THE NIGHTMARE NETWORK
Go Back   THE NIGHTMARE NETWORK > Discussion & Interpretation > The Repository > Member Interviews
Home Forums Content Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Contagion Members Media Diversion Info Register
Comment
 
Article Tools Search this Article Display Modes Translate
TLO Member Interview: Nemonymous (2)
TLO Member Interview: Nemonymous (2)
Interview conducted by Phillip Stecco
Published by G. S. Carnivals
11-25-2009
Topic Nominated TLO Member Interview: Nemonymous (2)

TLO Member Interview: Nemonymous (2)
Conducted by Phillip Stecco

D. F. Lewis is the author of the story collections Weirdmonger and Only Connect (written in collaboration with his father Gordon Lewis). Since 2001, he has edited the...
__________________
"What does it mean to be alive except to court disaster and suffering at every moment?"

Tibet: Carnivals?
Ligotti: Ceremonies for initiating children into the cult of the sinister.
Tibet: Gas stations?
Ligotti: Nothing to say about gas stations as such, although I've always responded to the smell of gasoline as if it were a kind of perfume.
20 Thanks From:
  #20  
By gveranon on 12-04-2009
Re: TLO Member Interview: Nemonymous (2)

The Poshlost Balcony by D. F. Lewis and Vladimir Nabokov

(I'm breaking the rules for a Quirk Classic here because, as far as I know, Nabokov never used the word poshlost in a title. Still, it's a very Nabokovian word.)
Reply With Quote
  #21  
By Nemonymous on 12-05-2009
Re: TLO Member Interview: Nemonymous (2)

Quote Originally Posted by gveranon View Post
The Poshlost Balcony by D. F. Lewis....

There is something indefinable about human nature as we head into the second decade of the 21st century. A spiritual angst that bridges slackness and stoicism, gloom and glitter, concupiscent closeness and the cold conquering of a personal Everest...

Until the final ever-rest.

George sadly found all his lost balconies, when he wasn’t looking for them any longer. Stacked in rusted or shattered art-installations of baluster, unsupported-floor, railing and hand-rest. An unsuccessful landfill close to the outskirts of his home town. Guarded by unconcealing fences.

As he peered through to view the site more clearly, even the metal and wooden window-shutters and doors that once led to and from some of the original in-situ balconies formed tributaries of architectural appendage snapped off and dumped here, even if they weren’t strictly appendages at all when in-situ themselves.

Only balconies are vestigial. And, possibly, chimneys.

But only humanity is truly detached.

One balcony he could reach to touch via some broken slats of the fence. The balcony was still mostly intact ... armour-plated amid articulations of designer Gothic. Now complex with weathered claw-traps and stylised thorn-crowns, this balcony once belonged to a large house on the rich side of town. George recognised it from when he had once passed under it upon visiting someone inside that very house. A prospective employer?. An old school friend recently re-discovered on Facebook? An illicit lover? A vengeance sought? A dream re-enacted? Many of these things went through George’s mind but he couldn’t remember the true reason for his visit to that part of town. At least, some things stayed lost. Thank goodness.

He wept soundly, conjoined forever, he feared, by his own appendages to the recalcitrant ornamentation of the balcony.




Reply With Quote
  #22  
By Nemonymous on 12-05-2009
Re: TLO Member Interview: Nemonymous (2)

I now have a theory about 'The Poshlost Balcony' written above today:-
Can one have hindsight theories about one's own work?
Beware possible spoiler.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
By gveranon on 12-05-2009
Re: TLO Member Interview: Nemonymous (2)

That's a rich, brilliant riff on the notion of a poshlost balcony. I've reread it several times. The observation in the first paragraph is, I think, exactly true as stated in coldly beautiful turns of phrase. Overall, the progression of thought and description is perfectly rendered in appropriately baroque prose.

By odd coincidence, the landfill of detached balconies reminds me of something Nabokov said -- specifically, a witty comment he made about J. L. Borges. My only source for this is an essay by John Barth, so I will quote Barth here: ". . . Vladimir Nabokov once said mischievously that when he and Vera first discovered Borges's writings, they felt as if they were standing on a wondrous portico -- and then they discovered that there was no house." (From "Borges and I: a mini-memoir" in Barth's collection Further Fridays.)
Reply With Quote
  #24  
By Nemonymous on 12-06-2009
Re: TLO Member Interview: Nemonymous (2)

Quote Originally Posted by gveranon View Post
By odd coincidence, the landfill of detached balconies reminds me of something Nabokov said -- specifically, a witty comment he made about J. L. Borges. My only source for this is an essay by John Barth, so I will quote Barth here: ". . . Vladimir Nabokov once said mischievously that when he and Vera first discovered Borges's writings, they felt as if they were standing on a wondrous portico -- and then they discovered that there was no house." (From "Borges and I: a mini-memoir" in Barth's collection Further Fridays.)
Thanks! This thread's responses have been a revelation to me and an inspiration. The Liszt Balcony, the John Barth quote above .... and so on.
John Barth was a writer who inspired me early on, starting with 'The Sot Weed Factor' (late 1960s??). Nabokov's ADA a little later.
Balconies have turned out so far to be very fruitful since I thought of the title 'The Last Balcony' a few weeks ago.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
By Nemonymous on 12-11-2009
Re: TLO Member Interview: Nemonymous (2)

