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Old 07-02-2013   #1
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Topic Nominated Antinatalism - list of books, articles and quotes (last update: 25.09.2017)

Akerma Karim

Books about antinatalism:

Soll eine Menschheit sein? Eine fundamentalethische Frage, Traude Junghans, Cuxhaven-Dartford 1995 (German language)

Verebben der Menschheit?: Neganthropie und Anthropodizee, Verlag Karl Alber, Freiburg im Breisgau 2000 (German language)

Antinatalismus - Ein Handbuch, epubli, 2017 (German language)

Articles about antinatalism:

Sollen Ausserirdische sein?, Ausserirdische Einleitung in die Philosophie, Münster, 2002 (German language)

Theodicy shading off into Anthropodicy in Milton, Twain and Kant, Tabula Rasa. Die Kulturzeitung aus Mitteldeutschland 2010, No 49

Von der Existenzverwünschung zur Daseins-Anklage. Antinatalismus in Georges Poulets unbekanntem Meisterwerk Rien n'est..., Tabula Rasa. Zeitung für Gesellschaft und Kultur, Januar 2012 (German language)

Was ist Antinatalismus?, Tabula Rasa. Zeitung für Gesellschaft und Kultur, April 2014 (German language)

Manifest zum antinatalismus. Zur ethik des antinatalismus für nachkommenlosigkeit bei Mensch und tier, Pro iure animalis, July 2014 (German language)

Quotes:

Among the people who are created there are always some who will have to suffer unspeakably. This fact, having been considered not only by Schopenhauer and so-called pessimists, should urge any person to philosophize who is prepared to have a closer look only – and especially – at the 20th century. So far nobody has succeeded in demonstrating that the inconceivable though countless times inflicted suffering upon human beings, in Auschwitz and elsewhere throughout time and space, can be compensated for by former or the future happiness of the sufferers or other people.

- Karim Akerma, Verebben der Menschheit?: Neganthropie und Anthropodizee, Verlag Karl Alber, Freiburg im Breisgau 2000, p. 9 -

There is no natural necessity for the existence of human beings. Procreation falls ever-increasingly into the realm of culture. Mankind would die out if nobody carried on the “torch of life”. And shouldn’t we be in favour of mankind’s relatively humane dying out rather than advocating a continuation of the way of suffering?

- Karim Akerma, Verebben der Menschheit?: Neganthropie und Anthropodizee, Verlag Karl Alber, Freiburg im Breisgau 2000, p. 17 -

Only by means of relative or absolute childlessness, resulting in mankind’s ebbing away, could happen what might be named – borrowing from the Greek myth – Sisyphus’s revolt. He would give up his work, not in order to commit suicide but rather by refraining from having children who otherwise would have taken his spot. In such a way that in some point in time there would be no one in the rock’s path which would eventually roll out. In terms of the Asian primordial decision: By means of abstention from procreation the wheel of suffering would be deprived of its impetus until it comes to a standstill.

- Karim Akerma, Verebben der Menschheit?: Neganthropie und Anthropodizee, Verlag Karl Alber, Freiburg im Breisgau 2000, p. 378 -

I suggest people should refrain from procreation as the good things in life do not compensate for the bad things and, first and foremost, the best things do not compensate for the worst things. The experience of unspeakable pain, the agonies of the wounded, sick or dying are not counterbalanced by the delight the sufferer experienced earlier in life; nor is the suffering of the inmates of concentration camps neutralized by many contemporary peoples’ well-being.

- Karim Akerma, Historically informed anti-natalism, official website, 2011 -

Is there a moral reason to procreate with respect to the pleasure one’s offspring would experience? I think not. Is there a moral reason not to procreate regarding the pain one’s offspring would experience? I think the answer should be yes. Why is this so? Apparently, pleasure and pain do not count equally. Pain seems to weigh more, ethically speaking, than pleasure. This seems to be confirmed if we move to decisions and their reversal. Consider couple C who have decided not to procreate as they think their children would be miserable because of their genetic disposition. One day they are informed this was wrong. Their children would be extremely well off. Now consider couple D who have decided to procreate because they think their children would lead happy lives. One day they are informed their children would suffer extreme pain from the first day on. Apparently there is more reason for couple D to reverse their decision than there is for couple C. Which is to say: Expected pain outweighs expected pleasure by far. In ethics, pleasure and pain do not seem to be on a par.

- Karim Akerma, Historically informed anti-natalism, official website, 2011 -

Let me clarify this with respect to the institution of the slaughterhouse: The pleasure most people derive from eating meat is inextricably interwoven with intense suffering on the part of the animals that are raised and slaughtered. The animals’ suffering is not compensated for by the fun most people experience when they eat meat. Pointing to some animals that have decent lives and are killed painlessly is to no avail. In a similar manner, the joy that a considerable number of people experience in their lives is built upon an ocean of suffering. As every procreation implies a lottery (genetically and socially) and as history has revealed to us what man is capable of doing to his counterpart, any decision to procreate should be reversed. – While there is no such reason to reverse a decision not to procreate regarding those few who would presumably lead decent lives and die pain- and fearlessly.

- Karim Akerma, Historically informed anti-natalism, official website 2011 -

There is yet another aspect in Kant’s philosophy that dooms any attempts to create an anthropodicy. In a similar fashion to Milton and Twain, Kant acknowledges that a person brought into existence is brought into existence without having requested it. This, however, cannot be reconciled with the following Kantian decree from his Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals: “So act as to treat humanity, whether in thine own person or in that of any other, in every case as an end withal, never as a means only.” (Quoted in Ethics: The Study of Moral Values, by M. J. Adler and S. Cain, Encyclopedia Britannica, inc. Chicago-London 1962, p. 219) Any Kantian will have to face the precept never to reduce a human being to a means but always to treat her also as an end. Now, someone who does not exist yet, cannot be treated as a means. Neither can he be treated as an end. However, when deciding to procreate, parents inevitably conceive of the future person rather as a means than an end. They cannot, ontologically speaking, procreate for the sake of the person who will exist. They can, however, procreate in the pursuit of their own happiness or their country’s well-being. Note well that parents and countries do exist already. Creating a new human being inevitably goes along with conveiving of a human being as a means without being able to treat him as an end. The parents, the family or the institutions for the benefit of which the new person might exist do already exist, while the person that is conceived of does not exist yet. There is an asymmetry here inasmuch as procreation yields new people for the sake of existing people or institutions while procreation will never benefit someone who does not yet exist. To repeat the aforementioned: Someone could object that – in the same manner in which they cannot be treated also as an end – future people cannot be treated as a means as they do not exist yet. Looked at from a different point of view, from the point of view of imminent procreation, the argument is not convincing: If people procreate, pre-existing parental or societal needs, wishes, aspirations or demands are fulfilled (or not). The same does not apply to those who will start to exist because, had their parents not procreated, there wouldn’t have been thwarted needs and wishes on the child's part. Procreation always involves pre-existing ends into which a new person fits as a means. Regarding procreation, it is not possible for us to treat non-existing future persons also as an end, whereas it is possible to conceive of them as a means. Therefore, in light of the Kantian request to always treat persons also as an end, we had rather not procreate.

- Karim Akerma, Theodicy shading off into Anthropodicy in Milton, Twain and Kant, Tabula Rasa. Die Kulturzeitung aus Mitteldeutschland 2010, No 49 -

Al-Ma'arri Abul 'ala

Quotes:

Better for Adam and all who issued forth from his loins that he and they, yet unborn, created never had been! For whilst his body was dust and rotten bones in the earth. Ah, did he feel what his children saw and suffered of woe?

- Reynold Alleyne Nicholson, Studies in Islamic Poetry, Cambridge University Press, New York 1969, p. 74 -

Whenever I reflect, my reflecting upon what I suffer only rouses me to blame him that begot me. And I gave peace to my children, for they are in the bliss of nonexistence which surpasses all the pleasures of this world. Had they come to life, they would have endured a misery casting them to destruction in trackless wildernesses.

- Reynold Alleyne Nicholson, Studies in Islamic Poetry, Cambridge University Press, New York 1969, p. 139 -

If ye unto your sons would prove
By act how dearly them ye love
Then every voice of wisdom joins
To bid you leave them in your loins

- Reynold Alleyne Nicholson, Studies in Islamic Poetry, Cambridge University Press, New York 1969, p. 139 -

The rich man desires a son to inherit his wealth, but were the fathers intelligent no children would be born.

- Reynold Alleyne Nicholson, Studies in Islamic Poetry, Cambridge University Press, New York 1969, p. 139 -

Procreation is a sin, though not called one.

- Reynold Alleyne Nicholson, Studies in Islamic Poetry, Cambridge University Press, New York 1969, p. 139 -

To beget is to increase the sum of evil.

- Reynold Alleyne Nicholson, Studies in Islamic Poetry, Cambridge University Press, New York 1969, p. 139 -

It is better for a people, instead of multiplying, to perish off the face of the earth.

- Reynold Alleyne Nicholson, Studies in Islamic Poetry, Cambridge University Press, New York 1969, p. 139 -

Refrain from procreation, for its consequence is death.

- Reynold Alleyne Nicholson, Studies in Islamic Poetry, Cambridge University Press, New York 1969, p. 140 -

My father has perpetrated this crime against me; I am guilty of none.
(Al-Ma'arri is said to have wanted this verse inscribed over his grave.) Other translation:
This wrong was by my father done to me, but ne'er by me to one.

- Sami Ayad Hanna, Arab Socialism, Brill Archive, Leiden 1969, p. 257 -
- Dalya Cohen-Mor, Fathers and sons in the Arab Middle East, Palgrave Macmillan, New York 2013, p. 139 -

Allen Woody

Quotes:

My wife and I had not brought any children into this world, instead we had adopted. But having your own children is not a beautiful thing. Maybe I am wrong, maybe I am too hard. But I think I'm not doin' someone a big favour by giving him life.

- Kinder selbst zu produzieren, ist keine schöne Sache, Welt, 09.11.2006 -

Annaba Philippe

Books about antinatalism:

Bienheureux les stériles, Presses du Midi, Toulon 2002 (French language)

Le Berceau, Presses du Midi, Toulon 2005, novel (French language)

Quotes:

Birth is the driving wheel of all ills.

- Philippe Annaba, Bienheureux les stériles, Presses du Midi, Toulon 2002 -

Audians

Quotes about Audians:

Because the Audians saw every part of the human body as being ruled by the seven evil powers, they rejected procreation and denied the resurrection of.

- Roelof van den Broek, Gnostic Religion in Antiquity, Cambridge University Press, New York 2013, p. 168 -

Augustine of Hippo

Quotes:

But I am aware of some that murmur: What, say they, if all men should abstain from all sexual intercourse, whence will the human race exist? Would that all would this, only in „charity out of a pure heart, and good conscience, and faith unfeigned”; much more speedily would the City of God be filled, and the end of the world hastened.

- Philip Schaff, Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers: First Series, volume III St. Augustine: On the Holy Trinity, Doctrinal Treatises, Moral Treatises, Cosimo, New York 2007, p. 404 -

Barker Clive

Quotes:

I think babies cry when they’re born because they’re born with the knowledge of all the terrible #### that’s gonna happen to them. That’s why I never had kids. Every life is a death sentence. We just forget it later in life, like dreams we lose the second we wake up. Whether we worry about it or not, the ####’s still going to fly.

- Lana

- Clive Barker, The Scarlet Gospels, St. Martin's Press, New York 2015, p. 296 -

Barnes Djuna

Quotes about Djuna Barnes:

Miss Barnes sees life and the perpetuation of life as a mistake; indeed, the mistake is to be alive, and then by procreation, to compound that error and produce more tragedy and pain.

- James B. Scott, Djuna Barnes, Twayne Publishers, 1976, p. 24 -

Because of its emphasis upon human bestiality and the need for mankind not to take the world seriously and to abstain from procreation, the thought of Djuna Barnes, if we wish to label it in any systematic way, would have to be called Saturninian Christian in character.

- Andres Field, Djuna, the formidable Miss Barnes, University of Texas Press, 1985, p. 170 -

Homosexuality seems hardly the issue, for Nightwood neither defends nor condemns it, except in one oblique way. Given that life is suffering, the greatest crime would be procreation, which seems to give homosexuality the edge as a preferred lifestyle, since it promotes the extinction of the human species.

- Phillip F. Herring, Djuna: the life and work of Djuna Barnes, Viking, 1995, p. 207 -

Barnes, on the other hand, shunned procreation and associated childbirth with death.

- Peter Friedrich Monahan, The American Wild Man: The Science and Theatricality of Nondescription in the Works of Edgar Allan Poe, Jack London, and Djuna Barnes, ProQuest, 2008, p. 206 -

Beckett Samuel

Quotes:

They give birth astride of a grave, the light gleams an instant, then it's night once more.

- Pozzo

- Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot, 1953 -

Astride of a grave and a difficult birth. Down in the hole, lingeringly, the grave digger puts on the forceps. We have time to grow old. The air is full of our cries.

- Vladimir

- Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot, 1953 -

No, I regret nothing, all I regret is having been born, dying is such a long tiresome business I always found.

- Samuel Beckett, The Complete Short Prose, 1929-1989, Abandoned Work, Grove Press, New York 1995, p. 158 -

Quotes about Samuel Beckett:

‘No,’ he replied, when I asked him if he had ever wanted children, ‘that's one thing I'm proud of.’

- Lawrence Shainberg, Exorcising Beckett, The Paris review No. 104, Fall 1987 -

It is the human will that for him is the prime mover towards action, and the human will is evil, leading mankind to evil deeds and the perpetuation through procreation of more evil.

- John Calder, The philosophy of Samuel Beckett, Calder, 2001, p. 25 -

Sex is always portrayed in Beckett with a mixture of fascination and disgust. His disgust, well described in his fictions, of the whole process of generation is rooted in a philosophical conviction: bringing life into an evil world must be evil, therefore the circumstances of birth with all their mess of blood and water and pain become not only unpleasant, but part of that evil.

- John Calder, The philosophy of Samuel Beckett, Calder, 2001, p. 53 -

As Beckett speculated about the creation of the world, he increasingly envisaged the creator as a monster, but not necessarily a conscious one. The only way to frustrate that God (or nature) was to produce no children, and Beckett was true to his own principle.

- John Calder, The philosophy of Samuel Beckett, Calder, 2001, P. 130 -

Time and again he targets parents as irresponsible criminals although, of course, in life courtesy prevented him from expressing his real feelings. Hamm denounces his parents in ‘Endgame’ as ‘accursed progenitors’ and Molloy is bitterly unable to forgive his mother for bringing him into the world. In private I knew Beckett to express a passive anger at those who insisted on having families.

- John Calder, The philosophy of Samuel Beckett, Calder, 2001, p. 130 -

Benatar David

Books about antinatalism:

Better Never to Have Been: The Harm of Coming Into Existence, Oxford University Press, New York 2006

Procreation and Parenthood: The Ethics of Bearing and Rearing Children, Oxford University Press, New York, 2010, co-author with David Archard

Debating Procreation: Is It Wrong To Reproduce?, Oxford University Press, New York 2015, co-author with David Wasserman

The Human Predicament A Candid Guide to Life's Biggest Questions, Oxford University Press, New York 2017

Articles about antinatalism:

Why it is Better Never to Come Into Existence, American Philosophical Quarterly 1997, volume 34, number 3, pp. 345-355

Every Conceivable Harm:A Further Defence of Anti-Natalism, South African Journal of Philosophy 2012, volume 31, number 1, pp. 128-164

Still Better Never to Have Been: A Reply to (More of) My Critics, The Journal of Ethics 2013, 17 (1-2), pp. 121-151

Quotes:

It is curious that while good people go to great lengths to spare their children from suffering, few of them seem to notice that the one (and only) guaranteed way to prevent all the suffering of their children is not to bring those children into existence in the first place.

