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Speaking Mute
10-09-2013, 09:10 PM
I'm curious if anyone here has read "In the Dust of this Planet: The Horror of Philosphy Vol. 1" by Thacker. He forwards an interesting premise in the opening section; the Horror genre - particularly in the vein of Lovecraft and Ligotti's fiction - grants us a window on the Kantian "thing-in-itself" through stripping away human values and interests. Thacker contrasts the "world-without-us" perspective found in Horror to both traditional mythological/religious views of the world and modern scientific/humanist views that take the world's being as "being-for-us". Unfortunately, Thacker doesn't pursue this line of thought very far - but this book is only one of three projected volumes. I'm keen on where he might take the idea, and what others think.

Thacker is part of a small band of philosophers publishing through Zer0 books who take up similar themes. I'm currently half way through Graham Harman's "Weird Realism; Lovecraft and Philosophy". This book merits a thread of its own, but it compliments Thacker's book quite well so far.

gveranon
10-09-2013, 11:49 PM
Thacker is part of a small band of philosophers publishing through Zer0 books who take up similar themes. I'm currently half way through Graham Harman's "Weird Realism; Lovecraft and Philosophy". This book merits a thread of its own, but it compliments Thacker's book quite well so far.

I wrote a little bit about Weird Realism here (http://www.ligotti.net/showpost.php?p=84493&postcount=17). There is also an old thread called Weird Realism, which I won't bother linking to. It was just a long flamewar that wasn't really about the book or Harman's philosophy (ah, the internet!).

matt cardin
10-10-2013, 08:31 AM
I read Eugene's In the Dust of this Planet: The Horror of Philosophy Vol. 1 a couple of years ago and found it to be pretty damned brilliant, although he briefly lost me in an early portion with his musical excursion into some black metal theorizing. (Not that there's anything wrong with black metal theorizing, but I just wasn't familiar with the particular items he was examining, and so the personal thread of identification that guided me through the rest of the book wasn't there.) I consider the book to be a real contribution to its subject, which you articulate nicely, Speaking Mute, and which is obviously of high interest to the TLO crowd.

N.B., Erik Davis interviewed Eugene about this book (http://archive.is/c8VVY) and his work in general on the Expanding Mind radio show last year. The conversation makes for an excellent and fascinating introduction, as indicated by the program's description: "Lovecraft, medieval mysticism, and thinking the world-without-us. A talk with Professor Eugene Thacker, author of In the Dust of the Earth: the Horror of Philosophy and After Life."

Speaking Mute
10-10-2013, 07:44 PM
I wrote a little bit about Weird Realism here (http://www.ligotti.net/showpost.php?p=84493&postcount=17). There is also an old thread called Weird Realism, which I won't bother linking to. It was just a long flamewar that wasn't really about the book or Harman's philosophy (ah, the internet!).

...I'm about halfway through Weird Realism - and so far I think it's a brilliant analysis of Lovecraft's prose. I agree that Graham elevates Lovecraft a bit too high, but I can forgive him given the shoddy assessment Lovecraft has received from literary critics. I've always loved Lovecraft's prose, but never bothered to sort out what exactly it was in his choice of words that I found so captivating. Graham's actually given me a deeper appreciation for Lovecraft's approach to writing, and seen things that I hadn't seen before (Lovecraft's humor, for instance).

I do, however, part ways with Graham so far as the uniqueness of Lovecraft's style. One of my first impressions from Graham's analysis is the similarity between H.P. Lovecraft's and Joseph Conrad's use of allusive description. I've enjoyed both authors for quite some time, but never thought them akin to one another so far as prose.

So far as the third section, I cannot say much as I've yet to read it. I do, however, recommend Graham's The Quadruple Object if you're inclined towards metaphysics. Grahams quite a philosophical mutant; his views on objects remind me of Leibniz's monads, but he reaches this point through using Heidegger's tool analysis and an some epistemic considerations more common to the Analytic Philosophy of Science.

I think Graham's view of objects might lend more formal arguments to Thacker's - they're parallel thematically, but Thacker's writing in In the Dust of this Planet verges on stream of consciousness...but I'll say more about this in my replay to Matt Cardin...

