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When_MP_Attacks
02-02-2011, 10:08 PM
?

Montag
02-02-2011, 11:37 PM
Brian Masters Killing for Company. British serial killer. See the thread titled Lovecraft and Eddy Got It Right

darknessdoubled
02-03-2011, 01:10 AM
Emmanuel Carrere's The Adversary is quite good.

G. S. Carnivals
02-03-2011, 02:02 AM
Why not a classic "nonfiction novel"? In Cold Blood by Truman Capote. :eek:

bendk
02-03-2011, 04:30 AM
Mind Hunter by John Douglas. (If anyone could catch John Doe it would be John Douglas)

damo
02-03-2011, 08:26 AM
midnight in the garden of good and evil by John Berendt. great book, great film (directed by the ever-brilliant clint eastwood).

waffles
02-03-2011, 10:49 AM
Two Favorites:

Amazon.com: The Family (9781560253969): Ed Sanders: Books

and

Amazon.com: The Stranger Beside Me (9781416559597): Ann Rule: Books

I second In Cold Blood too.

MorganScorpion
02-03-2011, 11:58 AM
Killing For Company. Brian Masters. Disappears up it's own arse in the second part; at it's best when he quotes Mr Nilsen.

Seconded Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil.

Lichen
02-04-2011, 05:14 PM
Monsters of Weimar is a fine omnibus edition collecting Theodor Lessings book (1925) on Fritz Haarmann and two books about Peter Kurten, The Sadist (1945) by Karl Berg & Study in Sadism (1938) by George Godwin. Well worth reading.

Richard Louirie's Hunting the Devil (1993) (Andrei Chikatilo murders) has almost fiction narrative but I liked it a lot.

When_MP_Attacks
02-06-2011, 03:15 PM
Thanks for the tips.

I recently read a riveting one called Wicked Intentions. What makes it so compelling are the transcriptions of phone calls and various conversations involving the villainess Sheila LaBarre. Her knack for manipulation and bullying are not soon forgotten...

actualwolf
02-07-2011, 02:22 PM
_Columbine_ by Dave Cullen.

A thoroughly researched, unexpectedly moving account in its own right that attempts to go deep into the minds of the killers.

Readers of TLO might find this description of dreams by Eric Harris, disturbingly compelling:

"Eric was always a dreamer, but he liked them ugly: bleak and morose, yet boring as hell. Eric dreamed of a world where nothing ever happened . . . In one, he was suspended inside a small dank room, like the interior hull of a ship. Futuristic yet decaying old computer screens lined the walls, covered with dust and mold and vines. The moon provided the only light, trickling in through the portals, shadows creeping all around. A sea rose and fell monotonously. Nothing happened. Eric was overjoyed."

Reads like it came straight from "The Bungalow House."