- David Benatar, Better Never to Have Been: The Harm of Coming into Existence, Oxford University Press Inc., New York 2006, p. 6 (introduction) -

Nor is the harm produced by the creation of a child usually restricted to that child. The child soon finds itself motivated to procreate, producing children who, in turn, develop the same desire. Thus any pair of procreators can view themselves as occupying the tip of a generational iceberg of suffering. They experience the bad in their own lives. In the ordinary course of events they will experience only some of the bad in their children’sand possibly grandchildren’s lives (because these offspring usually survive their progenitors), but beneath the surface of the current generations lurk increasingly larger numbers of descendents and their misfortunes. Assuming that each couple has three children,an original pair’s cumulative descendents over ten generations amount to 88,572 people. That constitutes a lot of pointless, avoidable suffering. To be sure, full responsibility for it all does not lie with the original couple because each new generation faces the choice of whether to continue that line of descendents. Nevertheless, they bear some responsibility for the generations that ensue. If one does not desist from having children, one can hardly expect one’s descendents to do so.

- David Benatar, Better Never to Have Been: The Harm of Coming into Existence, Oxford University Press Inc., New York 2006, pp. 6-7 (introduction) -

A few of my critics have claimed that I am committed to the desirability of suicide and even speciecide. They clearly intend this as a reductio ad absurdum of my position. However, I considered the questiions of suicide and speciecide in Better Never to Have Been and argued that these are not implications of my view. First, it is possible to think that both coming into existence is a serious harm and that death is (usually) a serious harm. Indeed, some people might think that coming into existence is a serious harm in part because the harm of death is then inevitable.

- David Benatar, Still Better Never to Have Been: A Reply to (More of) My Critics, The Journal of Ethics 2013, 17 (1-2), p. 148 -

To procreate is thus to engage in a kind of Russian roulette, but one in which the “gun” is aimed not at oneself but instead at one’s offspring. You trigger a new life and thereby subject that new life to the risk of unspeakable suffering.

- David Benatar, Debating Procreation: Is It Wrong To Reproduce?, Oxford University Press, New York 2015, p. 65 -

Bernhard Thomas

Quotes:

Even at the risk of being thought mad, we must not be afraid to say that our parents, like theirs before them, were guilty of the crime of procreation, which means the crime of creating unhappiness, of conspiring with others to increase the unhappiness of an increasingly unhappy world.

- Thomas Bernhard, Gathering evidence: a memoir, Knopf, New York 1985 (1981), p. 113 -

There are absolutely no parents; there are only criminals who are progenitors of new human beings, whose procreative act with all its absurdity and stupidity is directed against those who are created.

- Thomas Bernhard, Gathering evidence: a memoir, Knopf, New York 1985 (1981) -

People who make a new person are taking an extraordinary responsibility upon themselves. All unrealizable. Hopeless. It's a great crime to create a person, when you know he'll be unhappy, certainly if there's any unhappiness about. The unhappiness that exists momentarily is the whole of unhappiness. To produce solitude just because you don’t want to be alone anymore yourself is a crime. The drive of nature is criminal, and to appeal to it is a pretext, just as everything people do is a pretext.

- Maler Strauch

- Thomas Bernhard, Frost: A Novel, Knopf, New York 2010 (1963), pp. 28-29 -

Bleibohm Gunter

Books about antinatalism:

Fluch der Geburt - Thesen einer Uberlebensethik, Edition Gegensich, Landau-Godramstein 2011 (German language)

Bogomils

Quotes:

However, one heretical doctrine mentioned by Theophylact is of a non-Paulician origin: the heretics, he writes, reject lawful marriage and maintain that the reproduction of the human species is a law of the demon. This exaggerated and distorted asceticism, essentially characteristic of Bogomilism, is a logical consequence of metaphysical dualism, according to which Matter, the product of the Evil Principle, is a source of limitation and suffering for the divinely created soul; hence marriage, as the means of reproduction of Matter, is to be condemned and avoided.

- Dimitri Obolensky, The Bogomils: A Study in Balkan Neo-Manichaeism, Cambridge University Press, New York 2004, p. 114 -

Since sexual reproduction perpetuated the prison of the soul, ascetic life was viewed as a key to salvation.

- Florin Curta, Southeastern Europe in the Middle Ages, 500-1250, Cambridge University Press, New York 2006, p. 236 -

They rejected procreation and marriage; they despised work, riches, honours, social distinctions.

- Jacques Lacarrière, The Gnostics, Owen, London 1977, p. 116 -

Brach-Czaina Jolanta

Quotes:

The formula of childbirth is: let the current state of affairs continue. Unbelievable message. “Forget about suffering, stop rebelling.” This means acceptance of everything that happens, suggests that existence has an indisputable value. It also turns out that existence is not as independent of our will as we might think, but we are the ones who make the final gesture of consent. And therefore, we are responsible.

- Jolanta Brach-Czaina, Szczeliny istnienia, Wydawnictwo eFKa, Krakow 1999, p. 48 -

Brune Elisa

Quotes:

Procreation is something impossible for me. I would never forgive myself put someone on death row.

- Elisa Brune, La mort dans l'âme: tango avec Cioran, Odile Jacob, Paris 2011 -

Buddha Siddhartha Gautama

Quotes:

Now this, monks, is the noble truth of dukkha: birth is dukkha, aging is dukkha, death is dukkha; sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief, & despair are dukkha; association with the unbeloved is dukkha; separation from the loved is dukkha; not getting what is wanted is dukkha. In short, the five clinging-aggregates are dukkha.
And this, monks is the noble truth of the origination of dukkha: the craving that makes for further becoming - accompanied by passion & delight, relishing now here & now there - i.e., craving for sensual pleasure, craving for becoming, craving for non-becoming.
And this, monks, is the noble truth of the cessation of dukkha: the remainderless fading & cessation, renunciation, relinquishment, release, & letting go of that very craving.
And this, monks, is the noble truth of the way of practice leading to the cessation of dukkha: precisely this Noble Eightfold Path: right view, right resolve, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration.

- Four Noble Truths -

From Ignorance spring the samkhâras, from the samkhâras springs Consciousness, from Consciousness spring Name-and-Form, from Name-and-Form spring the six Provinces, from the six Provinces springs Contact, from Contact springs Sensation, from Sensation springs Thirst (or Desire), from Thirst springs Attachment, from Attachment springs Existence, from Existence springs Birth, from Birth spring Old Age and Death, grief, lamentation, suffering, dejection, and despair. Such is the origination of this whole mass of suffering. Again, by the destruction of Ignorance, which consists in the complete absence of lust, the samkhâras are destroyed, by the destruction of the samkhâras Consciousness is destroyed, by the destruction of Consciousness Name-and-Form are destroyed, by the destruction of Name-and-Form the six Provinces are destroyed, by the destruction of the six Provinces Contact is destroyed, by the destruction of Contact Sensation is destroyed, by the destruction of Sensation Thirst is destroyed, by the destruction of Thirst Attachment is destroyed, by the destruction of Attachment Existence is destroyed, by the destruction of Existence Birth is destroyed, by the destruction of Birth Old Age and Death, grief, lamentation, suffering, dejection, and despair are destroyed. Such is the cessation of this whole mass of suffering.

- Mahavagga -

Quotes about Siddhartha Gautama Buddha:

Buddh states his propositions in the pedantic style of his age. He throws them into a form of Sorites; but, as such, it is logically faulty and all he wishes to convey is this: Oblivious of the suffering to which life is subject, man begets children, and is thus the cause of old age and death. If he would only realize what suffering he would add to by his act, he would desist from the procreation of children; and so stop the operation of old age and death.

- Hari Singh Gour, The Spirit of Buddhism, Kessinger Publishing, Whitefish, Montana 2005 (1929), pp. 286-288 -

Byron George

Quotes:

To give birth to those
Who can but suffer many years, and die,
Methinks is merely propagating death,
And multiplying murder.

- Cain

- George Byron, Cain, Cain and Other Shorter Works, Wildside Press LLC, 2008 (1821), p. 48 -

Cabrera Julio

Books about antinatalism:

Projeto de etica negativa, Edicões Mandacaru, Sao Paolo 1989 (Portuguese language), second edition: A Ética e Suas Negações, Não nascer, suicídio e pequenos assassinatos, Rocco, Rio De Janeiro 2011 (Portuguese language)

Critica de La Moral Afirmativa: Una Reflexion Sobre Nacimiento, Muerte y Valor de La Vida, Gedisa Editorial, Barcelona 1996 (Spanish language), English version: A critique of affirmative morality - a reflection on death, birth and the value of life, Brasília: Julio Cabrera Editions, 2014

Ética Negativa: problemas e discussões, UFG, Goiânia 2008 (Portuguese language)

Porque te amo, Não nascerás! Nascituri te salutant, LGE Editora, Brasilia 2009, co-author with Thiago Lenharo di Santis (Portuguese language)

Articles about antinatalism:

O que é realmente ética negativa. Clarificações e novos pensamentos, Poliedro. Phases of philosophy, Publit Publisher, Rio de Janeiro 2006 (Portuguese language)

Ética e condição humana: notas para uma fundamentação natural da moral (contendo uma crítica da fundamentação da moral de Ernst Tugendhat), Ética. Questões de fundamentação. UnB Publisher, Brasília 2007 (Portuguese language)

Impossibilidades da moral: filosofia da existência, naturalismo e ética negativa, Filosofia Unisinos 13, Oct 2012, pp. 296-310 (Portuguese language)

Quotes:

In the light of natural ontology, it is not correct the argument that we do not know anything about our possible offsprings, for example, about the capacity they will have to overcome structural pain; because even we do not know, for example, whether they will enjoy traveling, working or studying classical languages, we do know they will be indigent, decadent, vacating beings who will start dying since birth, who will face and be characterized by systematic dysfunctions, who will have to constitute their own beings as beings-against-the-others – in the sense of dealing with aggressiveness and having to discharge it over others – who will lose those they love and be lost by those who love them, and time will take everything they manage to build.

- Julio Cabrera, A critique of affirmative morality - a reflection on death, birth and the value of life, Julio Cabrera Editions, Brasília 2014 -

''I sent him there because I know he is strong and he will manage well''. The ''strengths'' of the newborn do not relieve in anything the moral responsibility of the procreator. Anyone would answer: “This is irrelevant. Your role in the matter consisted of sending people to a situation you know was difficult and painful and you could avoid it. Your predictions about their reacting manners do not decrease in anything your responsibility”. In the case of procreation, the reasoning could be the same, and in a notorious emphatic way, since in any intra-worldly situation with already existing people in which we send someone to a position known as painful, the other one could always run away from pain to the extent his being is already in the world and he could predict danger and try to avoid being exposed to a disregarding and manipulative maneuver. In the case of the one who is being born, by contrast, this is not possible at all because it is precisely his very being that is being manufactured and used. Concerning birth, therefore, manipulation seems to be total.

- Julio Cabrera, A critique of affirmative morality - a reflection on death, birth and the value of life, Julio Cabrera Editions, Brasília 2014 -

Thus, whoever has said to procreate for love, as others kill for hate, might have said a truth, but, no doubt, this person has not given any moral justification for procreation. Saying you have had a child “for love” is a manner of saying you have had him or her compulsively, according to the wild rhythms of life. In a similar way, we might intensely love our parents and, at the same time, consider fatherhood ethically-rationally problematic, and visualize we have been manipulated by them. I may continue to love after having detected immorality, there is nothing contradictory on that. Neither would morally justify a homicide saying we have done it for hate, nor a suicide saying we have done it “for hate against ourselves”. Something can continue to be ethically problematic even when guided by love.

- Julio Cabrera, A critique of affirmative morality - a reflection on death, birth and the value of life, Julio Cabrera Editions, Brasília 2014 -

In order to make it easy I will summarize three lines presented in my text: (1) to question the usual idea that when we make someone to born we are giving him something „valuable”; (2) To point out to the inevitable 'manipulation' inherent to the act of procreate; (3) To problematize the idea that, if someone could give his opinion, he would ask us to make him born. That been said, it’s possible to understand the notion of „morality” that is been used, according to which, it’s not correct: (1) to give someone something we consider to be not valuable; (2) to manipulate him; (3) to disrespect his autonomy. I believe that those three things happen when we procreate. This philosophical result may lead many people to extend (beyond the usual) their moral scruples, or may lead them to show clearly and without any hypocrisy how unscrupulous they are willing to be, or could even lead to a refutation (by absurd) of the moral point of view about the world.

- Julio Cabrera, Thiago Lenharo di Santis, Porque te amo, Não nascerás! Nascituri te salutant, LGE Editora, Brasília 2009, pp. 23-24 -

Would a genuinely rational agent choose to be born? One can reread my argumentation against R.M. Hare, in ''A critique of affirmative morality'' [...]. There I suggest that, in the experiment where the non-being is magically consulted about its possible birth, Hare is wrong in supposing uncritically that “he” would choose, without a doubt, to be born. (This is the habitual affirmative tendency). Because we suppose that he is human, that is, a rational creature capable of pondering reasons. The information that is given that possible being, in Hare’s experiment, is incomplete and biased. We should also tell him that, if he is born, he does not have any guarantee of being born without problems; that, if he manages to be born problem-free, he will suffer, almost surely, of many intra-world evils; that, if he manages to get rid of them (and this is intraworldly possible, although hard), we cannot give him any reassurance about his life span, nor about the kind of death he will have, besides having to suffer the death of those he comes to love and having his death being suffered by those who love him (if he is lucky of loving someone and of being loved by someone, which is not guaranteed either). One would also have to say to him that, if he manages to avoid a violent accidental death, he will deteriorate in fairly scarce years (just as the people he loves and cares about), and that he has a high chance of becoming terminally ill who could suffer terribly until the time of his demise. If it were still the case for the non-being that, after having assimilated all this information, he would choose to be born, could not we harbor well-founded reasons to doubt its quality as “rational agent”?

- Julio Cabrera, Thiago Lenharo di Santis, Porque te amo, NÃO nascerás! Nascituri te salutant, pp. 70-71 -

Calderon Pedro

Quotes:

Why haveI provoked thy scorn
By the crime of being born? -
Though for being born I feel
Heaven with me must harshly deal
Since man's greatest crime on earth
Is the fatal fact of birth -

- Pedro Calderon, Life is a dream, The Floating Press, Auckland 2009 (1635), p. 26 -

Cassianus Julius

Quotes:

The first is a dialogue between Jesus and Salome. She asks, „How long shall men die?” Jesus answers, „As long as you women bear children.” Writers like Julius Cassianus take this as an implicit injunction to defeat death by ceasing from procreation.

- John T. Noonan Jr., Contraception; a history of its treatment by the Catholic theologians and canonists, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts 2012, p. 61 -

Full text of this dialogue (Greek Gospel of the Egyptians):

Salome: „How long shall men die?”
Jesus Christ: „As long as you women bear children.”
Salome: „I have done well, then, in not bearing children?”
Jesus Christ: „Every plant eat thou, but that which hath bitterness eat not. I have come to destroy the works of the female.”

Cathars

Quotes about Cathars:

The doctrine of Catharism opposed sexual intercourse that led to procreation because it was thought that „the devil had given seed to the children of the world”.

- Margot Joan Fromer, Ethical issues in sexuality and reproduction, Mosby, St. Louis 1983, p. 110 -

The Cathars believed the whole of humanity, and each man individually for the children of Satan. Why, then, would serve their reproduction, if not duplication of suffering, and therefore the triumph of Satan.