Speaking Mute
10-10-2013, 08:56 PM
I read Eugene's In the Dust of this Planet: The Horror of Philosophy Vol. 1 a couple of years ago and found it to be pretty damned brilliant, although he briefly lost me in an early portion with his musical excursion into some black metal theorizing. (Not that there's anything wrong with black metal theorizing, but I just wasn't familiar with the particular items he was examining, and so the personal thread of identification that guided me through the rest of the book wasn't there.) I consider the book to be a real contribution to its subject, which you articulate nicely, Speaking Mute, and which is obviously of high interest to the TLO crowd.

I felt let down by the later half of In the Dust of this Planet - he raised such fascinating ideas about death and extinction, and then wandered off into more mundane topics. I've nothing against Black Metal, and understand how it could have related to the open section - but he never really tied this up. I enjoyed his review of the occult detective trope in Horror films and literature - but this was an even greater digression. I'm hoping the next volume is more focused on the "world wtihout us" - I fear he might not have pursued the topic further is because he doesn't know how to take it beyond suggetion.

...in any case, the first section made me consider just how anthroprocentric Naturalism tends to be even at its extremities. Eliminativism, for instance, has often been forwarded as a mental salve that will allow us to be "at home in the universe" if we only embrace it - and parallels to Zen Buddhism have been repeatedly marked. The "world without us" strikes me as much more extreme, and much more truthful due to it's brutality...

"I have seen the dark universe yawning
Where the black planets roll without aim-
Where they roll in their horror unheeded,
Without knowledge or luster or name."

...but can the concept due to metaphysical work, as it were? The trouble with Cosmic Horror is that it tends to make the "world-without-us" into an undifferentiated void. We might not be able to allude to "unobserved entity" without using negation - but surely the "world-without-us" is richer than we can imagine?

curatorialentity
10-11-2013, 12:25 PM
After Life was a much better book.

Speaking Mute
10-12-2013, 07:34 AM
After Life was a much better book.

Does he take up any of the themes in In the Dust of this Planet? After Life looks like it focuses on defining what constitutes a living organism...

Alarm Agent
10-14-2013, 02:11 PM
Here's Thacker on Schopenhauer (http://www.metamute.org/editorial/occultural-studies-column/philosophical-doomcore) , Blackness (http://www.metamute.org/editorial/occultural-studies-column/black-black) or on And Also The Trees (http://www.metamute.org/editorial/occultural-studies-column/melody-and-melancholy). I quite like his texts and there are not many Philosophers who explore the dark side. At least he is less obscure than Meillassoux and doesn't expect you to know the whole history of Neuroscience and phenomenology like Ray Brassier does in Nihil Unbound.
Edit : on Mr. Ligotti (http://www.metamute.org/editorial/occultural-studies-column/we-are-not-here)

Nolon
10-20-2013, 01:03 PM
In Speculations vol. 4 Dylan Trigg writes interestingly about the horror of darkness, here is the link:
http://www.speculations-journal.org/storage/Trigg_The%20Horror%20of%20Darkness_Speculations_IV .pdf

I would also like to second Speaking Mute's recommendation of The Quadruple Object. The book contains many interesting reflections on the world without us and the subterranean strangeness of things:

"The cosmos seems to be gigantic in both space and time. It is more ancient than all our ape-like ancestors and all other life forms. It might also seem safe to assume that the trillions of entities in the cosmos engage in relations and duels even when no humans observe them. However interesting we humans may be to ourselves, we are apparently in no way central to the cosmic drama, marooned as we are on an average-sized planet near a mediocre sun, and confined to a tiny portion of the history of the universe."

Funny btw that Graham's concept "Ontography" is explicitly referred to M.R. James' story Oh Whistle and I'll Come to You My Lad :-)

curatorialentity
10-20-2013, 02:45 PM
After Life was a much better book.

Does he take up any of the themes in In the Dust of this Planet? After Life looks like it focuses on defining what constitutes a living organism...

Yes, he does. After Life addresses a slightly broader topic, but in more detail and with more sophistication.