I've suddenly realised that 'The Last Balcony' derives from some wording in EGNIS (a story I wrote in the early 1980s and published in the 'Weirdmonger' book in 2003) and here read aloud:
http://www.filefactory.com/file/ah8054f/n/VN650041_WMA .
Reply With Quote
  #26  
By Nemonymous on 12-14-2009
Re: TLO Member Interview: Nemonymous (2)

Amazingly, this thread already mentions A.S. Byatt and Vladimir Nabokov, and, so, even more amazingly, there were two quite separate hour-long programmes last night back to back on BBC4 TV respectively about Vladimir Nabokov and A.S. Byatt. ASB is probably my favourite living fiction writer and I've been interested over the years in the fiction of VN. Serendipitously, both programmes contained much material concerning matters that have preoccupied me about fiction all my life - latterly with Nemonymity and (Dis)Connectedness - as well as being extremely interesting in themselves concerning the writing and non-writing lives of these two writers.
A televisual feast of non-visual creativity. When will we see the like of it again?
Did anyone else see these programmes?
Reply With Quote
  #27  
By Nemonymous on 12-14-2009
Re: TLO Member Interview: Nemonymous (2)

Quote Originally Posted by Nemonymous View Post
Amazingly, this thread already mentions A.S. Byatt and Vladimir Nabokov, and, so, even more amazingly, there were two quite separate hour-long programmes last night back to back on BBC4 TV respectively about Vladimir Nabokov and A.S. Byatt. ASB is probably my favourite living fiction writer and I've been interested over the years in the fiction of VN. Serendipitously, both programmes contained much material concerning matters that have preoccupied me about fiction all my life - latterly with Nemonymity and (Dis)Connectedness - as well as being extremely interesting in themselves concerning the writing and non-writing lives of these two writers.
A televisual feast of non-visual creativity. When will we see the like of it again?
Did anyone else see these programmes?
Thanks to Allyson Bird, you can see both programmes here:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode...m_Like_Lolita/
http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode...s_To_AS_Byatt/


Quote
They were glove puppets, and glove puppets were of the earth, earthy. They spring up from below, like underground beings, gnomes or dwarves, they belabour each other with cudgels and go back into the depths, of their booths, of our human consciousness. Marionettes, by contrast, are creatures of the upper air, like elves, like sylphs, who barely touch the ground. They dance in geometric perfection in a world more intense, less hobbledehoy, than our own. Heinrich von Kleist, in a suggestive and mysterious essay, claims daringly that these figures perform more perfectly than human actors. They exhibit the laws of movement; their limbs rise and fall in perfect arcs, according to the law of physics. They have – unlike human actors – no need to charm, or to exact sympathy. Kleist goes so far as to say that the puppet and God are two points on a circle.

-- from 'The Children's Book' (2009) by A.S. Byatt
Last edited by Nemonymous; 12-14-2009 at 03:45 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #28  
By gveranon on 12-14-2009
Re: TLO Member Interview: Nemonymous (2)

I've never read anything by A. S. Byatt, but the passage you quoted makes me want to. Unfortunately the iplayer TV episodes can only be viewed inside the UK due to some kind of legal restriction.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
By Nemonymous on 12-17-2009
Re: TLO Member Interview: Nemonymous (2)

It has, today, suddenly occurred to me, out of nowhere, that the proposed title of my fiction collection to be published by Ex Occidente Press (Romania), may have been strangely pre-determined in some unpredictable or retro-causal way.
At apparent face value, then, I have long been intrigued (without a full understanding of its historical context) by the TV pictures of Ceausescu's last appearance on a balcony, amid boos and jeers from the crowds below that shocked him into the state of a dysfunctional puppet. He was, I recall, hustled away, never to be seen in public again.

The scene is mentioned here in a Google book (involving the expression 'last balcony'): http://tinyurl.com/yc2dhkh

When the title ('The Last Balcony') genuinely came to my mind for the first time in October in this discussion forum: http://www.knibbworld.com/campbell-c...9324#POST39324 it is true to say that the long-held memory of Ceausescu on his last balcony was the furthest thing from my conscious mind.

'The Last Balcony' by DF Lewis is advertised as forthcoming here: http://www.exoccidente.com/future.html
Reply With Quote
Comment

Bookmarks

Tags
interview, member, nemonymous, tlo

Article Tools Search this Article
Search this Article:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Article Article Starter Category Comments Last Post
TLO Member Interview: MorganScorpion G. S. Carnivals Member Interviews 8 09-27-2009 05:32 PM
TLO Member Interview: g G. S. Carnivals Member Interviews 3 08-20-2009 11:29 PM
TLO Member Interview: Mr. D. G. S. Carnivals Member Interviews 21 05-13-2009 09:40 PM
TLO Member Interview: Spotbowserfido2 G. S. Carnivals Member Interviews 8 04-02-2009 05:17 AM
TLO Member Interview: Nemonymous Aetherwing Member Interviews 18 11-10-2008 09:38 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:40 PM.



Style Based on SONGS OF A DEAD DREAMER as Published by Silver Scarab Press
Design and Artwork by Harry Morris
Emulated in Hell by Dr. Bantham
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Template-Modifications by TMS

Article powered by GARS 2.1.9 ©2005-2006