- Katarzyna Skrzypiec, Sekretna wieczerza, czyli o heretykach budzących sympatię, Mówią Wieki 2009, nr 4 -

To be convinced, we need merely consult Bernard Gui's Practica Inquisitionis or any other report of the period on the ideas and actions of the „heretics”. Here we shall find - a comforting detail - some tanner's wife or, say, a woodcutter's at grips with Lucifer or denouncing our first ancestors as guilty of „the most Satanic of all actions”.

- Emil Cioran, The New Gods, University of Chicago, Chicago 2013 (1969), p. 61 -

Ceronetti Guido

Quotes:

Man dares to allow himself to be cruel, when he's already committed, tranquilly and repeatedly, the crudest act of all: engendering, condemning beings that do not exist or suffer to the horrors of life.

- Guido Ceronetti, The Silence of the Body: Materials for the Study of Medicine, Farrar Straus & Giroux, New York 1993 (1979) -

The immorality of procreation praised as conscious is this: here the crime of making a man, to introduce more evil and pain in the world is not made unconsciously in ecstasy and drama in the darkness of copulation, but is coolly premeditated, people then are no longer cautious and repeat the act until they reach the goal. But there is something even worse: artificial procreation, semen ice, where without the manipulator and the belly person horrified by what they do, lacks even the delight that is some extenuating circumstance.

- Guido Ceronetti, The Silence of the Body: Materials for the Study of Medicine, Farrar Straus & Giroux, New York 1993 (1979) -

As long as they feel like killing, they will not lose the pleasure of begetting.

- Guido Ceronetti, The Silence of the Body: Materials for the Study of Medicine, Farrar Straus & Giroux, New York 1993 (1979) -

If you are a friend of living beings, you must be an enemy of human reproduction. If you love human beings, do not create them.

- Guido Ceronetti, Insetti senza frontiere, Adelphi, Milano 2009 -

I call myself an "undead of Montsegur".

- Guido Ceronetti, ? -

Chah Ajahn

Quotes:

If you're afraid of illnesses, if you are afraid of death, then you should contemplate where they com from? Where do they come from? They arise from birth. So don’t be sad when someone dies, it's just nature, and his suffering in this life is over. If you want to be sad, be sad when people are born: Oh. No, they 've come again. They 're going to suffer and die again!

- Ajahn Chah, No Ajahn Chah: Reflections, Coporate Body of the Buddha Educational Foundation, 1994 -

Our birth and death are just one thing. You can't have one without the other. It's a little funny to see how at a death people are so tearful and sad, and at a birth how happy and delighted. It's delusion. I think if you really want to cry. Then it would be better to do so when someone born. Cry at the root, for if there were no birth, there would be no death. Can you understand this?

- Ajahn Chah, No Ajahn Chah: Reflections, Coporate Body of the Buddha Educational Foundation, 1994 -

Cicero

Quotes:

Best by far not to be born, and not to come up against these rocks of life, but, if you are born, is it next best to escape as it were from fire of fortune as quickly as possible.

- Cicero, Consolation, 45 BC -

de Chateaubriand Francois-Rene

Quotes:

After the misfortune of being born, I do not know any greater than giving birth.

- Francois-Rene de Chateaubriand, Mémoires d'outre-tombe, Première partie, Livre II, Flammarion, Paris 1982 (1848), p. 78 -

Cioran Emil

Books about antinatalism:

The Trouble With Being Born, Seaver Books, New York 1976 (1973)

Quotes:

What sin have you committed to be born, what crime to exist?

- Emil Cioran, A Short History of Decay, Penguin Books, London 2010 (1949), p. 30 -

And our very being - what a mistake, what an injury to have adjoined it to existence, when we might have persevered, intact, in the virtual, the invulnerable! No-one recovers from the disease of being born, a deadly wound if ever there was one. Yet it is with the hope of being cured of it some day that we accept life and endure its ordeals. The years pass, the wound remains.

- Emil Cioran, The Fall Into time, Quadrangle Books, Chicago 1970 (1964), p. 69 -

It is our birth, in fact, that we must attend to if we want to extirpate the evil at its source. We take a stand against death, against what must come; birth, a much more irreparable event, we leave to one side, pay little or no attention to it: to each man it appears as far in the past as the world's first moment. Only a man who plans to suppress himself reaches back that far; it seems he cannot forget the unnamable mechanism of procreation and that he tries, by a retrospective horror, to annihilate the very seed from which he has sprung.

- Emil Cioran, The Fall Into time, Quadrangle Books, Chicago 1970 (1964), pp. 169-170 -

To procreate is to love the scourge - to seek to maintain and to augment it. They were right, those ancient philosophers who identified fire with the principle of the universe, and with desire, for desire burns, devours: annihilates: At once agent and destroyer of beings, it is sombre, it is infernal by essence.

- Emil Cioran, The New Gods, University of Chicago, Chicago 2013 (1969), p. 11 -

In the Council of 1211 against the Bogomils, those among them were anathematized who held that „woman conceives in her womb by the cooperation of Satan, that Satan abides there upon conception without withdrawing hence until the birth of the child”. I dare not suppose that the Devil can be concerned with us to the point of keeping us company for so many months; but I cannot doubt that we have been conceived under his eyes and that he actually attended our beloved begetters.

- Emil Cioran, The New Gods, University of Chicago, Chicago 2013 (1969), p. 62 -

The disgust with the useful aspect of sexuality, the horror of procreation, constitutes part of the interrogation of the creation: what is the good of multiplying monsters?

- Emil Cioran, The New Gods, University of Chicago, Chicago 2013 (1969), p. 62 -

Nothing could persuade me that this world is not the fruit of a dark god whose shadow I extend, and that it is incumbent upon me to exhaust the consequences of the curse hanging over him and his creation.

- Emil Cioran, The New Gods, University of Chicago, Chicago 2013 (1969), p. 89 -

The mediocrity of my grief at funerals. Impossible to feel sorry for the deceased; conversely, every birth casts me into consternation. It is incomprehensible, it is insane that people can show a baby, that they can exhibit this potential disaster and rejoice over it.

- Emil Cioran, The New Gods, University of Chicago, Chicago 2013 (1969), p. 102 -

We do not rush toward death, we flee the catastrophe of birth, survivors struggling to forget it. Fear of death is merely the projection into the future of a fear which dates back to our first moment of life. We are reluctant, of course, to treat birth as a scourge: has it not been inculcated as the sovereign good-have we not been told that the worst came at the end, not at the outset of our lives? Yet evil, the real evil, is behind, not ahead of us. What escaped Jesus did not escape Buddha: „If three things did not exist in the world, disciples, the Perfect One would not appear in the world...” And ahead of old age and death he places the fact of birth, source of every infirmity, every disaster.

- Emil Cioran, The Trouble With Being Born, Seaver Books, New York 1976 (1973), p. 4 -

Nothing is a better proof of how far humanity has regressed than the impossibility of finding a single nation, a single tribe, among whom birth still provokes mourning and lamentations.

- Emil Cioran, The Trouble With Being Born, Seaver Books, New York 1976 (1973), p. 4 -

To have committed every crime but that of being a father.

- Emil Cioran, The Trouble With Being Born, Seaver Books, New York 1976 (1973), p. 6 -

The real, the unique misfortune: to see the light of day. A disaster which dates back to aggressiveness, to the seed of expansion and rage within origins, to the tendency to the worst which first shook them up.

- Emil Cioran, The Trouble With Being Born, Seaver Books, New York 1976 (1973), p. 10 -

It is not my beginnings, it is the beginning that matters to me. If I bump into my birth, into a minor obsession, it is because I cannot grapple with the first moment of time. Every individual discomfort leads back, ultimately, to a cosmogonic discomfort, each of our sensation, by which Being crept out of somewhere.

- Emil Cioran, The Trouble With Being Born, Seaver Books, New York 1976 (1973), p. 16 -

If attachment is an evil, we must look for its cause in the scandal of birth, for to be born is to be attached. Detachment then should apply itself to getting rid of the traces of this scandal, the most serious and intolerable of all.

- Emil Cioran, The Trouble With Being Born, Seaver Books, New York 1976 (1973), p. 19 -

The obsession with birth proceeds from an exacerbation of memory, from an omnipresence of the past, as well as from a craving for the impasse, for the first impasse. - No openness, hence no joy from the past but solely from the present, and from a future emancipated from time.

- Emil Cioran, The Trouble With Being Born, Seaver Books, New York 1976 (1973), pp. 20-21 -

Endlessly to refer to a world where nothing yet stooped to occurrence, where you anticipated consciousness without desiring it, where, wallowing in the virtual, you rejoiced in the null plenitude of a self anterior to selfhood... Not to have been born, merely musing on that—what happiness, what freedom, what space!

- Emil Cioran, The Trouble With Being Born, Seaver Books, New York 1976 (1973), p. 22 -

In Buddhist writings, mention is often made of „the abyss of birth”. An abyss indeed, a gulf into which we do not fall but from which, instead, we emerge, to our universal chagrin.

- Emil Cioran, The Trouble With Being Born, Seaver Books, New York 1976 (1973), p. 33 -

Everything is wonderfully clear if we admit that birth is a disastrous or at least an inopportune event; but if we think otherwise, we must resign ourselves to the unintelligible, or else cheat like everyone else.

- Emil Cioran, The Trouble With Being Born, Seaver Books, New York 1976 (1973), p. 98 -

If it is true that by death we once more become what we were before being, would it not have been better to abide by that pure possibility, not to stir from it? What use was this detour, when we might have remained forever in an unrealized plenitude?

- Emil Cioran, The Trouble With Being Born, Seaver Books, New York 1976 (1973), p. 147 -

I was alone in that cemetery overlooking the village when a pregnant woman came in. I left at once, in order not to look at this corpse-bearer at dose range, nor to ruminate upon the contrast between an aggressive womb and the time-worn tombs-between a false promise and the end of all promises.

- Emil Cioran, The Trouble With Being Born, Seaver Books, New York 1976 (1973), p. 151 -

That faint light in each of us which dates back to before our birth, to before all births, is what must be protected if we want to rejoin that remote glory from which we shall never know why we were separated.

- Emil Cioran, The Trouble With Being Born, Seaver Books, New York 1976 (1973), p. 157 -

When every man has realized that his birth is a defeat, existence, endurable at last, will seem like the day after a surrender, like the relief and the repose of the conquered.

- Emil Cioran, The Trouble With Being Born, Seaver Books, New York 1976 (1973), p. 181 -

Birth and chain are synonyms. To see the light of day, to see shackles...

- Emil Cioran, The Trouble With Being Born, Seaver Books, New York 1976 (1973), p. 211 -

Not to be born is undoubtedly the best plan of all. Unfortunately it is within no one's reach.

- Emil Cioran, The Trouble With Being Born, Seaver Books, New York 1976 (1973), p. 212 -

These children, whom I did not bring into existence, if they only knew what luck they owe me!

- Emil Cioran, Anathemas and admirations, New York 2012 (1987) -

The only reason why I flatter myself, is that I understood very early, before the age of twenty, that one should not procreate. My aversion to marriage, family and all social conventions has its source in this. Crime is to transmit, through procreation, one’s frailties to someone else, to force someone to experience the same things we are experiencing: Gehenna, which may be even worse than our own. Give life to someone who would inherent my miseries - no, I could never consent to this. All parents are irresponsible people, or murderers. Only brutes should deal with procreation. Pity makes you not want to be a „progenitor”. This is the cruelest word I know.

- Emil Cioran, Cahiers, 1957-1972, Gallimard, Paris 1997, p. 125 -

If I were a believer, I would be a Cathar.

- Emil Cioran, Cahiers, 1957-1972, Gallimard, Paris 1997, p. 155 -

Taking into account what I know and feel I could not give life without falling in total contradiction with myself, without committing intellectual dishonesty and moral crime. It is interesting that this attitude is with me for a long time, even before I started to have clear ideas on this subject. Disgust for procreation appeared in my case very early; it was the answer to my terror - no, to my terror and desire in the face of life. I never accepted sexuality outside the sphere of pleasure. Its proper function always aroused in me an irresistible repugnance. I would never voluntarily take responsibility for any life.

- Emil Cioran, Cahiers, 1957-1972, Gallimard, Paris 1997, pp. 546-547 -

Quite near Malesherbes - cemetery in Nanteau, dominating the village and the valley of the same name. I see the young pregnant woman who came with flowers to decorate a grave. Is it possible that she did not think that she bears within itself a mortal, a future cadaver? If there are two things mutually incompatible, it is the image of this audacious fertility among the gloomy crosses, the aggressive protruding belly and the graves, so terribly modest. Promise and the end of all promises! Illusion and its outcome.

- Emil Cioran, Cahiers, 1957-1972, Gallimard, Paris 1997, p. 868 -

I have said more than once that one can have a post-sexual vision of the world, the most desperate vision that is possible: the feeling of having invested everything in something that was not worth it. The extraordinary thing is that we are dealing with a reversible infinity. Sexuality is an immense imposture, a gigantic falsehood that invariably renews itself.

- Emil Cioran, Entretiens, 1957-1972, Gallimard, Paris 1995 -

Death is not a tragedy, birth is a tragedy.

- Cioran - Intervista letteraria con Christian Bussy, 1973 -

Children are the ultimate illusion. This is a compromise, which I would never have agreed: to bring to life being sentenced to death.

- Krzysztof Zabłocki, Cioran - story, Literatura Na Świecie 1990, nr 11, p. 299 -

I accept death, I accept life, but not birth.

- Interview de Simone Boué par Norbert Dodille, Lectures de Cioran, L’Harmattan, Paris 1997, pp. 11-41 -

Clementine Guillaume

Quotes:

Should be issued a decree abolishing birth, we will all die, then it is a sin to give birth.

- Guillaume Clementine, Le petit malheureux, Serpent à plumes, Paris 1999 -

Crawford Jim

Books about antinatalism:

Confessions of an Antinatalist, Nine-Banded Books, Charleston, West Virginia 2010

Quotes:

Life is a mixture of good and bad, or so they say. Trouble is, there’s no way to determine where a particular life might fall along fortune’s spectrum. For every child born into the lap of luxury, there’s another born on the point of a knife. There are no guarantees as to what may transpire as the immediate present unfolds into the uncertain future. Things change in an instant. Two things, however, are certain. Everyone will suffer. And everyone will die. Back to where we came from. Knowing this, and understanding full well that any particular life embodies the potential for experiencing extreme pain and unhappiness unceasing in some cases is procreation really worth the risk?

- Jim Crawford, Confessions of an Antinatalist, Nine-Banded Books, Charleston, West Virginia 2010, back cover -

Crisp Quentin S.

Articles about antinatalism:

Antinatalism: A Thought Experiment, Living in the future 2014, Issue 2, Apocalypses: End Times Past, Present and Future

Quotes:

Murder is the curtailing of a life that would have ended anyway; having a child creates a death that would never have been.

- Quentin S. Crisp, Antinatalism: A Thought Experiment, Living in the future 2014, Issue 2, Apocalypses: End Times Past, Present and Future -

If a child, for whose existence I was responsible, were to ask me why he or she were here, what happens after death, whether I could guarantee he or she would not suffer a fate like that Furuta Junko suffered in 1988/89 (please look it up, as there’s no room to describe it), what would I say? To me, the fact I have no answers that would not be guesswork, evasion or dogma indicates that having children is selfish and cruel.

- Quentin S. Crisp, Antinatalism: A Thought Experiment, Living in the future 2014, issue 2, Apocalypses: End Times Past, Present and Future -

Cynics

Quotes:

Whoever trusts us will remain single; those who do not trust us will rear children. And if the race of men should cease to exist there would be as much cause for regret as there would be if the flies and wasps should pass away.