Speaking Mute
10-20-2013, 06:09 PM
Here's Thacker on Schopenhauer (http://www.metamute.org/editorial/occultural-studies-column/philosophical-doomcore) , Blackness (http://www.metamute.org/editorial/occultural-studies-column/black-black) or on And Also The Trees (http://www.metamute.org/editorial/occultural-studies-column/melody-and-melancholy). I quite like his texts and there are not many Philosophers who explore the dark side. At least he is less obscure than Meillassoux and doesn't expect you to know the whole history of Neuroscience and phenomenology like Ray Brassier does in Nihil Unbound.
Edit : on Mr. Ligotti (http://www.metamute.org/editorial/occultural-studies-column/we-are-not-here)

Black on Black was a great article. From what I've read by Thacker so far, I think I enjoy his cultural criticism and history better than his philosophical work. He knows how to make an interesting potpourri if nothing else. I did, however, just order After Life...

Speaking Mute
10-20-2013, 06:39 PM
In Speculations vol. 4 Dylan Trigg writes interestingly about the horror of darkness, here is the link:
http://www.speculations-journal.org/storage/Trigg_The%20Horror%20of%20Darkness_Speculations_IV .pdf

Great article - this is more of what I hoping to find in In the Dust of this Planet. Trigg has written a full volume on the subject which I'm ordering along with Thacker's After Life...

The Memory of Place: A Phenomenology of the Uncanny (Series In Continental Thought): Dylan Trigg: 9780821420393: Amazon.com: Books

I'm glad to see some academic respect extended to these views. I graduated with a BA in philosophy in 2011 and decided not to go on to a graduate program due to feeling alienated from the field. Any mention of Schopenhauer would get steered into a debate on his misogyny and racism, Anti-anthropocentric environmentalism and Anti-natalism was dismissed as excesses from the 1970's New Left, and I never would have mentioned Lovecraft in a philosophical context for fear of immediate dismissal. Hopefully this movement continues to grow.

curatorialentity
10-23-2013, 03:34 AM
In Speculations vol. 4 Dylan Trigg writes interestingly about the horror of darkness, here is the link:
http://www.speculations-journal.org/storage/Trigg_The%20Horror%20of%20Darkness_Speculations_IV .pdf

Great article - this is more of what I hoping to find in In the Dust of this Planet. Trigg has written a full volume on the subject which I'm ordering along with Thacker's After Life...

The Memory of Place: A Phenomenology of the Uncanny (Series In Continental Thought): Dylan Trigg: 9780821420393: Amazon.com: Books

I'm glad to see some academic respect extended to these views. I graduated with a BA in philosophy in 2011 and decided not to go on to a graduate program due to feeling alienated from the field. Any mention of Schopenhauer would get steered into a debate on his misogyny and racism, Anti-anthropocentric environmentalism and Anti-natalism was dismissed as excesses from the 1970's New Left, and I never would have mentioned Lovecraft in a philosophical context for fear of immediate dismissal. Hopefully this movement continues to grow.

We're out there, but you'll find that most of us aren't in philosophy departments (at least in the U.S.).

Alarm Agent
10-23-2013, 03:11 PM
I'm glad to see some academic respect extended to these views. I graduated with a BA in philosophy in 2011 and decided not to go on to a graduate program due to feeling alienated from the field. Any mention of Schopenhauer would get steered into a debate on his misogyny and racism, Anti-anthropocentric environmentalism and Anti-natalism was dismissed as excesses from the 1970's New Left, and I never would have mentioned Lovecraft in a philosophical context for fear of immediate dismissal. Hopefully this movement continues to grow.
Such things happen when flat-brained ideologies like 'Political Correctness' contaminate Philosophy. But that's nothing new. Schopenhauer himself condemned his contemporary scholars for being mostly interested in advancing various political agendas for their own benefit. That's why one has at least to respect the efforts of Harman or Brassier to destroy Anthropocentricism (still so ridiculously prevalent in Philosophy as opposed to in Cosmology). Another extreme example might be Nick Land The Thirst for Annihilation: Georges Bataille and Virulent Nihilism: Nick Land: 9780415056083: Amazon.com: Books
But since turning over to the 'Dark Side' of Dark Enlightenment or Neo-Reactionism (http://darkecologies.com/category/neoreactionism/) he has become a Pariah or Heretic of first order.

