Hardboiled America by Geoffrey O'Brien
Over My Dead Body: The Sensational Age of the American Paperback: 1945-1955 by Lee Server

Potpourri
The Big Book of Noir, edited by Ed Gorman, Lee Server, and Martin H. Greenberg.

bendk
09-10-2005, 06:21 PM
The only book I have ever read on film noir is DARK CITY: THE LOST WORLD OF FILM NOIR by Eddie Muller. And I really just browsed through it looking for movie ideas.

I went through a Cornell Woolrich phase years ago. It started when I read a review of his novel NIGHT HAS A THOUSAND EYES, which was selected for the book HORROR: 100 BEST BOOKS. I bought a few old books of his and read some of his short stories. I started the novel, but distinctly remember not being able to get into his style of writing. That has been quite a few years ago; I may feel differently now. I found the Ballantine pb on my shelf (much to my surprise) and Woolrich is given glowing reviews from Ray Bradbury, Ellery Queen, Robert Bloch, and Isaac Asimov. I have a nice copy of his book NIGHTWEBS somewhere. Quite a few of his stories were successfully adapted to film; most notably, REAR WINDOW.

I don't know enough about Woolrich's style to compare his writing to Ligotti's. And I don't recall TL ever mentioning him in any of his interviews. From what I have read about Woolrich's life, in the book FIRST YOU DREAM, THEN YOU DIE by Francis Nevins, he seemed to have lived a reclusive existence similar to TL.

eldritch00
09-10-2005, 11:27 PM
While I'm not a collector of knives myself, I'm rather intrigued to see that at least two (or even three, since Barry mentioned one which shares his name) are knife collectors. Knifey-wifey anyone? :twisted:

I agree with many that Cornell Woolrich invented noir as we know it. He's still the best (pulp and all, but that was the market). My favorite decade for crime fiction is the 1950's. The writers of the period who've made the biggest impression on me are David Goodis, Jim Thompson, Charles Williams (no, not the fantasist; rather, the guy who wrote for Gold Medal and Dell), Chester Himes, and Charles Willeford.

As you well know by now, I don't disagree with you at all about the first two statements you make here! Woolrich scholar Francis Nevins has written about how Woolrich's fiction develops from a pulp sensibility to a noir one, and although I enjoy the former, it's really the latter which resonates with me as strongly as Ligotti's work. Woolrich can do fast-paced pulpy action, but when he slows down later on and begins to almost meditate on "love and despair," oh wow. That's really fabulous work there.

I'm not familiar with Charles Williams the crime writer. I did confuse him at first with that other Charles Williams (and Race Williams!) who I have a story of but which I haven't read, from the Black Water anthology (http://www.locusmag.com/index/t6.html#A806).

The other writers you mention, however, are all known to me, thanks to the the LOA anthology of crime novels from the '50s (http://www.loa.org/volume.jsp?RequestID=2). I've read the Goodis and the Thompson and have been left very very much impressed. The friend who lent me Woolrich has never read Thompson (and so I've been telling him to read The Killer Inside Me and The Grifters), but he has lent me Goodis's Dark Passage and The Blonde on the Street Corner.

When I pick up this volume again, I'm reading the Willeford (he's a rather odd case, isn't it, in the sense that he may not be so well-known but there have been a couple of film adaptations of his work that, while not box-office hits, were given good reviews by the critics...Miami Blues and Dead Calm were adapted from his works, am I right?).

I bought both volumes of the LOA's Crime Novels anthologies, primarily for I Married a Dead Man from the earlier volume devoted to the '30s and '40s (http://www.loa.org/volume.jsp?RequestID=1), and while that remains an obvious highlight for me, I've always had a stronger interest in the works from the 50s, I guess.

My guess, and this is pure conjecture on my part, is that I feel '50s noir to be a bit more "subversive," at least in the sense that it was supposed to be a relatively much better decade in terms of the "American Dream." While noir from the '30s had the Depression to give them some kind of socio-cultural force, I always imagine the '50s noir writers being given some kind of quizzical look by a lot of people: "What are you all so bleak about?!" I admit that this seems more my imagination rather than actual research!