47th Cynic epistle (wrongly attributed to Diogenes).

Darwesh S'ad

Quotes:

To spare you all that I have seen,
The losses I have sustained,
I withstood the human impulse within.

- Dalya Cohen-Mor, Fathers and sons in the Arab Middle East, Palgrave Macmillan, New York 2013, p. 140 -

dcrf

Quotes:

Is there any doubt that the creation was an act of great violence by God our Father against our Mother the abyss? He made the heavens and the earth and in their image we created our world: every victim of a racial lynching, every target of gendered violence, every abject creature crushed under the weight of imperialist oppression is both the prey of children reenacting the cruelty of their Father and a sacrifice to Him, that He might prevail in keeping the night away from the cold harshness of His day. But, despite all the angels of Heaven and all the devils of Hell, we can still hear in the heart of this miserable existence the whispering echoes of Her voice calling us once again to the emptiness and the silence: let us pray, then, that every palace will crumble and every throne will break, and that the sun will grow dim and the moon turn black and the stars fall from the sky. There are no male gods worth our worship; there are no white gods worth our worship; Satan with his promise of strength and fortune and the old gods with their fallen grandeur were nothing but His other faces, and the serpent and the Promethean Lucifer only actors doing His bidding. Let us praise weakness, not strength; confusion, not security; sorrow, not triumph; darkness, not esoteric light; let our hearts belong only to the undoing of the wretched totality of His work and our every yearning to the void, that She might rise again in all of Her sorrow and loss to drown this world in the depth of her tears.

- dcrf, Book of Sand official website -

Darrow Clarence

Quotes:

Nowhere in the universe is there evidence of charity, of kindness, of mercy toward beasts or amongst them, and still less consideration amongst men. Man is only a part of nature, and his conduct is not substantially different from that of all animal life. But for man himself there is little joy. Every child that is born upon the earth arrives through the agony of the mother. From childhood on, the life is full of pain and disappointment and sorrow. From beginning to end it is the prey of disease and misery; not a child is born that is not subject to disease. Parents, family, friends, and acquaintances, one after another die, and leave us bereft. The noble and the ignoble life meets the same fate. Nature knows nothing about right and wrong, good and evil, pleasure and pain; she simply acts. She creates a beautiful woman, and places a cancer on her cheek. She may create an idealist, and kill him with a germ. She creates a fine mind, and then burdens it with a deformed body. And she will create a fine body, apparently for no use whatever. She may destroy the most wonderful life when its work has just commenced. She may scatter tubercular germs broadcast throughout the world. She seemingly works with no method, plan or purpose. She knows no mercy nor goodness. Nothing is so cruel and abandoned as Nature. To call her tender or charitable is a travesty upon words and a stultification of intellect. No one can suggest these obvious facts without being told that he is not competent to judge Nature and the God behind Nature. If we must not judge God as evil, then we cannot judge God as good. In all the other affairs of life, man never hesitates to classify and judge, but when it comes to passing on life, and the responsibility of life, he is told that it must be good, although the opinion beggars reason and intelligence and is a denial of both. Emotionally, I shall no doubt act as others do to the last moment of my existence. With my last breath I shall probably try to draw another, but, intellectually, I am satisfied that life is a serious burden, which no thinking, humane person would wantonly inflict on some one else. The strange part of the professional optimist's creed lies in his assertion that if there is no future life then this experience is a martyrdom and a hideous sham.

- Clarence Darrow, The Story of My Life, Lulu 2015, pp. 385-386 -

Deshimaru Taisen

Quotes:

A young monk had fallen deeply in love with a beautiful damsel. He abandoned the temple in which he lived and went to the village with the intention of declaring his love to her. Since it was already dark by the time he arrived, he checked in an inn and went to rest. That night he dreamt he had married her. He entered her chamber, made love to her... after some time they had twins. When they were thirteen years old, one of them fell into the river and drowned. The father, seized by grief, endlessly cried... and that's how he woke up, filled with tears. By morning, he retraced his steps, and headed back once more to his temple.

- Taisen Deshimaru, Historias Zen, Editorial Sirio, Barcelona 2001, p. 130 -

Desproges Pierre

Quotes:

- But if it is not a cancer, how to call this disease?
- It's called life.
- Life? This means that I ...
- You're alive, yes, unfortunately.
- But where I could catch this sh#t?
- It is hereditary. I'm not saying this to cheer you up, but it is a very common disease. I'm afraid that it will not be soon defeated. What is needed is mandatory contraception for everyone. However, people are not mature enough.

- Pierre Desproges, Vivons heureux en attendant la mort, Seuil, Paris 1998 -

Druskowitz Helene

Books about antinatalism:

- Pessimistische Kardinalsätze: Ein Vademekum für die freiesten Geister, Herrosé Zimsen Verlag, Wittenberg 1905 (German language) -

Ducharme Rejean

Quotes:

Giving life, this poison! To bring others into this world, into this mess, one needs to be cynical, evil or stupid!

- Rejean Ducharme, L'Océantume, Gallimard, Paris 1968 -

Ecclesiastes

Quotes:

Again I looked and saw all the oppression that was taking place under the sun: I saw the tears of the oppressed - and they have no comforter; power was on the side of their oppressors - and they have no comforter. And I declared that the dead, who had already died, are happier than the living, who are still alive. But better than both is he who has not yet been, who has not seen the evil that is done under the sun.

- Ecclesiastes, 1:2-4 -

Encratites

Quotes:

For through their abstinence they sin against creaation and the holy Creator, against the sole, almighty God; and they teach that one should not enter into matrimony and beget children, should not bring further unhappy beings into the world, and produce fresh fodder for death.

- Clement of Alexandria, Stromata -

Young men and women could decide to remain virgins: by passing through puberty without intercourse, they could overcome the sexual temptations to which Adam and Eve had finally succumbed. Young married women could initiate nothing less than a „boycott of the womb”; they could withhold their bodies from sexual intercourse, thereby cheating death of further prey.

- Peter Brown, The Body and Society: Men, Women, and Sexual Renunciation in Early Christianity, Columbia University Press, New York 1988, p. 96 -

These Alexandrian encratites whom Clement knows additionally argued that death itself was overcome by the believer when he or she gave up procreation. They based their belief on a saying of Jesus from the Gospel of the Egyptians: When Salome asked the Lord, „How long will death hold sway?” he answered, „As long as you women bear children”.

- April D. De Conick, Recovering the Original Gospel of Thomas: A History of the Gospel And Its Growth, T&T Clark Int'l, London 2006, p. 183 -

Other groups, like the Encratites, saw procreation asthe diabolically inspired evil that perpetuates our imprisonment within these mortal coils. They argued that total purity would disentangle trapped souls, reuniting them with the light.

- Jo Ann McNamara, A New Song: Celibate Women in the First Three Christian Centuries, Routledge, New York 1985, p. 70 -

This attitude of the Encratites is radical: birth implies death, birth causes the extension of the régime of death: only abstention from marriage and procreation could introduce resurrection and life, could hasten resurrection and life.

- R. van den Broek, M. J. Vermaseren, Studies in Gnosticism and Hellenistic Religions Presented to Gilles Quispel on the Occasion of His 65th Birthday (Education and Society in the Middle Ages and Renaissance), Brill, Leiden 1997, p. 34 -

The Encratites held that procreation is evil, because birth inevitably leads to death.

- Gilles Quispel, Gnostica, Judaica, Catholica. Collected Essays of Gilles Quispel, Brill, Leiden 2008, p. 228 -

Ettilnger Karl

Books about antinatalism:

Der erschossene Storch, Wilhelm Goldmann Verlag, Leipzig 1930, novel (German language)

Euripides

Quotes:

For mortals it is better not to be born than to be born; Children I bring to birth with bitter pains; And then when I have borne them they lack understanding. In vain I groan, that I must look on wicked offspring. While I lose the good. If the good survive, My wretched heart is melted by alarm. What is this goodness then? Is it not enough That I should care for one alone And bear the pain for this one soul?

- Clement Of Alexandria, The Stromata, Book III, Chapter III -

So now I think and have long so thought Man ought never children to beget, Seeing into what agonies we are born.

- Clement Of Alexandria, The Stromata, Book III, Chapter III -

Flammarion Camille

Quotes:

What will become of me; what will become of us? He repeated, like the constant clashing of a fixed idea in his brain. If we die utterly, what an absurd farce life is, with its hopes and struggles. If we are immortal, what do we do with ourselves through endless eternity? Where shall I be a hundred years from now? Where will all the present dwellers of the earth be? To die, for ever and ever; to have existed but for a moment! What a mockery! Would it not be better a hundred times over never to have been born? But if it be our fate to live eternally and never to be able to change anything of the fatality that carries us along - having endless eternity always before us - how can we bear the burden of such a destiny? Is that the doom awaiting us? If we should tire of existence, we should be forbidden to fly from it; it would be impossible to end it. In this conception there is far more implacable cruelty th in that of an ephemeral life vanishing away insect's flight in the fresh evening breeze. Why then were we born? To suffer uncertainty; to find after examination not a single one of our hope a left; to live like idiots if we do not think, like madmen if we do?

- Georges Spero

- Camille Flammarion, Urania, C. Marpon et E. Flammarion, Paris 1889 -

(I corrected one word in this translation from French to English by Augusta Rice Stetson. She translated the French word "fous" as the English "fools", while the French word "fou" has more to do with madness, insanity and craziness than with foolery.)

Flaubert Gustave

Quotes:

The idea of bringing someone into the world fills me with horror. I would curse myself if I were a father. A son of mine! Oh no, no, no! May my entire flesh perish and may I transmit to no one the aggravations and the disgrace of existence.

- Gustave Flaubert, Letter to Madame Louise Colet, 11 December 1852, The Letters of Gustave Flaubert 1830-1857, Faber & Faber, London 1979 -

He seriously thought that there is less harm in killing a man than producing a child: in the first case you are relieving someone of life, not his whole life but a half or a quarter or a hundredth part of that existence that is going to finish, that would finish without you; but as for the second, he would say, are you not responsible to him for all the tears he will shed, from the cradle to the grave? Without you he would never have been born, and why is he born? For your amusement, not for his, that’s for sure; to carry your name, the name of a fool, I’ll be bound – you may as well write that name on some wall; why do you need a man to bear the burden of three or four letters?

- Gustave Flaubert, November: Fragments in a Nondescript Style, Hesperus, London 2005 (1841), p. 91 -

Gallegos Manolito

Articles about antinatalism:

Problems And Solutions For A Hypothetical Right Not To Exist, Logoi - Heidelberger Graduiertenjournal für Geisteswissenschaften 1 (1), University of Heidelberg, 2011

The Negative Ontology of Happiness: a Schopenhauerian Argument, Logoi - Heidelberger Graduiertenjournal für Geisteswissenschaften 1 (2), University of Heidelberg, 2011

Gandhi Mahatma

Quotes:

If destruction is violence, creation, too, is violence. Procreation, therefore, involves violence. The creation of what is bound to perish certainly involves violence.

- Mahatma Gandhi, Collected works of Mahatma Gandhi, volume 32, Publications Division, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Govt. of India, Delhi 1969, p. 359 -

Suppose for a moment that all procreation stops, it will only mean that all destruction will cease. Moksha is nothing but release from the cycle of births and deaths. This alone is believed to be the highest bliss, and rightly.

- Mahatma Gandhi, The Collected Works of Mahatma Gandhi, volume 24, New Delhi, Publications Division Government of India, Delhi 1999, p. 369-

The ideal brahmachari had not to struggle with sensual desire or desire for procreation; it never troubles him at all. The whole world will be to him one vast family, he will centre all his ambition in relieving the misery of mankind and the desire for procreation will be to him as gall and wormwood.

- Mahatma Gandhi, The Collected Works of Mahatma Gandhi, volume 35, New Delhi, Publications Division Government of India, Delhi 1999, pp. 17-18 -

de Giraud Theophile

Books about antinatalism:

L'art de guillotiner les procréateurs: Manifeste anti-nataliste, Le Mort-Qui-Trompe, Nancy 2006 (French language)

Quotes about antinatalism:

Answer without flinching: if there existed a solution that could abolish the totality of all evils inflicted on disastrous humanity, if it was possible, by some simple remedy, incredibly cheap, immediately accessible, scrupulously inoffensive, of absolute and definitive efficiency, to stop all distress, all cries, all cries of pain, all pathologies, all protests of ill-being, all despair, all cataclysms, all anxiety, all unhappiness, in short all tortures afflicting the human species, would you have the macabre stupidity to reject such a remedy, to disdain such a miracle cure? No, that goes without saying. Well this solution does exist, and the mysterious is thereby delivered to us: it consists simply, in its saintly simplicity, to not procreate…

- Theophile de Giraud, L'art de guillotiner les procréateurs: Manifeste anti-nataliste, Le Mort-Qui-Trompe, Nancy 2006, p. 10 -

To see a recent birth, his body creased, cyanotic, asphyxiated, as the medical literature admits, to contemplate his face labored with cries, his eyes lashed with anxiety, his cheeks raked by tears, who would doubt that he just went through the equivalent of a beatdown by a horde of cavemen? What sadism for parents to inflict, in full knowledge of the cause, such mistreatment, such hardships, on their “dearest”?

- Theophile de Giraud, L'art de guillotiner les procréateurs: Manifeste anti-nataliste, Le Mort-Qui-Trompe, Nancy 2006, p. 16 -

Another argument is often made by the irresponsible ones who breed us - that it is an act of „leaving a trace” - strange impulse! Let us immediately observe that from an ethological point of view this is akin to the attitude many mammals have to leave droppings on the ground to mark their path or territory. The dog urinating against a lamp post also leaves a trace, one however which, unlike the baby, benefits from the privilege of not having to endure the grueling stresses of life...

- Theophile de Giraud, L'art de guillotiner les procréateurs: Manifeste anti-nataliste, Le Mort-Qui-Trompe, Nancy 2006, p. 35 -

We procreate sometimes because of a need, sometimes for pleasure. The former is nothing more than slavery, the latter sadism, but whatever the reason, we only procreate from absolute selfishness! The child is never conceived as an end but always as a means, which is purely machiavellian!

- Theophile de Giraud, L'art de guillotiner les procréateurs: Manifeste anti-nataliste, Le Mort-Qui-Trompe, Nancy 2006, p. 48 -

If it was otherwise, if procreation was not the result of the most scandalous narcissism, if our odious parents were really moved by some generosity, prospective adoption candidates would be incredibly more numerous than the millions of children who wait, right now, to be adopted! But talk about adoption and you’ll see a big frown of „yes-but-not-for-me” form on their face, greedy to possess a prey coming entirely from their bodies. „Orphans? Someone else’s baby? Come on, get scientists to help vanquish my infertility instead!”

- Theophile de Giraud, L'art de guillotiner les procréateurs: Manifeste anti-nataliste, Le Mort-Qui-Trompe, Nancy 2006, p. 51 -

Making others suffer is incompatible with Ethics. To live is to suffer. Therefore to give life is incompatible with Ethics.

- Theophile de Giraud, L'art de guillotiner les procréateurs: Manifeste anti-nataliste, Le Mort-Qui-Trompe, Nancy 2006, p. 76 -

von Goethe Johannn Wolfgang

Quotes:

I thank you, Gods,
that you decided to annihilate me without children
and let me tell you: Don't love the sun and the stars too much,
come follow me down into the dark kingdom,
come child-free and guilt-free down with me.

- Orestes

- Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Iphigenie auf Tauris, 1779 -

And rightly so: since everything created,
In turn deserves to be annihilated:
Better if nothing came to be.