Speaking Mute
10-27-2013, 03:51 PM
After finishing Harman's Weird Realism and starting a second reading of The Quadruple Object, I've concluded that both books should be read together. If I'd read Weird Realism without prior exposure to Harman's ideas, I'd have found the third section lacking and undeveloped - much the same as Thacker. Weird Realism also serves to illustrate the novelty of Harman's theory of objects, as to my first reading of The Quadruple Object lead me to draw too close a parallel between Harman and Leibniz.

Harman has a new book on Speculative Realism coming out in a few weeks:

Bells and Whistles: More Speculative Realism: Graham Harman: 9781782790389: Amazon.com: Books


I wonder if Zero Books has a strict page constraint, as to every book I've ordered so far has been rather slender. In any case, I find it amusing that the Speculative Realists are not only taking inspiration from horror fiction, but being published like horror fiction as well - small specialty presses.

Such things happen when flat-brained ideologies like 'Political Correctness' contaminate Philosophy. But that's nothing new. Schopenhauer himself condemned his contemporary scholars for being mostly interested in advancing various political agendas for their own benefit. That's why one has at least to respect the efforts of Harman or Brassier to destroy Anthropocentricism (still so ridiculously prevalent in Philosophy as opposed to in Cosmology). Another extreme example might be Nick Land The Thirst for Annihilation: Georges Bataille and Virulent Nihilism: Nick Land: 9780415056083: Amazon.com: Books (http://www.amazon.com/The-Thirst-Annihilation-Bataille-Virulent/dp/041505608X)
But since turning over to the 'Dark Side' of Dark Enlightenment or Neo-Reactionism (http://darkecologies.com/category/neoreactionism/) he has become a Pariah or Heretic of first order.

I think there's two reasons for the stodginess. The first is that Anglo-American philosophy now has a century long tradition of telling itself that philosophy is useless and irrelevant. The second is that Philosophy Departments are facing existential threats as Liberal Arts programs are winnowed away by funding cuts. None of these are a good foundation for saying anything radical or different. But it's a self-perpetuating downward spiral, as to redoubles cliquish behavior and narrow mindsets that make Philosophy departments irrelevant little ivory towers. So on it goes down hill.

gveranon
10-27-2013, 09:04 PM
After finishing Harman's Weird Realism and starting a second reading of The Quadruple Object, I've concluded that both books should be read together. If I'd read Weird Realism without prior exposure to Harman's ideas, I'd have found the third section lacking and undeveloped - much the same as Thacker. Weird Realism also serves to illustrate the novelty of Harman's theory of objects, as to my first reading of The Quadruple Object lead me to draw too close a parallel between Harman and Leibniz.

Circus Philosophicus is also a good, short introduction to Harman's philosophy. It's full of colorful examples, and lighter on purely theoretical discussion than The Quadruple Object. I agree that it helps to read more Harman in order to better understand what he means by "weird realism" -- and that Weird Realism will help one to better understand his object-oriented metaphysics, too.

MTC
04-28-2014, 05:25 AM
Has anyone read Eugene Thacker's An Ideal for Living yet? It looks pretty interesting and far out...

http://www.amazon.com/Ideal-For-Living-Eugene-Thacker/dp/1497358256/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1398673171&sr=8-3&keywords=eugene+thacker

luciferfell
04-28-2014, 07:21 PM
My favorite works in this vein would be Ben Woodard's books Slime Dynamics and On an Ungrounded Earth. They are a very dark look at philosophy through the lens of weird horror and pessimistic thought. Sections on virus's, worms, black suns, and the heat death of the universe. Must reads.