G. S. Carnivals
09-10-2005, 11:38 PM
Eldritch00,
Right on. '50s noir is so dark, I think, because it reflects the postwar disillusionment and disenfranchisement of many. Dead Calm was a Charles Williams novel! Not a bad film either.

eldritch00
09-10-2005, 11:51 PM
because it reflects the postwar disillusionment and disenfranchisement of many.

And you know, I've always imagined that this sense of dissatisfaction was constantly being either repressed or denied during that decade, what with the rise of suburbia, for example, as well as other aspects of "the American Dream. These are all secondary literature impressions (and ones that I hope aren't too far off) on my part, of course, but I've always understood it all in this fashion.

While no one could avoid dealing with the fact that the Great Depression and World War 2 were seriously troublesome and problematic events, the '50s seem to have given way to an optimism in mainstream society, which were being questioned from several sectors as diverse as noir fiction, science fiction films, the Beat writers, and rock and roll.

Thanks for the correction regarding Dead Calm; I've never read the book, but it is a pretty good movie. Totally deserving of critical accolades like "nail-biting" and "claustrophobic"! :lol:

eldritch00
09-11-2005, 12:05 AM
bendk, I'm probably not as seriously into old-time radio as you are, but I do have more than a passing interest in it, as I got into Woolrich, because a very good friend and colleague of mine made me listen to the Suspense! production of "I Won't Take a Minute."

I've been given a couple of Web sites where these files can be downloaded, as opposed to the majority of the sites which sell them in discs, so if you have more links for free listens, go right ahead and throw them our way.

Also, I have in fact toyed with the idea of working on a radio adaptation of a Ligotti story. His dialogue style strikes me as being remote enough from contemporary speaking rhythms that I think a radio drama might suit his works if it was done with that 30s-40s feel to it.

In any case, my first readings of Woolrich were Waltz into Darkness, which I became curious about because I was intrigued by the plot of Original Sin but wasn't sure if that should by my entry into Woolrich's world (barring Rear Window, of course, which I've already seen previously). The friend who lent me WiD also lent me a collection of Woolrich's first crime short stories called Darkness at Dawn.

I'm planning to work on a piece detailing comparisons and contrasts between Ligotti and Woolrich, similar to the exemplary work Matt Cardin has done with Lovecraft, so I'm glad to have you and Gas Station Carnivals as potential "peer readers" for it when it's finally done.

I don't think Ligotti has mentioned Woolrich either, and I'm not sure if he'd consider him a kindred spirit the way he mentions people like Poe, Lovecraft, Schulz, etc. (which is part of the challenge in trying to write about the two of them), but there are striking similarities, I think, and G.S. Carnivals's quote from The Black Curtain is one indication among many.

In the meantime, I can't resist your mention of The Night Has a Thousand Eyes, which was lent to me after that first pair of books and a few other collections of short fiction. At the risk of courting accusations of narcissism, in a fit of insomnia, I once started rambling on my LiveJournal about this novel, as well as several other bits of that dealt with the night. Feel free to read it by clicking here (http://www.livejournal.com/users/eldritch00/2004/02/17/), though I have to warn you that I think I wasn't at my most coherent state at the time I wrote that!

If you'll allow me to be presumptuous, I also mention Kafka there, and since I know you also consider him a literary interest, I hope that blog entry proves to be something you may want to read, as cursory as I may have been about all of it. And there's also a reference there made to an earlier blog entry I wrote that mentions Ligotti (http://www.livejournal.com/users/eldritch00/2003/10/01/).

P.S. Incidentally, if your Nightwebs is the Orion reprint from 2002, it's unfortunately missing the last four stories, but fear not, as it's still a pretty damn good collection.)

bendk
09-11-2005, 04:51 PM
A few disjointed comments.

eldritchoo,
Thanks for directing me to your blog, it was interesting. I am, indeed, a fan of Kafka's work.