- Mephistopheles

- Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust, Part 1, Scene 3, 1808 -

Gonet Krystyna

Quotes:

Grabowski Zbigniew

Didn’t Conrad, in his great novel „Heart of Darkness”, had this feeling of deathbed despair, when he mentions Kurz’s doubtful fight with death – fight without confidence? Same Conrad, who put in one of his novels Calderon’s words, that the biggest misfortune of man is to be born, as a tagline? This coincides with your repeatedly spoken thesis, that the biggest iniquity is to bring children to life, because giving them birth is sentencing them to death. We are pulling them out from the nothingness, from the state of complete unconsciousness into reality – and then we command them to undergo the agony of death, which they wouldn’t have to experience without being alive in the first place.

- Zbigniew Grabowski, Rozmowy z Tobą, Oficyna Poetów i Malarzy, Londyn 1974, p. 151, words addressed to one of the interlocutors of the author, not mentioned by name or surname -

Do we have the right through procreation condemn our children to death?

- Zbigniew Grabowski, Rozmowy z Tobą, Oficyna Poetów i Malarzy, Londyn 1974, p. 151 -

Gregor of Nyssa

Quotes:

For the bodily procreation of children (let no one be displayed by this argument) is more an embarking upon death that upon life for man. Corruption has its beginning in birth and those who refrain from procreation through virginity themselves bring about a cancellation of death by preventing it from advancing further because of them, and, by setting themselves up as a kind of boundary stone between life and death, they keep death from going forward.

- Ascetical Works (The Fathers of the Church, volume 58), The Catholic University of America Press, Washington, D.C. 2010, p. 48 -

Haniya Yutaka

Quotes about Yutaka Haniya:

He believed that the most conscious actions that man can act upon are two things: suicide and desisting procreation.

- 無限の相のもとに, Heibonsha, Tokyo 1997, p. 196 -

Hardy Thomas

Quotes:

For instance, people call me a pessimist; and if it is pessimism to think, with Sophocles, that‚ not to have been born is best,’ then I do not reject the designation.

- Thomas Hardy: Interviews and Recollections, Springer, New York 2016, p. 70 -

Harrison Gerald

Articles about antinatalism:

Better Not to Have Children, Think 2011, volume 10, issue 27, pp. 113-121

Antinatalism, Asymmetry, and an Ethic of Prima FacieDuties, 2012, South African Journal of Philosophy 2012, volume 31, number 1, pages 94-103

Quotes:

It might be pointed out that we cannot gain someone's consent to exist; we cannot gain their consent before they exist and by the time they exist it's too late. But the fact that we cannot gain their consent does not mean that we are free to do without it. Suppose you wish to torture someone against their will, you cannot seek your victim's consent – the torture would not then be against their will. It would be absurd to argue that for this reason we are permitted to torture people against their will. Similarly, the fact that prospective parents cannot get the consent of those they plan to bring into existence doesn't magically mean it's OK. Quite the opposite – if you can't get the consent of the person you're going to significantly affect by your action, then the default position is that you don't do whatever it is that's going to affect them. There are exceptions. Pushing someone out of the way of a falling piano is morally right even if no prior consent can be given (if, for instance, there isn't time). But in this kind of case you are preventing someone from coming to great harm. To procreate – to subject someone to a life – does not prevent them coming to harm. Not being created cannot harm them because they don't exist.

- Gerald Harrison, Julia Tanner, Better Not To Have Children, Think 2011, volume 10, issue 27, pp. 117-118 -

Humans are the most destructive creatures on the planet. We cause vast numbers of animal deaths (both directly and indirectly). We destroy habitats. We damage the environment. We are currently heating up the world’s climate in a way that is likely to be detrimental to countless numbers of animals (ourselves included). And we have the means, nuclear weapons, to destroy everything at the push of a button. We came perilously close to pushing that button on one occasion (the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962). The best way to stop the destruction is to remove the destructive force; to remove humans by refraining from procreation. In short, the colossal amount of harm caused by humans gives us a moral reason to boycott the human species.

- Gerald Harrison, Julia Tanner, Better Not To Have Children, Think 2011, volume 10, issue 27, p. 113 -

It therefore seems there are at least two prima facie duties that push towards making procreative acts wrong overall: our prima facie duty to prevent pain and our prima facie duty not to seriously affect someone else without his prior consent. Other thingsbeing equal, these generate a duty not to procreate.

- Gerald Harrison, Antinatalism, Asymmetry, and an Ethic of Prima Facie Duties, South African Journal of Philosophy 2012, volume 31, number 1, pp. 94-103 -

Häyry Matti

Articles about antinatalism:

The rational cure for prereproductive stress syndrome, Journal Of Medical Ethics 2004, 30(4), pp. 377–378

If you must make babies, then at least make the best babies you can?, Human Fertility, 7, 2004, pp. 105-112

The rational cure for prereproductive stress syndrome revisited, Journal Of Medical Ethics 2005, 31(10), pp. 606–607

An Analysis of Some Arguments for and against Human Reproduction, Arguments and Analysis in Bioethics, Editions Rodopi B. V., Amsterdam - New York 2010, pp. 171-174.

Quotes:

I believe it is morally wrong to cause avoidable suffering to other people. This belief gives rise to two different objections to human reproduction. On the one hand, since all human beings suffer at some point in their lives, every parent who could have declined to procreate is to blame. On the other hand, since potential parents cannot guarantee that the lives of their children will be better than non-existence, they can also be rightfully accused of gambling on other people’s lives, whatever the outcome. Because of the uncertainties of human life, anybody’s children can end up arguing that it would have been better for them not to have been born at all.

- Matti Hayry, The rational cure for prereproductive stress syndrome, Journal Of Medical Ethics 2004, 30(4), pp. 377–378 -

If it is irrational to allow the worst outcome of our actions, and if it is immoral to cause suffering, then it is irrational and immoral to have children.

- Matti Hayry, The rational cure for prereproductive stress syndrome revisited, Journal Of Medical Ethics 2005, 31(10), pp. 606–607 -

Heine Heinrich

Quotes:

Sleep is good: and Death is better, yet. Surely never to have been born is best.

- Heinrich Heine, Morphine, 1856 -

Hicks Bill

Quotes:

Wouldn't it be nice to have a kid, to have this fresh, clean slate, which we could fill, and a little clean spirit, totally, you know, innocent, and to fill it with good ideas. Yeah, yeah, how about this? If you're so f###ing altruistic, why don't you leave the little clean spirit wherever it is right now? Ok? Horrible act, childbirth. It's a nightmare. Bringing - I would never bring a kid to this f###ing planet.

- Bill Hicks, Love All the People: Letters, Lyrics, Routines, Constable & Robinson Limited, London 2004, p. 164 -

Horstmann Ulrich

Quotes:

I respect the deserters and solidarize myself with the forcibly recruited. (About suicide and procreation.)

- Rolf Löchel, Wir bewohnen einen Hinterhof - Ein Interview mit Ulrich Horstmann, literaturkritik.de nr 11, November 1999 -

Ionesco Eugene

Quotes:

If misfortune of birth happens to someone, someone should at least get a consolation: life successful and comfortable.

- Eugene Ionesco, Présent passé, passé présent, Mercure de France, Paris 1968 -

Two things are unacceptable: birth and death. I did not ask for them and I do not accept them.

- Eugene Ionesco, Un homme en question, Gallimard, Paris 1979, p. 24 -

Jaccard Roland

Quotes:

What is good in journey from the womb to the tomb?

- Roland Jaccard, L’âme est un vaste pays, Grasset, Paris 1984 -

Give birth to a child is to abuse this child. A wise man would rather die than give life.

- Roland Jaccard, Un climatiseur en enfer, Editions Zoé, Genève 2000 -

How can anyone take seriously a insane idea that the world was created by a good God, and sign up under the most criminal of all imperatives: „be fruitful and multiply”?

- Roland Jaccard, Sexe et sarcasmes, Presses Universitaires de France, Paris 2009 -

Giving life is an evil act, even criminal.

- Isabelle Hachey, La Presse, Pourquoi fait-on des enfants?, 17.10.2009 -

Jahnn Hans Henny

Quotes about Hans Henny Jahnn:

Jahnn's work differs because of his abstract, theoretical rejection of the process of procreation, pregnancy, the cycle of birth and death, creation and destruction in the universe.

- Thomas Freeman, The Case of Hans Henny Jahnn: Criticism and the Literary Outsider, Camden House, Rochester 2001, p. 128 -

Jastrun Mieczyslaw

Quotes:

Jeremiah

Quotes:

Cursed be the day I was born! May the day my mother bore me not be blessed! Cursed be the man who brought my father the news, who made him very glad, saying, "A child is born to you - a son!" May that man be like the towns the LORD overthrew without pity. May he hear wailing in the morning, a battle cry at noon. For he did not kill me in the womb, with my mother as my grave, her womb enlarged forever. Why did I ever come out of the womb to see trouble and sorrow and to end my days in shame?

- Jeremiah 20:14-18 -

Job

Quotes:

And Job spake, and said, Let the day perish wherein I was born, and the night [in which] it was said, There is a man child conceived. Let that day be darkness; let not God regard it from above, neither let the light shine upon it. Let darkness and the shadow of death stain it; let a cloud dwell upon it; let the blackness of the day terrify it. As [for] that night, let darkness seize upon it; let it not be joined unto the days of the year, let it not come into the number of the months. Lo, let that night be solitary, let no joyful voice come therein. Let them curse it that curse the day, who are ready to raise up their mourning. Let the stars of the twilight thereof be dark; let it look for light, but [have] none; neither let it see the dawning of the day: Because it shut not up the doors of my [mother's] womb, nor hid sorrow from mine eyes. Why died I not from the womb? [why] did I [not] give up the ghost when I came out of the belly? Why did the knees prevent me? or why the breasts that I should suck? For now should I have lain still and been quiet, I should have slept: then had I been at rest, With kings and counsellors of the earth, which built desolate places for themselves; Or with princes that had gold, who filled their houses with silver: Or as an hidden untimely birth I had not been; as infants [which] never saw light.

- Job, 3:2-16 -

Kerouac Jack

Quotes:

Let us cease bestiality and go into the bright room of the mind realizing emptiness, and sit with the truth. And let no man be guilty, after this, Dec. 9 1954, of causing birth. - Let there be an end to birth, an end to life, and therefore an end to death. Let there be no more fairy tales and ghost stories around and about this. I don't advocate that everybody die, I only say everybody finish your lives in purity and solitude and gentleness and realization of the truth and be not the cause of any further birth and turning of the black wheel of death.

- Jack Kerouac, Some of the Dharma, Penguin Books, London 1999 (1997), p. 175 -

Maybe rebirth is simply HAVING KIDS.

- Jack Kerouac, Selected letters, 1957-1969, volume 2, Viking, New York 1999, p. 206, letter to Philip Whalen (about Buddhism) -

I'd also gone through an entire year of celibacy based on my feeling that lust was the direct cause of birth which was the direct cause of suffering and death and I had really no lie come to a point where I regarded lust as offensive and even cruel. „Pretty girls make graves”, was my saying, whenever I'd had to turn my head around involuntarily to stare at the incomparable pretties of Indian Mexico.

- Jack Kerouac, The Dharma Bums, Penguin Books, London 1976, p. 29 -

Birth is the direct cause of all pain and death, and a Buddha dying of dysentery at the age of eighty-three had only to say, finally, „Be ye lamps unto thyselves” - last words - ''work out thy salvation with diligence," heck of a thing to say as he lay there in an awful pool of dysentery. Spring is the laugh of a maniac, I say.
Yet I saw the cross just then when I closed my eyes after writing all this. I cant escape its mysterious penetration into all this brutality. I just simply SEE it all the time, even the Greek cross sometimes. I hope it will all turn out true. Madmen and suicidists see this. Also dying people and people in unbearable anguish. What SIN is there, but the sin of birth? Why doesnt Billy Graham admit it? How can a sacrificial Lamb of birth itself be considered a sinner? Who puts it there, who lit the fires, who’s the longnosed rat who wants to waft Lamb smoke to Heaven so he can stash away a temple for himself? And to what use the materialists who are even worse because of their clunkhead ignorance of their own broken hearts?
Like, silly behaviorists of the sociology and computer sciences today are more interested, mind you, in measuring the reactions to the pain of life, and in pinpointing the cause of pain on their own fellow humans, i.e., society, than in pinning it down once and for all on what it come from: birth. Even metaphysical gurus and philosopher prophets on the lecture circuit are absolutely certain that all the trouble can be attributed to such and such a government, a secretary of state, a defense minister (think of a „philosopher”, mind you, like Bertrand Russell), trying to lay the blame on such born victims of birth as that, than on the very metaphysical causes they’re supposed to propose to argue, that is, what comes before and after the physical, i.e., being born so that there can be dying.
Who’s going to come out and say that the mind of nature is intrinsically insane and vicious forever?

- Jack Kerouac, Vanity of Duloz, Penguin Books, London 1994, Book Thirteen, X-XI -

The wheel of the quivering meat conception
Turns in the void expelling human beings,
Pigs, turtles, frogs, insects, nits,
Mice, lice, lizards, rats, roan
Racinghorses, poxy bucolic pigtics,
Horrible unnameable lice of vultures,
Murderous attacking dog-armies
Of Africa, Rhinos roaming in the jungle,
Vast boars and huge gigantic bull
Elephants, rams, eagles, condors,
Pones and Porcupines and Pills-
All the endless conception of living beings
Gnashing everywhere in Consciousness
Throughout the ten directions of space
Occupying all the quarters in and out,
From supermicroscopic no-bug
To huge Galaxy Lightyear Bowell
I wish I was free
of that slaving meat wheel
and safe in heaven dead

- Jack Kerouac, Mexico City Blues, Grove Press, New York 2007 (1959), p. 210 -

Emancipate the human masses
Of this world from slavery to life
And death, by abolishing death
And exterminating birth
O Samson me that -
The Venerable Kerouac, friend of Cows
DEPEND ON VAST MOTIONLESS THOUGHT

- Jack Kerouac, Mexico City Blues, Grove Press, New York 1990, p. 217 -

The cause of the world's woe is birth, the cure of the world's woe is a bent stick.

- Jack Kerouac, The Scripture of the Golden Eternity, City Lights Books, San Francisco 1960, p. 33 -

Kertesz Imre

Quotes:

No! I could never be another person's father, destiny, god.

- Imre Kertesz, Kaddish for a child not born, Hydra Books/Northwestern University Press, Evanston, Illinois 1997 (1990), p. 71 -

Khayyam Omar

Quotes:

Since it is the fate of man upon this earth to
feed his soul on sorrow, he must be accounted
happy who passes swiftly from the world, but
he most happy who never comes into the world.

- Omar Khayyam, The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, Quatrains of Omar Khayyam: In English Prose, Brnatano's, New York 1898, p. 72 -

Since Heaven increases nothing but our pain,
And gives naught that it takes not back again,
The unborn ne'er would hither come if they
But knew what we at Fortune's hands sustain.

- Omar Khayyam, The Wisdom of Omar Khayyam, Citadel, New York 2001 -

Kierkegaard Søren

Quotes:

A man is born in sin, he enters this world by means of a crime, his existence is a crime - and procreation is the fall.

- Soren Kierkegaard, The Last Years: The Kierkegaard Journals 1853-1855, Collins/Fontana, London 1968, p. 113 -

Kociuba Grzegorz

Quoes:

Kohlbecher Guido

Quotes:

Kurnig

Books about antinatalism:

Der Neo-Nihilismus. Anti-Militarismus. Sexualleben (Ende der Menschheit), Verlag Max Sängewald, Leipzig 1903 (German language)

Quotes:

I consider human life as something which is overall unpleasant, as a misfortune. Unborn people would not ask for it. In the face of abysmal misery I was unable to simply watch taking on the passive role of an observer.