Alarm Agent
04-30-2014, 11:36 AM
Actually i'm still waiting for the follow-ups of "In the Dust of this Planet" : 'Starry Speculative Corpse' and 'Tentacles longer than Night' pursuing the relationship between Thought, Horror and Philosophy. I especially liked the idea of a world not just indifferent to us, but actually A World against us which exposes the World for us as nothing but a delusional lie made up to ward off the horrors of existance. Of course, this line of thinking is nothing but a negative theology, but it still seems more plausible than to live in a world of carnage and still hold up the believe of a benevolent god.
@luciferfell :The most amazing thing i read was in 'The Five Ages of the Universe' [Adams&Laughlin] : the possiblity of spontanous annihilation of the whole Universe through a process called 'Vacuum decay' : a phase transition which travels at nearly lightspeed and destroys every atom in it's wake. Theoretically, it could have started already somewhere beyond the observable universe.

luciferfell
04-30-2014, 07:22 PM
I too am waiting and wondering about the follow ups to Thackers book. The titles are delicious!

MTC
05-04-2014, 12:21 PM
While we wait and wonder, Dylan Trigg's The Thing (due out in August this year) speculates on horror from a phenomenological tradition. I really like the book's dusty cover.
http://www.zero-books.net/books/thing

luciferfell
05-04-2014, 03:42 PM
While we wait and wonder, Dylan Trigg's The Thing (due out in August this year) speculates on horror from a phenomenological tradition. I really like the book's dusty cover.
http://www.zero-books.net/books/thing

That looks amazing. Im quite enjoying the recent joining of philosophy and weird horror.

Alarm Agent
05-05-2014, 04:19 PM
Here is another essay about Schopenhauer and Kant by Thacker: DARKLIFE: NEGATION, NOTHINGNESS, AND THE
WILL-TO-LIFE IN SCHOPENHAUER (http://parrhesiajournal.org/parrhesia12/parrhesia12_thacker.pdf) (PDF)
He shows how Schopenhauer turned Kants philosophy (" the most elaborate fit of panic in the history of the Earth" -Nick Land), to save God from rationality and putting him beyond human reach into the ghost world of Noumena, into a dark and blind impulse that ultimately cannibalizes itself - the blind will to live.

…he will be least afraid of becoming nothing in death who has
recognized that he is already nothing now…
Schopenhauer

Speaking Mute
05-12-2014, 05:25 PM
Many thanks for the heads up on Trigg's latest release - I see Trigg as carrying out the program that Thacker has only vaguely outlined...

MTC
05-18-2014, 05:41 AM
RE the intersection between horror fiction and philosophy I came across this well-informed article on Slavoj Zizek as a gothic writer (!) by Benjamin Noys.
http://zizekstudies.org/index.php/ijzs/article/viewFile/274/372

MTC
05-20-2014, 01:14 PM
Has anyone read Quentin Meillassoux? I'd be interested to know what you think about his works. Personally I don't know much about him but I have encountered his name so often now that I think he deserves a closer look.

I guess I am primarily interested in After Finitude - although I also noticed that he recently wrote a book about Isaac Asimov's SF short story "The Billiard Ball". Unfortunately it's in french! But my guess is someone will soon translate it. Anywhere here is the link:

http://www.auxforgesdevulcain.fr/collections/essais/metaphysique-et-fiction-des-mondes-hors-science/

MTC
05-20-2014, 01:29 PM
Oh while I am at it, here is a pdf link to Collapse Vol IV Concept Horror including a lot of interesting texts by Thacker, Houellebecq, Ligotti(!), Noys, Harman etc.

https://archive.org/details/CollapseVol.IvConceptHorror

Edit: Updated link

Alarm Agent
05-26-2014, 11:11 AM
Has anyone read Quentin Meillassoux? I'd be interested to know what you think about his works. Personally I don't know much about him but I have encountered his name so often now that I think he deserves a closer look.

Don't know so much about Meillassoux myself. This interview (http://quod.lib.umich.edu/o/ohp/11515701.0001.001/1:4.4/--new-materialism-interviews-cartographies?rgn=div2;view=fulltext)is quite interesting though. Honestly , simple minded as i am i strongly gravitate towards eliminativism a la Brassier or Metzinger and i find all this speculation about the metaphysics of thought ultimately futile. This thing in your head generates what we call 'reality' and the illusion of 'self' and how close it will ever come to 'objective' reality (if there even is such a thing) we will probably never know.