I think some of TL's stories would make fine radio plays. I have read more than a few old radio show scripts and find them enjoyable. To bring something like that to fruition is beyond me. I think that is Dr. Locrian's area of expertise.

I would definitely look forward to reading your essay on Woolrich and Ligotti. I need to brush up on my Woolrich though.

I agree with you on your description of the idealistic 50s. The 50s noirs may be darker on the whole, but I can't think of a darker scene than a giggling Richard Widmark shoving an old lady in a wheel-chair down a flight of stairs in KISS OF DEATH 1947 (almost 1950s)

The only thing I ever read of Jim Thompson was THE KILLER INSIDE ME. I liked it. I always wanted to read Stephen King's introduction to the limited slipcase edition put out 1989. I like reading King's nonfiction, although I don't always agree with him. He is a very knowledgable individual and usually has something insightful to say.
"The Killer Inside Me is an American classic, no less, a novel which deserves space on the same shelf with Moby Dick, Huckleberry Finn, The Sun Also Rises, and As I Lay Dying."---Stephen King.

I've never read anything by Charles Willeford but I do have an old copy of WOMAN CHASER hiding somewhere in my apartment. I bought it after watching the hilarious 'noir farce' of the same name released in 2000. It stars Patrick Warburton (Puddy, from Seinfeld). I love this movie. I bet I've watched it half a dozen times.

G. S. Carnivals
09-11-2005, 07:34 PM
bendk,
The majority of Charles Willeford's novels are darkly humorous. The Woman Chaser is a good place to start. Willeford's title was The Director; you'll see why. Other gems include The Black Mass of Brother Springer (aka Honey Gal), Pick-Up, and The Burnt Orange Heresy(!). Cockfighter and Miami Blues have been filmed. Mr. Willeford is in Cockfighter, which stars Warren Oates and Harry Dean Stanton (recommendation enough). His short fiction was collected in The Machine in Ward Eleven and Everybody's Metamorphosis. He wrote poetry and non-fiction, too. Somebody I'd like to have quaffed a few beers with while smoking Kools!
Phil

eldritch00
09-12-2005, 03:06 AM
Regarding Willeford: Pick-Up is the only one I have from that LOA anthology. I've yet to read it, but it didn't seem very humorous to me, at least based on the blurb used on the book jacket to describe it. I think I may have seen a secondhand paperback of Miami Blues, but sadly, that was quite some time ago.

bendk:

If there was some easier way for a radio play collaboration among all of us adapting Ligotti's works, I'd love to be a part of that as well. It's the language, I think, that would come across really really well. But then, the practicalities might be a bit too much trouble.

Can you imagine what we could do with the collective first-person voice used in "The Shadow at the Bottom of the World"? All of us speaking in unison...that would sound rightfully eerie, I imagine. And the opening conversation of "The Tsalal," each of us speaking one line...

Matt's given me the go-signal for the essay, so I hope I get it written soon. Just don't expect it any time, but of course, you'll all be the first to read it when it's finally done.

The first thing I read of Thompson was The Grifters, which was pretty good (I enjoyed the film and that's what made me seek the book out). But The Killer Inside Me was just incredible. For some reason, I put off reading it, but when I finally got to it, good Lord. It was terrifying, and I'm not sure if it was the story itself or the way I was rooting for the main character.

(Cheers by the way to Stephen King's non-fiction as well. I generally think that too many people write him off just for being a commercial success, but he can still deliver something killer every so often, I think.)

I'm going to keep an eye out for that Patrick Warburton film. He's hilarious, even in those series of advertisements with Jerry Seinfeld where he voiced an animated Superman. American Express or Visa...I can't quite recall, but they were available for viewing online.