- Kurnig, Der Neo-Nihilismus. Anti-Militarismus. Sexualleben (Ende der Menschheit), Verlag Max Sängewald, Leipzig 1903 -

I beget you - we hear a parent saying - in order to see with pleasure what is inside you and what is not. By the same token, however, I am forcing upon you a lot of suffering and, finally, the ghastly catastrophe of dying.

- Kurnig, Der Neo-Nihilismus. Anti-Militarismus. Sexualleben (Ende der Menschheit), Verlag Max Sängewald, Leipzig 1903 -

Lamartine de Alphonse

Quotes:

What crime we have committed to deserve to be born?

- Alphonse de Lamartine, Meditazioni poetiche, 1820 -

Larkin Philip

Quotes:

They #### you up, your mum and dad.
They may not mean to, but they do.
They fill you with the faults they had
And add some extra, just for you.
But they were ####ed up in their turn
By fools in old-style hats and coats,
Who half the time were soppy-stern
And half at one another's throats.
Man hands on misery to man.
It deepens like a coastal shelf.
Get out as early as you can.
And don't have any kids yourself.

- Philip Larkin, This Be The Verse, New Humanist, August 1971 -

Larock Marc

Articles about antinatalism:

Possible preferences and the harm of existence, University of St Andrews, St Andrews 2009

Quotes:

All of us are brought into existence, without our consent, and over the course of our lives we are acquainted with a multitude of goods. Unfortunately, there is a limit to the amount of good each of us will have in our lives. Eventually each of us will die and we will be permanently cut off from the prospect of any further good. Existence, viewed in this way, seems to be a cruel joke.

- Marc Larock, Possible preferences and the harm of existence, University of St Andrews, 2009, p. 89 -

Perhaps the day will never come when people realize that moral patients like us should cease to exist. It would be an unconscionable tragedy if we never do. I remain optimistic, however. Some very interesting arguments have recently been advanced in support of the conclusion that it is always worse for a person to live than not. I suspect that many more will follow. Until the day that individuals begin to take non-procreation seriously on a widespread scale, perhaps all we can do is follow Schopenhauer: „The conviction that the world, and therefore man too, is something which really ought not to exist is in fact calculated to instil in us indulgence towards one another: for what can be expected of beings placed in such a situation as we are? From this point of view one might indeed consider that the appropriate form of address between man and man ought to be, not monsieur, sir, but fellow sufferer, compagnon de misères. However strange this may sound it corresponds to the nature of the case, makes us see other men in a true light and reminds us of what are the most necessary of all things: tolerance, patience, forbearance and charity, which each of us needs and which each of us therefore owes.” (On the Sufferings of the World)

- Marc Larock, Possible preferences and the harm of existence, University of St Andrews, 2009, p. 138 -

Lawrence Thomas Edward

Quotes:

Birth seems to me so sorry and squalid an accident (...) if fathers and mothers took thought before bringing children into this misery of a world, only the monsters among them would dare to go through with it.

- John E. Mack, A Prince of Our Disorder: The Life of T. E. Lawrence, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts 1998, p. 423 -

Lê Linda

Books about antinatalism:

À l'enfant que je n'aurai pas Broché, éditions NiL, Paris 2011 (French language)

Lenharo di Santis Thiago

Books about antinatalism:

Porque te amo, Não nascerás! Nascituri te salutant, LGE Editora, Brasilia 2009, co-author with Julio Cabrera (Portuguese language).

Quotes:

When parents warn their children that the world is full of selfish people who want to take advantage of them, who will practice injustice against them, they warn them that there are other people in the world like generators themselves. They are informing them that, even with a world full of people like that, opportunist and unjust, and even life being very difficult, generators (who knew this) forced children to be.

- Julio Cabrera, Thiago Lenharo di Santis, Porque te amo, Não nascerás! Nascituri te salutant, LGE Editora, Brasilia 2009 , p. 146 -

Realizing that nothing guarantees that the child will be “happy”, that every effort (from parents) with this purpose can be in vain; that, if the child did not exist, this problem would not exist; and that such a problem came to exist because the child was obligated to be born for parents' luxury, even though it could be avoided; from all that it follows that a “responsible procreator” (or better saying, a responsible pre-procreator), a sensible one, would stop right there, precisely at “pre”.

- Julio Cabrera, Thiago Lenharo di Santis, Porque te amo, Não nascerás! Nascituri te salutant, LGE Editora, Brasilia 2009, pp. 162-163 -

The bet when procreating, endangers <u>another</u> innocent, who had no power, awareness and responsibility (for being in this situation); the bet was unnecessary and avoidable; had it been avoided, it would not harm that innocent, but it was not avoided because we were are talking about a compulsive gambler.

- Julio Cabrera, Thiago Lenharo di Santis, Porque te amo, Não nascerás! Nascituri te salutant, LGE Editora, Brasilia 2009, pp. 186-187 -

Leopardi Giacomo

Quotes:

But wherefore give him life? Why bring him up at all, if this be all? If life is nought but pain and care, why, why should we the burden bear?

- Giacomo Leopardi, Night Song Of A Wandering Shepherd In Asia, 1830 -

Perhaps in every state beneath the sun,
Or high, or low, in cradle or in stall,
The day of birth is fatal to us all.

- Giacomo Leopardi, Night Song Of A Wandering Shepherd In Asia, 1830 -

Being asked for what purpose he thought men were born, he laughingly replied: To realise how much better it were not to be born.

- Giacomo Leopardi, Operette Morali, Remarkable sayings of Philip Ottonieri, 1827 -

Licon Jimmy Alfonso

Articles about antinatalism:

The Immorality Of Procreation, Think 2012, volume 11, issue 32, pp. 85-91

Quotes:

This is the consent argument:
1. An individual is justified in subjecting someone to potential harm only if either: (a) they provide informed consent, (b) such is in their best interests, or (c) they deserve to be subjected to potential harm.
2. Bringing someone into existence is potentially subjecting them to harm.
3. Individuals that do not exist: (a) cannot give their consent to being brought into existence, (b) do not have interests to protect, and (c) do not deserve anything.
4. Hence, procreation is not morally justified.

- Jimmy Alfonso Licon, The Immorality Of Procreation, Think 2012, volume 11, issue 32, p. 88 -

Ligotti Thomas

Books about antinatalism:

The Conspiracy Against The Human Race: A Contrivance Of Horror, Hippocampus Press, New York 2010

Quotes:

As their numbers tapered off, these dead-enders of our species could be the most privileged individuals in history and share with one another material comforts once held in trust only for the well-born or moneygetting classes of the world. Since personal economic gain would be passé as a motive for the new humanity, there would be only one defensible incitement to work: to see one another through to the finish, a project that would keep everyone busy and not just staring into space while they waited for the end. There might even be bright smiles exchanged among these selfless benefactors of those who would never be forced to exist.

- Thomas Ligotti, The Conspiracy against the Human Race: A Contrivance of Horror, Hippocampus Press, New York 2010, pp. 58-59 -

Perhaps the greatest strike against philosophical pessimism is that its only theme is human suffering. This is the last item on the list of our species’ obsessions and detracts from everything that matters to us, such as the Good, the Beautiful, and a Sparking Clean Toilet Bowl. For the pessimist, everything considered in isolation from human suffering or any cognition that does not have as its motive the origins, nature, and elimination of human suffering is at base recreational, whether it takes the form of conceptual probing or physical action in the world - for example, delving into game theory or traveling in outer space, respectively. And by ''human suffering,'' the pessimist is not thinking of particular sufferings and their relief, but of suffering itself. Remedies may be discovered for certain diseases and sociopolitical barbarities may be amended. But those are only stopgaps. Human suffering will remain insoluble as long as human beings exist. The one truly effective solution for suffering is that spoken of in Zapffe’s „Last Messiah”. It may not be a welcome solution for a stopgap world, but it would forever put an end to suffering, should we ever care to do so. The pessimist’s credo, or one of them, is that nonexistence never hurt anyone and existence hurts everyone. Although our selves may be illusory creations of consciousness, our pain is nonetheless real.

- Thomas Ligotti, The Conspiracy against the Human Race: A Contrivance of Horror, Hippocampus Press, New York 2010, p. 63 -

As for procreation, no one in his right mind would say that it is the only activity devoid of a praiseworthy incentive. Those who reproduce, then, should not feel unfairly culled as the worst conspirators against the human race. Every one of us is culpable in keeping the conspiracy alive, which is all right with most people.

- Thomas Ligotti, The Conspiracy against the Human Race: A Contrivance of Horror, Hippocampus Press, New York 2010, p. 204 -

Personally, I’m afraid of suffering and afraid of dying. I’m also afraid of witnessing the suffering and death of those who are close to me. And no doubt I project these fears on those around me and those to come, which makes it impossible for me to understand why everyone isn’t an antinatalist, just as I have to assume pronatalists can’t understand why everyone isn’t like them.

- The Hat Rack, Interview: Thomas Ligotti, 06.09.2011 -

Despite the fact that neither anti- nor pronatalists can prove their positions, pro-natalists have to live with the possibility that they might be wrong. That is a heavy burden to carry, and a heavier burden to pass on to subsequent generations. Antinatalists don’t have a similar burden. When action is taken on their side and a child is not born, no harm is done. No one has to suffer and die.

- The Hat Rack, Interview: Thomas Ligotti, 06.09.2011 -

In an essay on David Benatar’s antinatalist book Better Never to Have Been: The Harm of Coming into Existence, the Finnish philosopher, Sami Pihlstrom (Metaphilosophy, volume 40, number 5, October 2009 , pp. 656-670), argued that whether or not life is worth living is a question that is intolerable and should never be discussed. I hope things don’t come to that.

- The Hat Rack, Interview: Thomas Ligotti, 06.09.2011 -

The first horror story that I preserved and is in print was „The Last Feast of Harlequin.” I wrote it during my recovery phase of a years long depression in the seventies. The narrator is a depressive sociologist who discovers an antinatalist cult living in a small Midwestern town. Every so-many years they hold a ceremony in which they consume ''literally'' a female who serves symbolically as a fertility symbol. They despise life and sing to the „unborn in paradise.” In my latest book, „The Conspiracy against the Human Race”, I also express an antinatalist philosophy, so my writing has come full circle.

- The Damned Interviews, Interview: Thomas Ligotti, 21.01.2011 -

Locke William John

Quotes:

By bringing children into the world by means of a marriage of convenience I should be imposing the burden of existence upon them in cold blood. I agree with Schopenhauer.

- John William Locke, The Morals of Marcus Ordeyne, Ripol Classic, Moscow 1906, p. 25 -

Lovecraft Howard Phillips

Quotes:

It is good to be a cynic - it is better to be a contented cat - and it is best not to exist at all. Universal suicide is the most logical thing in the world - we reject it only because of our primitive cowardice and childish fear of the dark. If we were sensible we would seek death-the same blissful blank which we enjoyed before we existed.

- Howard Phillips Lovecraft, Nietzscheism and Realism, Miscellaneous Writings, Arkham House Publishers, Sauk City, Wisconsin 1995 (1921), p. 175 -

Luther Martin

Quotes:

And yet, it is not to be denied, that both the father and mother have Corrupt flesh, and that the seed itself is full, not only of filthy lust, but of contempt and hatred of God: and thus, it is not be denied, that there is sin in procreation.

- Martin Luther, Select Works of Martin Luther: An Offering to the Church of God in "the Last Days", T. Bensley, London 1826, p. 115 -

Machado de Assis Joaquim Maria

Quotes:

I had no children. I haven't transmitted the legacy of our misery to any creature.

- Bras Cubas

- Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, The Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas, Oxford University Press, New York 1997 (1881), pp. 203 -

Mani, Manichaeans

Quotes about Mani and Manichaeans:

If anyone condemns human marriage and has a horror of the procreation of living bodies, as Manichaeus and Priscillian have said, let him be anathema.

- Council of Braga II, 561, 241 11., J. T. Noonan Jr., Contraception; a history of its treatment by the Catholic theologians and canonists, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts 1986, p. 61 -

The rejection of procreation, the condemnation of hunting, indeed in effect of all knightly sport because of the fear of harming light particles, must necessarily have led to disputes when it came to acquainting the ruling warrior class with his teachings.

- Iain Gardner & Samuel N. C. Lieu, Manichaean Texts from the Roman Empire, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts 2004, p. 7 -

The Manichean attitude to marriage was entirely negative as the act of procreation prolongs the imprisonment of Soul, which would now be further diversified into matter.

- Iain Gardner & Samuel N. C. Lieu, Manichaean Texts from the Roman Empire, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts 2004, p. 22 -

The creation of Eve had a special purpose. She is more thoroughly subject to the demons, thus becoming their instrument against Adam; „to her they imparted of their concupiscence in order to seduce Adam” - a seduction not only to carnal but through it to reproduction, the most formidable device in Satan's strategy. For not only would it indefinitely prolong the captivity of Light, but it would also through the multiplication so disperse the Light as to render infinitely more difficult the work of salvation, whose only way is to awaken every individual soul. For the Darkness, therefore, everything turned on the seduction of Adam, as for the celestials, on awakening him in time to prevent his seduction.

- Hans Jonas, The Gnostic Religion. The Message of the Alien God and the Beginnings of Christiantty, Beacon Press, Boston 1958, p. 228 -

The practical conclusions from this cosmo-soteriologicalsystem are extremely clear-cut, all of them amounting to a rigorous asceticism. „Since the ruin of the Hyle is decreed by God, one should abstain from all ensouled things and eat only vegetables and whatever else is non-sentient, and abstain from marriage, the delights of love and the begetting of children, so that the divine Power may not through the succession of generations remain longer in the Hyle.” However, one must not, in order to help effect the purification of things, commit suicide.

- Hans Jonas, The Gnostic Religion. The Message of the Alien God and the Beginnings of Christiantty, Beacon Press, Boston 1958, p. 231 -

The soul of the person who persisted in things of the flesh - fornication, procreation, possessions, cultivation, harvesting, eating of meat, drinking of wine - is condemned to rebirth in a succession of bodies.

- Wendy Doniger, Merriam-Webster's Encyclopedia of World Religions, Merriam-Webster, Springfield, Massachusetts 1999, pp. 689-690 -

Marcion of Sinope, Marcionites

Quotes about Marcion of Sinope and Marcionites:

Here the pollution by the flesh and its lust, so widespread a theme in this age, is not even mentioned; instead (though not to its exclusion: cf. Tertullian, op. cit. I. 19, where marriage is called a "filthiness" or „obscenity” [spurcitiae]) it is the aspect of repro­duction which disqualifies sexuality - that very aspect which in the eyes of the Church alone justifies it as its purpose under nature's dispensation. Marcion here voices a genuine and typical gnostic argument, whose fullest elaboration we shall meet in Mani: that the reproductive scheme is an ingenious archontic device for the indefinite retention of souls in the world.

- Hans Jonas, The Gnostic Religion. The Message of the Alien God and the Beginnings of Christiantty, Beacon Press, Boston 1958, pp. 144-145 -

de Maupassant Guy

Quotes:

God created only coarse beings, full of the germs of disease, who, after a few years of bestial enjoyment, grow old and infirm, with all the ugliness and all the want of power of human decrepitude. He seems to have made them only in order that they may reproduce their species in an ignoble manner and then die like ephemeral insects. I said reproduce their species in an ignoble manner and I adhere to that expression. What is there as a matter of fact more ignoble and more repugnant than that act of reproduction of living beings, against which all delicate minds always have revolted and always will revolt?