MTC
07-17-2014, 01:03 PM
Just finished reading Meillassoux' recent book on science fiction and what he terms extro-science fiction or XSF. The book was ok but not very exciting. His discussion of XSF-worlds (Ubik by Philip K. Dick, and works by some french authors) seemed to me a bit superficial. Maybe I just wish he had focused on horror fiction instead.

Possibly more interesting is this book by Dylan Trigg recently published by 3AM Press:

http://www.galleybeggar.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/BodyPartsCoverJulyCS1_2-500x706.jpg

BODY PARTS compiles Dylan Trigg's thinking on subjects as diverse as haunting, agoraphobia, horror, animals, death, and the uncanniness of the human body. At the heart of the book is a phenomenological exploration of the relation between absence and anonymity.

MTC
07-17-2014, 03:03 PM
Ben Woodard's new book, On an Ungrounded Earth, "...constructs an eclectic variant of geophilosophy through engagements with digging machines, cyclones and volcanoes, secret vessels, nuclear waste, giant worms, decay, hell, demon souls, subterranean cities, black suns, and xenoarcheaology, via continental theory (Nietzsche, Schelling, Deleuze, et alia) and various cultural objects such as horror films, videogames, and weird Lovecraftian fictions."

Here is the amazon link:

http://www.amazon.com/On-Ungrounded-Earth-Towards-Geophilosophy/dp/0615785387/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1405619188&sr=8-1&keywords=Ben+Woodard

The book is Open Access, a pdf version can be downloaded here (http://monoskop.org/images/9/90/Woodward_Ben_On_an_Ungrounded_Earth_Towards_a_New_ Geophilosophy.pdf)

Alarm Agent
07-30-2014, 05:00 PM
Ben Woodard's new book, On an Ungrounded Earth, "...constructs an eclectic variant of geophilosophy through engagements with digging machines, cyclones and volcanoes, secret vessels, nuclear waste, giant worms, decay, hell, demon souls, subterranean cities, black suns, and xenoarcheaology, via continental theory (Nietzsche, Schelling, Deleuze, et alia) and various cultural objects such as horror films, videogames, and weird Lovecraftian fictions."

Yeah, i downloaded this pdf ages ago. It belongs somehow into a line of thought with Negarestani's Cyclonopedia Interesting about Cyclonopedia was how Negarestani blended Cthulhuism's ancient Evils with the modern Pandemonium of Oil, Terror and Islam into a Geotrauma in the desert. The desert of the real becomes a living nightmare in which we all live. It somehow comes full circle when we remember that Lovecraft's inspiration were the ancient arabic tales of the Djinn desert demons. They are resurrected now as a nomadic Deleuzian Warmachine. "The nomad moves, but while seated, and he is only seated while moving. He knows how to wait with infinite patience. He is a vector of deterritorialization."

SpookyDread
08-10-2014, 05:35 PM
I think my favourite essay from Hideous Gnosis had to do with the idea of body armouring in preparation for supernatural conflict which reinforces the notion of the dissolution of the ego. The wearing of battle armour in black metal music has to do with the imminent collapse of the structure separating yourself from the world around you.

Horror is necessarily sentient . I'm almost through reading In The Dust of this Planet, I found him really on track when he was talking about From Beyond, and the spiral, or Dante's Inferno … Imagining the world outside of us but in communication with us. The world without us is a fun concept, but without the notion consciousness, isn't compelling. The book is fun when its engaging with consciousness. If anyone was interested in that idea , to do with ego collapse and daemonic-dread , I made a thread in the world events forum about the idea of living demonically possessed, or psychotic. That's eventually what daemonic-dread leads to, and the horror of fiction like Lovecraft's and cosmic fear has to do with the confrontation of the limit of your ability to understand yourself and the intimation of alien consciousness.

MTC
12-25-2014, 06:04 PM
At the end of In the Dust of this Planet Eugene Thacker quotes from a book by Henry Annesley, Dark Geomancy: Mysticism and Politics in the Age of the Old Ones (Boston: Miskatonic University Press, 2009). I did a search for the book because of its great title but wasn't able to find anything except that a character by that name apparently figured in a draft for one of Lovecraft's stories. I then realized that Miskatonic University Press also sounded suspiciously fictive (yeah I am probably a bit slow). Anyway here is the passage, p. 155. Nice way of underpinning a theory of mysticism in the non-mystical!