G. S. Carnivals
09-12-2005, 05:18 AM
Eldritch00,
The Pick-Up, The Burnt Orange Heresy, Cockfighter, and The Difference (an existential western) are quite serious works by Willeford. The Pick-Up is no pick-me-up. The sly humor creeps into some of his other works such as The Woman Chaser, High Priest of California, The Black Mass of Brother Springer, and the four Hoke Moseley novels, of which Miami Blues was the first.

bendk,
Would you not agree that the gibbering, maniacal Widmark was the original Jack Nicholson? See 1948's Road House for further evidence. Check out his cackle!

Knifeless in the Black Thread,
Phil

symbolique
09-12-2005, 10:02 PM
I was fortunate that what started out as a hobby many years ago turned into a profession, art/graphic design - though it has led into doing work that you definitely would not want to do as a hobby, being the corporate side of it, though I'm still involved in a lot of dark creative projects.

Collecting comics not the superhero stuff, Grant Morrison, Warren Ellis, Ashely Wood, Humanoids Publishing, Grendel and thousands more.

Books, like Unknown far too many and piled around my house due to constant lack of shelving, mostly artbooks, horror, graphic novels.

An unhealthy obsession of collecting the rare and extremely expensive music releases (beautifully constructed artwork and boxed packaging - Absinthe actually contained a real spoon for absinthe) from the french noise/ambient act Les Joyaux de la Princesse.

Egyptology, though more in the sense of it's indigenous roots these days helping Egyptologist, Moustafa Gadalla and the Tehuti Research Foundation break the academic patriarchal dominance that Abrahamic religions wield over the Baladi.

Tramping as many preserves around New Zealand as my wife and I are able.

Music, collecting it (thousands of CDs of dark folk, dark ambient, noise, weird rock, jazz) and I am a reviewer of dark ambient & folk for a magazine) and practising the guitar, and recording one's own music in my studio.

Cooking, I absolutely love experimenting with new foods, New Zealand has only really opened up to the vast foodstuffs the world has had access to in the last 5-8 years. Up until then it was very 'meat + 3 vege'.

Lastly I collect canes, preferably the older the better.

N/A
09-13-2005, 09:37 AM
Interesting to see some talk about noir here, I haven't read Woolrich, but his work has been recommended to me. As has stuff by Gil Brewer. For anyone w/an interest, there's a good site called Crime Culture, run by a woman named Lee Horsley, who wrote a very good book on noir called "The Noir Thriller". The site has a bit of an academic slant, but is very accessible and it covers a wide range of noir/crime literature and film:
http://www.crimeculture.com/

Also, at the risk of slipping into crass self-promotion I recently guest-edited a "weird noir" issue of a 'zine called Hardluck Stories:
http://www.hardluckstories.com/
-----
As for hobbies - art and photography - every now and then I'll go on a picture taking spree, mess around w/some graphic design or throw some paint at a canvas. I'm not very good at any of it, but that's never stopped me.

eldritch00
09-13-2005, 10:06 AM
symbiotique: Nice to see someone who's turned a hobby into a way of living, even if you do have to deal with the stodgy old corporate world, which I take from your "tone" (such as it were) isn't exactly very pleasant. The two interests of yours that I'm most fascinated in are:


Egyptology, though more in the sense of it's indigenous roots these days helping Egyptologist, Moustafa Gadalla and the Tehuti Research Foundation break the academic patriarchal dominance that Abrahamic religions wield over the Baladi.

...

Lastly I collect canes, preferably the older the better.

The latter is simply something I find charming in a nicely antiquarian way; how much would those old canes cost in comparison with new ones? You should post some pictures as I'd love to see them.

The former, however, I don't quite understand. It's my girlfriend who's into Egyptology, and I'd want to tell her about the kind of work you do here.


N/A: Neddal, is it? Thanks for the link to Crime Culture: that's exactly the kind of site I'm looking for, scholarly articles and all that.

(Although I have to confess that I did lapse a bit into some unwarranted sillyness when I read the name Lee Horsley and thought of that actor who played Matt Houston on 80s television:

http://www.russmccubbin.com/matt%20houston.jpg

Anyway, thanks too for reminding me about that "weird noir" issue you edited for Hardluck. You mentioned this somewhere, either Weirdmonger or Horrabin Hall, but it slipped my mind, so your "self-promotion" isn't crass at all and is very much welcome. (Besides, you were promoting the authors who submitted!)