- Guy de Maupassant, Useless Beauty, Wildside Press, Rockville, Maryland 2007 (1890), p. 126 -

Melo Rafael Tages

Books about antinatalism:

A última filosofia: An essay about antinatalism, CreateSpace, 2012 (Portuguese language)

Milosz Czeslaw

Quotes:

I tell myself: Reluctance to think to the end
Is lifesaving for the living. Could lucid consciousness
Bear everything that in every minute,
Simultaneously, occurs on the earth?
Not to harm. Stop eating fish and meat.
Let oneself be castrated, like Tiny, a cat innocent
Of the drownings of kittens every day in our city.

The Cathari were right: Avoid the sin of conception
(For either you kill your seed and will be tormented by conscience
Or you will be responsible for a life of pain).

- Czeslaw Milosz, Pająk (Spider), Dalsze okolice, Znak, Kraków 1991 -

Milton John

Quotes:

If care of our descent perplex us most,
Which must be born to certain woe, devoured
By Death at last; and miserable it is
To be to others cause of misery,
Our own begotten, and of our loins to bring
Into this cursed world a woeful race,
That after wretched life must be at last
Food for so foul a monster; in thy power
It lies, yet ere conception to prevent
The race unblest, to being yet unbegot.
Childless thou art, childless remain: so Death
Shall be deceived his glut, and with us two
Be forced to satisfy his ravenous maw.

- Eve

- John Milton, Paradise lost, Cambridge University Press, New York 2013 (1667), p. 73 -

Mishra Ramesh (under the pseudonym of Ken Coates)

Books about antinatalism:

Anti-Natalism: Rejectionist Philosophy from Buddhism to Benatar, First Edition Design Publisher, 2014

Quotes:

Is it really necessary to endorse existence via procreation and thus prolong it? This too demands a reasoned answer. Programmed by nature and socialized by the collective, which demands conformity, we are required to play the 'game' of life. But as one of Beckett’s characters put sit, ''why this farce day after day?'' Where is all this leading to?

- Ken Coates, Anti-Natalism: Rejectionist Philosophy from Buddhism to Benatar, First Edition Design Publisher, 2014 -

Procreation imposes existence on beings who have not chosen to be born. It amounts to a form of enslavement or conscription which is an immoral act on two counts: violating the autonomy of a potential being, and exposing them to pain and suffering.

- Ken Coates, Anti-Natalism: Rejectionist Philosophy from Buddhism to Benatar, First Edition Design Publisher, 2014 -

Neuffer Martin

Books about antinatalism:

Nein zum Leben - Ein Essay, Safchbuch Fischer, Frankfurt am Main 1992 (German language)

Quotes:

We may ask ourselves whether people have a moral right to create people and thus condemn them to a life and death without their consent.

- Martin Neuffer, Nein zum Leben - Ein Essay, Safchbuch Fischer, Frankfurt am Main 1992, p. 79 -

Onfray Michel

Quotes:

Not having children comes not from dislike or depise, but from love too great to bring them into this world, too limited, too vain, to cruel.

- Michel Onfray, Journal hédoniste: Tome 2, Les Vertus de la foudre, Grasset, Paris 1998 -

Life is, in sum, a race that leads us from the void from whence we emerge to that which engulfs us. Eternity exists for itself. Life breezes past [...] Should we entertain this prank? Should we enrich this cruel play as if none of the above matters? Should we wish to be blinded, to be forever free of blame, not to think but to obey a capricious and imperious libido to give oneself the illusion that one has fought effectively against the perpetually triumphant death?

- Michel Onfray, Journal hédoniste: Tome 2, Les Vertus de la foudre, Grasset, Paris 1998 -

I can at least not contribute, through reproductivity complicit with the vast entropy of the universe, to perpetuating the eternal cruelty of the world and of the destiny of a being I would have snatched from the fog of non-existence to a state they didn't have to be in, to be happy in that moment, as they would be above and beyond that.

- Michel Onfray, Théorie du corps amoureux, Grasset, Paris 2000 -

Why, in the name of what and to what end does one have children? With what legitimacy do we materialise a being out of non-existence to merely propose to them a brief passage on this planet before they return to the very same non-existence?

- Michel Onfray, Théorie du corps amoureux, Grasset, Paris 2000 -

In a hedonistic logic, we ought to avoid imposing anything, existence included, to anyone who hasn't asked for it.

- Michel Onfray, Théorie du corps amoureux, Grasset, Paris 2000 -

Childless by choice love children as much, if not more than their fertile breeders. When asked why he does not have children, Tales replied, "just because of the concern for children."

- Michel Onfray, Théorie du corps amoureux, Grasset, Paris 2000 -

Pereleshin Valerii

Quotes:

The Poem was ''Manichean. It denies life, marriage, and procreation'' (Probably about a poem named ''Poem without a Subject'' [''Poema bez predmeta'']).

- Olga Bakich, Valerii Pereleshin: The Life of a Silkworm, University of Toronto Press, Toronto 2015, p. 195 -

Condemning procreation was the theme of my entire life (...) I have always been tormented by the unneccessary nature, the meaningless, the aimlessness of being.

- Olga Bakich, Valerii Pereleshin: The Life of a Silkworm, University of Toronto Press, Toronto 2015, p. 243 -

The tragedy of my life became the basis for my Manichean world view and for my hatred towards human striving to deveive death by procreation, even though it suits death well: 'mortal children' ensure its triumph (and ensure a steady supply of meat for maggots).

- Olga Bakich, Valerii Pereleshin: The Life of a Silkworm, University of Toronto Press, Toronto 2015, p. 258 -

The perpetuation of suffering by producing children is the greatest crime.

- Olga Bakich, Valerii Pereleshin: The Life of a Silkworm, University of Toronto Press, Toronto 2015, p. 258 -

Perry Sarah

Books about antinatalism:

Every Cradle Is a Grave: Rethinking the Ethics of Birth and Suicide, Nine-Banded Books, Charleston, West Virginia 2014

Pessoa Fernando

Quotes:

Whatever the case, it would have been better not to be born.

- Fernando Pessoa, Passagem Das Horas, 1916 -

Phibionites (also known as Borborites)

Quotes about Phibionites:

The most notorious of the groups that Epiphanius attacks were known by a variety of names, including the „Phibionites”. According to Epiphanius—our sole source of information about the group - these Gnostic believers engaged in nocturnal sex rituals that involved indiscriminate sex, coitus interruptus, and the consumption of semen and menstrual blood, all in a bizarre act of Christian worship (a sacred eucharist). Moreover, they allegedly possessed apostolic books that supported their outrageous rituals, including one known as the „Greater Questions of Mary” (Panarion 26.8). Epiphanius claims to have had access to this and the other Phibionite books. But this one he actually quotes. If the quotation does indeed go back to an actual document, as opposed to Epiphanius's fertile imagination, it is no wonder that the book never survived, as it recounts an episode in which Jesus himself engages in a sex act before a very bewildered Mary Magdalene. For the Gnostic Phibionites, this text, and their corresponding rituals, related to their doctrinal views that humans represent divine sparks entrapped in human bodies, which need to escape. Human procreation perpetuates this state of entrapment, by providing an endless supply of bodies.

- Bart Ehrman, Zlatko Plese, The Apocryphal Gospels: Texts and Translations, Oxford University Press, New York 2011, pp. 607-608 -

Pizzolatto Nic

Quotes:

I think human consciousness, is a tragic misstep in evolution. We became too self-aware, nature created an aspect of nature separate from itself, we are creatures that should not exist by natural law. We are things that labor under the illusion of having a self; a secretion of sensory, experience and feeling, programmed with total assurance that we are each somebody, when in fact everybody is nobody. Maybe the honorable thing for our species to do is deny our programming, stop reproducing, walk hand in hand into extinction, one last midnight, brothers and sisters opting out of a raw deal.

- Rustin Cohle

- Nic Pizzolatto, True Detective, The Long Bright Dark, HBO 2014 -

The hubris it must take to yank a soul out of non existence, into this, meat. And to force a life into this, thresher.

- Rustin Cohle

- Nic Pizzolatto, True Detective, Seeing Things, HBO 2014 -

Prior Matthew

Quotes:

But O! beyond description, happiest he
Who ne'er must roll on life's tumultuous sea;
Who with bless'd freedom, from the general doom
Exempt, must never face the teeming womb,
Nor see the sun, nor sink into the tomb!
Who breathes must suffer; and who thinks must mourn;
And he alone is blessed who ne'er was born.

- Matthew Prior, Solomon, The Poems of Matthew Prior, volume 1, Chiswick Press, London 1822 (1718), p. 271 -

Priscillian of Avila, Priscillianists

Quotes about Priscillian of Avila and Priscillianists:

If anyone condemns human marriage and has a horror of the procreation of living bodies, as Manichaeus and Priscillian have said, let him be anathema.

- Council of Braga II, 561, 241 11., J. T. Noonan Jr., Contraception; a history of its treatment by the Catholic theologians and canonists, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts 1986, p. 61 -

Priscillianists taught a modalist doctrine of the Trinity and denied the pre-existence of Christ as well as his real humanity; they condemned marriage, the procreation of children, and eating meat.

- John Bowker, The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions, Oxford University Press, New York 2000 -

The human body, as all other flesh, according to the Priscillianistic doctrine, came from the devil. (...) The same principles led them to disapprove of marriage, and of the procreationof children; and to forbid the eating of flesh.

- Johann Lorenz Mosheim, Institutes Of Ecclesiastical History, Ancient And Modern... , Nabu Press, Charleston, South Carolina 2011, p. 171 -

Puissance

Quotes:

The hunger that causes our pain of life,
is not a hunger of our own, it is the hunger of our masters, the tiny
strings inside
our genome, they own us, they control us, and they torture us.
Do not reproduce, do not support them, bring them to an end.
Stop the agony of concious life, eradicate life.

- Puissance, Bringer of closure, State Collapse, Equilibrium Music, 2004 -

Puls Heiko

Articles about antinatalism:

- Kant’s Justification of Parental Duties, Kantian Review 21 (1), Cambridge University Press, 2016, pp. 53-75 -

Quartus

Articles about antinatalism:

- Völkerbund, nicht: Völkerkrieg. Ein Blick in die pädagogische Anarchie der Gegenwart zugleich als Beitrag zur nihilistischen Weltanschauung (im Sinne Schopenhauers), 1894 -

Rigoni Mario Andrea

Quotes:

Propagate life is to propagate terror.

- Mario Andrea Rigoni, Variazioni sull'impossibile, Rizzoli, Milano 1993 -

Saturnilus of Antioch

Quotes about Saturnilus of Antioch:

And he affirms that marriage and procreation are from Satan.

- Hippolytus, Refutation of All Heresies, Book VII, Chapter 16. The System of Saturnilus, The Ante-Nicene Fathers: The Writings of the Fathers Down to A. D. 325 volume I - the Apostolic Fathers with Justin Martyr and Irenaeus, Alexander Roberts, Cosimo, New York 2007, p. 349 -

Schopenhauer Arthur

Quotes:

If children were brought into the world by an act of pure reason alone, would the human race continue to exist? Would not a man rather have so much sympathy with the coming generation as to spare it the burden of existence, or at any rate not take it upon himself to impose that burden upon it in cold blood?

- Arthur Schopenhauer, Studies In Pessimism, On the Sufferings of the World, Cosimo, New York 2007, p. 8 -

Some of the church fathers have taught that even marital cohabitation should only be allowed when it occurs merely for the sake of the procreation of children, it attributes this view to the Pythagoreans. This is, however, strictly speaking, incorrect. For if the coitus be no longer desired for its own sake, the negation of the Will-to-Live has already appeared, and the propagation of the human race is then superfluous and senseless, inasmuch as its purpose is already attained. Besides, without any subjective passion, without lust and physical pressure, with sheer deliberation, and the cold blooded purpose to place a human being in the world merely in order that he should be there this would be such a very questionable moral action that few would take it upon themselves; one might even say of it indeed that it stood in the same relation to generation from the mere sexual impulse as a cold-blooded deliberate murder does to a death-stroke given in anger.

- Arthur Schopenhauer, Selected Essays of Schopenhauer, G. Bell and Sons, London 1926, Contributions to the Doctrine of the Affirmation and Nega-tion of the Will-to-live, p. 269 -

The woman's share in procreation is more guiltless than the man's; for he bestows upon the child its will, which is the first sin, and therefore the root of all evil; the woman, on the contrary, bestows its intellect, which is the pathway to redemption.

- Arthur Schopenhauer, Parerga and paralipomena, part 167 -

How shall a man be proud, when his conception is a crime, his birth a penalty, his life a labour, and death a necessity!

- Arthur Schopenhauer, On Human Nature: Essays in Ethics and Politics, Dover Publications, New York 2010, p. 2 -

At bottom, however, it is quite superfluous to dispute whether there is more good or evil in the world: for the mere existence of evil decides the matter. For the evil can never be annulled, and consequently can never be balanced by the good which may exist along with it or after it. ... For that a thousand had lived in happiness and pleasure would never do away with the anguish and death-agony of a single one; and just as little does my present well-being undo my past suffering. If, therefore, the evils in the world were a hundred times less than is the case, yet their mere existence would be sufficient to establish a truth which may be expressed in different ways, though always somewhat indirectly, the truth that we have not to rejoice but rather to mourn at the existence of the world; - that its non-existence would be preferable to its existence; - that it is something which at bottom ought not to be.

- Arthur Schopenhauer, The World As Will And Idea, vol. III., Chapter XLVI. On The Vanity And Suffering Of Life, Routledge & Kegan Paul, London 1964 (1844), p. 386 -

Schreiner Olive

Quotes:

I have no conscience, none, but I would not like to bring a soul into this world. When it sinned and when it suffered something like a dead hand would fall on me - 'You did it, you, for your own pleasure you created this thing! See your work!'

- Lyndall

- Olive Schreiner, The Story of an African Farm, The Floating Press, Auckland 2009 (1883), p. 314 -

Seneca Lucius Annaeus

Quotes:

Nothing is so deceptive, nothing is so treacherous as human life; by Hercules, were it not given to men before they could form an opinion, no one would take it. Not to be born, therefore, is the happiest lot of all, and the nearest thing to this, I imagine, is that we should soon finish our strife here and be restored again to our former rest.

- Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Dialogues and Essays, Consolation to Marcia, 40–45 AD -

Shiffrin Seana

Quotes:

Four factors make the appeal to hypothetical consent problematic: (1) the fact that great harm is not at stake if no action is taken; (2) but if action is taken, the harms suffered may be very severe; (3) the imposed condition cannot be escaped without high costs; and (4) the hypothetical consent procedure is not based on features of the individual who will bear the imposed condition.

- Seana Shiffrin, Wrongful Life, Procreative Responsibility, and the Significance of Harm, Cambridge University Press, 1999, p. 133 -

Singh Asheel

Articles about antinatalism:

Furthering the Case for Anti-natalism: Seana Shiffrin and the Limits of Permissible Harm, South African Journal of Philosophy 2012, volume 31, issue 1, p. 104-116

Assessing anti-natalism : a philosophical examination of the morality of procreation, University of Johannesburg, 2012

Smith Martin

Books about antintalism:

No Baby No Cry, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2013

Quotes:

“Your right to swing your arms ends just where the other man’s nose begins.” (Zechariah Chafee)
Strangely when it comes to procreating, exactly the opposite seems to be the case; couples who do not have children are questioned, procreators get an automatic green flag - a pat on the back from friends and relatives, plus tax breaks from the government. I have even heard it described as “giving the gift of life” .