"But, whether one opts for light or dark mysticism, the question that modern scholars such as Underhill return to is this, summarized in Henry Annesley's Dark Geomancy: 'unless the history of the mystics can touch and light up some part of this normal experience, take its place in the general history of the non-human, contribute something towards our understanding of non-human nature and destiny, its interest for us can never be more than remote, academic, and unreal.' In short, what does mysticism mean to us, in the 'ordinary non-mystical'? Underhill's response - a response that has continued to be echoed down to the present day - is that the history of mysticism 'is vital for the deeper understanding of the history of humanity'."

Speaking Mute
02-12-2015, 12:52 AM
Thacker's second and third books in the "The Horror of Philosophy" trilogy are now both listed on Amazon and slated for release in April:

Starry Speculative Corpse: Horror of Philosophy (Vol 2): Eugene Thacker: 9781782798910: Amazon.com: Books

Tentacles Longer Than Night: Horror of Philosophy (Vol 3): Eugene Thacker: 9781782798897: Amazon.com: Books

I'm also currently reading David Peak's "The Spectacle of the Void" based on a recommendation here (albiet, I cannot remember the poster off hand, my apologies) - which so far shares quite a bit of territory with Dylan Trigg's "The Thing".

luciferfell
02-12-2015, 04:37 AM
Those new Thacker books look amazing! At this point I thought he was kind of joking about having a books 2 and 3. I viewed some portions of them with the amazon look inside feature.. and wow. Must buys..

Speaking Mute
02-12-2015, 07:22 PM
Those new Thacker books look amazing! At this point I thought he was kind of joking about having a books 2 and 3. I viewed some portions of them with the amazon look inside feature.. and wow. Must buys..

Given Thacker's ubiquity and subsequent publications, I was wondering if the project would be completed myself. Judging from the contents, the second volume appears much more focused as well.

Evans
02-14-2015, 07:37 AM
Honestly , simple minded as i am i strongly gravitate towards eliminativism a la Brassier or Metzinger and i find all this speculation about the metaphysics of thought ultimately futile. This thing in your head generates what we call 'reality' and the illusion of 'self' and how close it will ever come to 'objective' reality (if there even is such a thing) we will probably never know.

This is either an instance of infelicitous phraseology on the poster's part or quite possibly the wittiest and most subversive thing anyone has ever said on these boards.

MTC
02-21-2015, 12:06 PM
Another recent horror philosophy book is Fabián Ludueña, H.P. Lovecraft: The Disjunction in Being (Schism, 2015). The book seems critically independent and well researched. Looking forward to read it.

https://schismmsihcs.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/new-image.jpg?w=1200&h=936

Speaking Mute
02-21-2015, 06:34 PM
Another recent horror philosophy book is Fabián Ludueña, H.P. Lovecraft: The Disjunction in Being (Schism, 2015). The book seems critically independent and well researched. Looking forward to read it.


This appears to be already out of print - the publication date on Amazon is listed as Jan. 15th. The Schism Press website was short on details. I'm curious if you know if this is still slated for publication and Amazon is simply mistaken, or if you acquired this book through another merchant?

MTC
02-22-2015, 04:35 AM
Actually I'm not sure the english translation has been published yet? At least I hope not! if anyone knows otherwise please tell. The Spanish original should still be out there. A Portuguese (I think?) translation was also recently published. http://culturaebarbarie.org/?page_id=453

paeng
04-27-2017, 09:56 AM
Twin Peaks and the Dust of This Planet - YouTube

Alarm Agent
05-01-2017, 03:10 PM
I think Thacker touched upon this at the end of 'After Life' when he talked about W.H. Hodgson’s Night Land where the landscape of the dying universe seems to alive but not in any shape that makes sense to humans.
Greg Bear wrote something of a sequel or homage in City at the End of Time.
I think it wasn't that well received but I liked it, especially the idea with the books that contain every possible combination of signs, that is every text not only once written but all possible texts, novels that could be written, that would dwarf even Borges Library of Babel.