Cheers, and thanks once again!

The Silent One
09-13-2005, 10:44 AM
I was fortunate that what started out as a hobby many years ago turned into a profession, art/graphic design - though it has led into doing work that you definitely would not want to do as a hobby, being the corporate side of it, though I'm still involved in a lot of dark creative projects.

Collecting comics not the superhero stuff, Grant Morrison, Warren Ellis, Ashely Wood, Humanoids Publishing, Grendel and thousands more.

Books, like Unknown far too many and piled around my house due to constant lack of shelving, mostly artbooks, horror, graphic novels.

An unhealthy obsession of collecting the rare and extremely expensive music releases (beautifully constructed artwork and boxed packaging - Absinthe actually contained a real spoon for absinthe) from the french noise/ambient act Les Joyaux de la Princesse.

Egyptology, though more in the sense of it's indigenous roots these days helping Egyptologist, Moustafa Gadalla and the Tehuti Research Foundation break the academic patriarchal dominance that Abrahamic religions wield over the Baladi.

Tramping as many preserves around New Zealand as my wife and I are able.

Music, collecting it (thousands of CDs of dark folk, dark ambient, noise, weird rock, jazz) and I am a reviewer of dark ambient & folk for a magazine) and practising the guitar, and recording one's own music in my studio.

Cooking, I absolutely love experimenting with new foods, New Zealand has only really opened up to the vast foodstuffs the world has had access to in the last 5-8 years. Up until then it was very 'meat + 3 vege'.

Lastly I collect canes, preferably the older the better.
Morrison, eh? Twisted.
I love bizzare and rare music, although the prices are a downer.....

The New Nonsense
09-13-2005, 08:43 PM
It's wonderful hearing everyone's various interests. Like many of you I have many hobbies (when I'm not curled up in a dim attic corner devouring a Ligottian tome with my eyes). One of my main hobbies (I call it a hobby because one can't really make honest money from it) is investigating the paranormal. I've been part of a team of paranormal investigators for some time now (way before the Ghost Hunters show on the Sci-Fi channel). Mostly we do cases of alleged hauntings, but we also investigate things like crop circles, cryptozoological sightings, and psychical claims. Two weeks ago my team was filmed conducting an investigation for a show called "World's Scariest Places". It will air on Oct 22nd on the ABC Family channel.
Some of my other hobbies inlcude growing carnivorous jungle plants and rare orchids, painting & wood carving, collecting rare books, and home brewing. I also opperate a private tiki bar (The Headhunter's Hideaway) which I would classify as a hobby (it includes collecting fine rums). In short, I'm always chasing "spirits" in one form or another. :)

The Silent One
09-13-2005, 09:04 PM
...One of my main hobbies (I call it a hobby because one can't really make honest money from it) is investigating the paranormal. I've been part of a team of paranormal investigators for some time now (way before the Ghost Hunters show on the Sci-Fi channel). Mostly we do cases of alleged hauntings, but we also investigate things like crop circles, cryptozoological sightings, and psychical claims. Two weeks ago my team was filmed conducting an investigation for a show called "World's Scariest Places". It will air on Oct 22nd on the ABC Family channel...
Oh, where, spirit hunter ;)?