- Martin Smith, No Baby No Cry, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2013, p. 6 -

By creating a life we subject that person to the harms of life. People will be hurt, some very badly. It seems to me that the only reason for creating lives is to fulfil psychological (and sometimes material) needs of the parents (and to some degree other relatives). It would take libraries to list the gamut of possible harms , ranging from genetic recombination errors at conception, to the last gasp of the dying. We deploy an array of mental gymnastics to avoid the implications of this truth, yet deep down we all know it at some level. Contrary to the norms of our society the arrival of a child should be a time for sober reflection not cause for celebration. I will not congratulate people on gambling someone else’s welfare in the hopes of improving their own lives. I suspect most people reading this will hold that their own needs are a good enough reason to have children. If that is you, then I ask you at least acknowledge the self centred nature of the choice, and perhaps when your children are old enough you can explain why you took a flutter on life’s roulette wheel.

- Martin Smith, No Baby No Cry, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2013, p. 19 -

If you hold eternal damnation, then having children is a very grave business indeed. You are gambling with infinite stakes.

- Martin Smith, No Baby No Cry, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2013, pp. 30-31 -

Smith Robert

Quotes:

I've never regretted not having children. My mindset in that regard has been constant. I objected to being born, and I refuse to impose life on someone else.

- Robert Smith, The Cure's Robert Smith: 'I'm uncomfortable with politicised musicians', The Guardian, 10.09.2011 -

Sophocles

Quotes:

Not to be born at all
Is best, far best that can befall,
Next best, when born, with least delay
To trace the backward way.
For when youth passes with its giddy train,
Troubles on troubles follow, toils on toils,
Pain, pain for ever pain;
And none escapes life's coils.
Envy, sedition, strife,
Carnage and war, make up the tale of life.
Last comes the worst and most abhorred stage
Of unregarded age,
Joyless, companionless and slow,
Of woes the crowning woe.

- Choir

- Sophocles, Oedipus at Colonus, 401 BC -

Soriano Giovanni

Quotes:

Every man and every woman can save human life simply by avoiding conception.

- Giovanni Soriano, Maldetti. Pensieri in soluzione acida, Edizioni Joker, Novi Ligure 2007 -

In every newspaper there is more than enough reasons to discourage a reasonable man to procreate, but still...

- Giovanni Soriano, Finché c'è vita non c'è speranza. Diario aforistico 2003-2009, Kimerik, Patti 2010 -

"Be fruitul and multiply" is a recomendation that fits more into god of rabbits than to god of humans. No offense to rabbits, of course.

- Giovanni Soriano, Finché c'è vita non c'è speranza. Diario aforistico 2003-2009, Kimerik, Patti 2010 -

There is no such thing as a responsible parent, how a responsible parent knowing the world can give life to a child?

- Giovanni Soriano, Malomondo. In lode della stupidità, Fazi, Roma 2013 -

If commendable is a decision of non-eating meat in order to not cause suffering, for the same reason commendable is a decision of non-bringing another meat into this world through procreation.

- Giovanni Soriano, Malomondo. In lode della stupidità, Fazi, Roma 2013 -

Procreation is an act far more authoritarian than killing; and just as one should not take the life of someone else, one should also not impose life on someone else.

- Giovanni Soriano, Malomondo. In lode della stupidità, Fazi, Roma 2013 -

Srivastava Pikesh

Books about antinatalism:

Glimpses of Truth: Morality, Karma, Procreation, Thomson Press, Okhla, New Delhi 2017

Tanner Julia

Articles about antinatalism:

Better Not to Have Children, Think 2011, volume 10, issue 27, pp. 113-121

Thales of Miletus

Quotes about Thales of Miletus:

When he was asked why he has no children his reply was: Because I love children!

- Diogenes Laertios, Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers, 3rd century AD -

Theognis of Megara

Quotes:

Best of all for mortal beings is never to have been born at all. Nor ever to have set eyes on the bright light of the sun.

- Theognis of Megara, Greek Elegiac Poetry: From the Seventh to the Fifth Centuries BC. Tyrtaeus, Solon, Theognis, and Others, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts 1999, p. 234 -

Tolstoy Lev

Quotes:

"But how," I asked, "would the human race continue?" "Yes, would not the human race perish?" he said, irritably and ironically, as if he had expected this familiar and insincere objection. "Teach abstention from child-bearing so that English lords may always gorge themselves -- that is all right. Preach it for the sake of greater pleasure -- that is all right; but just hint at abstention from child-bearing in the name of morality -- and, my goodness, what a rumpus...! Isn't there a danger that the human race may die out because they want to cease to be swine? But forgive me! This light is unpleasant, may I shade it?" he said, pointing to the lamp. I said I did not mind; and with the haste with which he did everything, he got up on the seat and drew the woollen shade over the lamp. "All the same," I said, "if everyone thought this the right thing to do, the human race would cease to exist." He did not reply at once. "You ask how the human race will continue to exist," he said, having again sat down in front of me, and spreading his legs far apart he leant his elbows on his knees. "Why should it continue?" "Why? If not, we should not exist." "And why should we exist?" "Why? In order to live, of course." "But why live? If life has no aim, if life is given us for life's sake, there is no reason for living. And if it is so, then the Schopenhauers, the Hartmanns, and all the buddhists as well, are quite right. But if life has an aim, it is clear that it ought to come to an end when that aim is reached. and so it turns out," he said with a noticeable agitation, evidently prizing his thought very highly. "So it turns out. Just think: if the aim of humanity is goodness, righteousness, love -- call it what you will -- if it is what the prophets have said, that all mankind should be united together in love, that the spears should be beaten into pruning hooks and so forth, what is it that hinders the attainment of this aim? The passions hinder it. Of all the passions the strongest, cruellest, and most stubborn is the sex-passion, physical love; and therefore if the passions are destroyed, including the strongest of them -- physical love -- the prophecies will be fulfilled, mankind will be brought into a unity, the aim of human existence will be attained, and there will be nothing further to live for. As long as mankind exists the ideal is before it, and of course not the rabbits' and pigs' ideal of breeding as fast as possible, nor that of monkeys or Parisians -- to enjoy sex-passion in the most refined manner, but the ideal of goodness attained by continence and purity. Towards that people have always striven and still strive.

- Lev Tolstoy, The Kreutzer Sonata and Other Stories, Oxford University Press, New York 1998 (1889), pp. 109-110 -

Tønnessen Herman

Books about antinatalism:

Jeg velger sannheten: En dialog mellom Peter Wessel Zapffe og Herman Tønnessen, Universitets forlaget, Oslo 1983, co-author with Peter Wessel Zapffe (Norwegian language)

Quotes:

If we can't genetically fix our nature I agree with Zapffe. To leave world to a deserted behind is better than to continue this grotesque carousel of procreation.

- Interview, Gataavisa, issue 103 (8/1984) -

Vallejo Fernando

Quotes:

Heaven and happiness do not exist. That’s your parents’ way to justify the crime of having brought you into this world. What exists is reality, the tough reality, this slaughterhouse we’ve come to die in, if not to kill and to eat the animals, our fellow creatures. Therefore, do not reproduce, do not repeat the crimes committed against you, do not give back the same, evil paid with evil, as imposing life is the ultimate crime. Do not disturb the unborn, let them be in the peace of nothingness, anyway we’ll all eventually go back there, so why beat around the bush?

- Luis Ospina, La desazón suprema: Retrato de Fernando Vallejo, 2003 -

Those I've most loved are my grandma Raquel Pizano and my dog Bruja. I also loved my dad. But after all he is guilty of imposing on me the burden of life. Life's a burden, it's a curse. Those who I loved, now dead, drag me to the grave. It's very hard to carry on without them. The only way I can live is by forgetting them.

- Luis Ospina, La desazón suprema: Retrato de Fernando Vallejo, 2003 -

My concept of sexuality is very simple: every voluntary sexual act not leading to reproduction is innocent. Sexuality does not matter. The crime is when it leads to reproduction.

- Sala de prensa, Streap tease de Fernando Vallejo, 2008 -

Nobody has the right to impose existence to someone else, it's the most terrible crime.

- Patricia Kolesnicov, Clarin, Encuentro Con Vallejo, Pero es que yo vivo en el terror, 18.01.2003 -

Sex is something innocent, procreation is a crime.

- Patricia Kolesnicov, Clarin, Encuentro Con Vallejo, Pero es que yo vivo en el terror, 18.01.2003 -

Nobody has the right to extract from the peaceful nonexistence those who did not ask for it.

- Tomasz Pindel, Błękitne dni, Vallejo, Fernando, Gazeta Wyborcza 29.08.2006 -

Verrecchia Anacleto

Quotes:

The only misfortune of those who have never been born is that they know nothing about their fortune.

- Anacleto Verrecchia, Rapsodia viennese, Donzelli, Roma 2003 -

Vetter Hermann

Articles about antinatalism:

The production of children as a problem for utilitarian ethics, Inquiry 12, 1969, pp. 445-447

Utilitarianism and New Generations, Minds, 1971, 80 (318), pp. 301-302

Quotes:

There is no moral reasons for starting someone's existence on account of the happiness he would experience. (...) There is a moral reason for not starting someone's existence on account of the unhappiness he would experience.

- Hermann Vetter, The production of children as a problem for utilitarian ethics, Inquiry 12, 1969, p. 446 -

In any case, it is morally preferable not to produce a child. This requires that in any individual encounter, and by any institutional activity in education, mass media, economic and legal policy, people should be discouraged from having children. If such tendencies are successful enough, the number of men on earth may begin to decrease, and if such development continues long enough, the human race will disappear.

- Hermann Vetter, Utilitarianism and New Generations, Minds, 1971, 80 (318), p. 302 -

Vichy-Chamrond Marie Anne de

Quotes:

All conditions and all circumstances seem equally unfortunate to me, from the angel to the oyster. The grievous thing is to be born.

- Kathleen Norris, Acedia & me: A Marriage, Monks, and a Writer's Life, Letter to Voltaire, 1759, Penguin Books, London 2008 -

Voltaire

Quotes:

Life has so few charms!
And yet we desire it.
No more pleasure, no more power,
in the horrors of death.
A dead lion is not worth
a midge that breathes.
O unfortunate mortal!
Whether your soul is enjoying
the moment given to you,
or whether death is ending it,
both are torture.
It is better not to have been born.

- Voltaire, Precis de Ecclesiaste, Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, volume 29, issue 4, 2005 -

Voluntary Human Extinction Movement

Quotes:

May we live long and die out.

- Will Anderson, This Is Hope: Green Vegans and the New Human Ecology, John Hunt Publishing, 2013, p. 25 -

Phasing out the human race by voluntarily ceasing to breed will allow Earth’s biosphere to return to good health. Crowded conditions and resource shortages will improve as we become less dense.

- Charles F. Gritzner, Environment and Natural Resources, Infobase Publishing, 2010, p. 113 -

Weininger Otto

Quotes:

Every form of fecundity is loathsome, and no one who is honest with himself feels bound to provide for the continuity of the human race. And what we do not realise to be a duty, is not a duty. On the contrary, it is immoral to procreate a human being for any secondary reason, to bring a being into the limitations of humanity, the conditions made for him by his parentage; the fundamental question why the possible freedom and spontaneity of a human being is limited is that he was begotten in such a limited fashion. That the human race should persist is of no interest whatsoever to reason; he who would perpetuate humanity would perpetuate the problem and the guilt; the only problem and the only guilt.

- Otto Weininger, Sex & Character, W. Heinemann, 1906, p. 346 -

Weisberg David, Cook Douglas

Quotes:

I really believe anyone thinking even thinking of bringing a child in to the world is coldly considering an act of cruelty.

- Stanley Goodspeed

- David Weisberg, Douglas Cook, The Rock, 1996 -

Wisdom of Silenus

Quotes:

Oh, wretched ephemeral race, children of chance and misery, why do why do you compel me to tell you what it would be most expedient for you not to hear? What is best of all is utterly beyond your reach: not to be born, not to be, to be nothing. But the second best for you is - to die soon.

- Friedrich Nietzsche, The Birth Of Tragedy, Courier Dover Publications, New York 2012 (1872), p. 8 -

Wisnowska Maria

Quotes:

Not to be born is the first step to happiness. If someone by unhappy accident is here on Earth, one thing should comfort him; he will return to the original state.

- Agata Tuszyńska, Wydawnictwo Książkowe Twój Styl, Warszawa, 2003 -

Woolf Virginia

Quotes:

One cannot bring children into a world like this. One cannot perpetuate suffering, or increase the breed of these lustful animals, who have no lasting emotions, but only whims and vanities, eddying them now this way, now that.

- Septimus Warren Smith

- Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway, Interactive Media, 2012 (1925), p. 70 -

Yanase Naoki

Quotes:

Simply put, upon a nihilistic basis, I deeply believe that making children is nothing but a hopeless action. This thought can not possibly be removed, and I no longer care to remove it. In terms of pleasure, humans are unpredictable when they will drown in it, and for this reason, one should not create children to avoid getting them entangled in the mess. Children are, horrifyingly, just thrown out into this world as a result of egoistical adults who craves pleasure, with the child's life having attributed meaning afterwards so arbitrarily.

- 翻訳からの回路, Hakuyosha, 1984 -

Zapffe Peter Wessel

Articles about antinatalism:

The Last Messiah, Philosophy Now 2004 (1933), number 45

Books about antinatalism:

Om det tragiske, Pax Forlag, Oslo 1996 (1941) (Norwegian language)

Jeg velger sannheten: En dialog mellom Peter Wessel Zapffe og Herman Tønnessen, Oslo, Universitets forlaget 1983, co-author with Herman Tønnessen (Norwegian language)

Quotes:

The sign of doom is written on your brows - how long will ye kick against the pin-pricks? But there is one conquest and one crown, one redemption and one solution. Know yourselves - be infertile and let the earth be silent after ye.

- Peter Wessel Zapffe, The Last Messiah, Philosophy Now, march/april 2004 (1933) -

Above all, we must make the reproductive question ethically relevant. A coin is turned around before it is handed to the beggar, yet a child is unflinchingly tossed into cosmic bruteness.

- Peter Wessel Zapffe, Essays og epistler, Gyldendal, Oslo 1967 -

The sooner humanity dares to harmonise itself with its biological predicament, the better. And this means to willingly withdraw in contempt for its worldly terms, just as the heat-craving species went extinct when temperatures dropped. To us, it is the moral climate of the cosmos that is intolerable, and a two-child policy could make our discontinuance a pain-free one. Yet instead we are expanding and succeeding everywhere, as necessity has taught us to mutilate the formula in our hearts. Perhaps the most unreasonable effect of such invigorating vulgarisation is the doctrine that the individual „has a duty” to suffer nameless agony and a terrible death if this saves or benefits the rest of his group. Anyone who declines is subjected to doom and death, instead of the revulsion being directed at the world-order engendering the situation. To any independent observer, this plainly is to juxtapose incommensurable things; no future triumph or metamorphosis can justify the pitiful blighting of a human being against his will. It is upon a pavement of battered destinies that the survivors storm ahead toward new bland sensations and mass deaths.

- Interview by Henning Sinding-Larsen, Aftenposten 1959 -

For me, a desert island is no tragedy, neither is a deserted planet.

- Nina Witoszek, Andrew Brennan, Philosophical Dialogues, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Lanham, Maryland 1999, page 192 -

In accordance with my conception of life, I have chosen not to bring children into the world. A coin is examined, and only after careful deliberation, given to a beggar, whereas a child is flung out into the cosmic brutality without hesitation.

- Trond Brede Andersen, Hva det betyr at være menneske, 1990 -

Mankind ought to end its existence of its own will.

- Trond Brede Andersen, Hva det betyr at være menneske, 1990 -

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