The New Nonsense
09-13-2005, 11:52 PM
Oh, where, spirit hunter ;)?
We performed an investigation at an infamous place in Wisconsin called St. Nazianz Seminary. People have reported paranormal phenomena there since it was built in the 1850's. It's large place consisting of 5 massive buildings, graveyard, and underground tunnels. I've never seen a place that looked more like a horror movie set than this place. It was founded by Father Ambrose Oschwald who led a strange sect called "The Spiritual-Magnetic Association". It was a very strict and secretive group; a sort of dooms day cult of it's time. The legends associated with the place are too long to list here. It was abandoned in 1980, but the curse seems to linger on. In 2000 a bunch of vandal kids were screwing around on the grounds of the seminary. One of the kids threw a rope around a flag pole and tried to pull it down. The pole snapped and ended up impaling the kid through the neck killing him. I can PM a more detailed history of the place if anyone is interested. Pretty fascinating stuff.

symbolique
09-14-2005, 12:05 AM
the silent one: aye, rare disturbing music is ridiculously overpriced, but it is such a select market.

eldritchoo: Having studied Ancient & Modern Religions at University I quickly became disillusioned with the level of 'guessing' and 'assumption' by professors and other internation academics and by chance late in my second year I stumbled across the Tehuti Research Foundation (http://www.egypt-tehuti.org/).

Basically the TRF exists to further to study of Egypt from the eyes of those who still breathe and practise the old religion, in a sense (some hide this under a veil of Sufism, while farther from the main centres Islam can have less a stranglehold on religious thought). Moustafa Gadalla, the Egyptologist I struck up a friendship with some ten years ago, is an indigenous Egyptian (not an Arab), a Baladi. He comes from a background of an engineer though he now lives in America, has written some 11 books on the study of many facets of Egyptian life past and present that many white Abrahamic Egyptologists silently scorn because he doesn't approach his culture based on beliefs of furthering his own career and income by positing derogatory investigation. His books are factual, he makes no assumptions, guesses, or claims, but merely presents evidence, much like a lawyer and using common sense to wade through the muck that Academic Islam, Christianity and Judaism has stuck and continues to stick to Ancient Egypt. Those against him offer no defence nor comment on his work, hoping that silence will quell his spirit. I helped him with books on the study of Egyptian music (credited within) and I'm traveling with him to Egypt in April next year. He's no prophet, messiah, or quack, he's a native illuminating his heritage without bias and in that his books are unique. I for my part do my extra bit kidnapping those I see fit, entombing them practising dilligently upon their bodies with the necessary surgical tools until they see the truth.

As for my canes, my wife recently departed on a government convention till next week with my camera this morning, but late last night I took a photo of the first cane I ever saw - to show Barry - and now gratefully own, inherited through my grandfather. I've attached it below. Price wise they can vary horribly and surprisingly cheap, it all depends on whether the seller knows their true worth.

http://www.symbolique.net/p9131388.jpg

eldritch00
09-18-2005, 10:14 AM
symbolique: That's a fine-looking cane! And thanks too for the info about your Egyptological work. I've forwarded that bit to my girlfriend, who I'm sure will find it fascinating.

The New Nonsense: Do send me a PM detailing more about that haunting you've been looking into!

unknown
09-18-2005, 01:45 PM
symbolique, that is a fine cane, indeed. I've been looking into obtaining a dagger cane, but, alas, they are illegal in the state of california. I'm thinking of just having it shipped to my dad, and then he can ship it out to me.

The Silent One
09-18-2005, 05:50 PM
http://www.symbolique.net/p9131388.jpg
Yo :).

Dr. Bantham
10-22-2005, 04:27 PM
Two weeks ago my team was filmed conducting an investigation for a show called "World's Scariest Places". It will air on Oct 22nd on the ABC Family channel.I am hoping to view this episode, but the channel is running a marathon for this show throughout the day and night, and I can not determine which one is referenced here. Does anyone know?

The Silent One
10-23-2005, 12:21 AM
The New Nonsense: Do send me a PM detailing more about that haunting you've been looking into!
Ditto, man! Sounds like my kind of ghoulish fun. Hopefully with real ghouls :wink:.

The New Nonsense
10-23-2005, 05:02 AM
I just heard from the production people that the show is supposed to air on Oct 23rd at 8pm (not sure which time zone). The episode is going to be called "Urban Legends". I also found out that the segment that I'm involved with is pretty short. Only 7 minutes! With that kind of editing, I hope my part didn't get cut out.