THE NIGHTMARE NETWORK
Go Back   THE NIGHTMARE NETWORK > Wayward Distractions > Art
Home Forums Content Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Contagion Members Media Diversion Info Register
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes Translate
Old 07-10-2006   #1
Nemonymous's Avatar
Nemonymous
Grimscribe
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 4,490
Quotes: 0
Points: 145,566, Level: 100 Points: 145,566, Level: 100 Points: 145,566, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 99% Activity: 99% Activity: 99%
Modern Art

I love all forms of modern art. Anyone got strong views for or against.

I only give two examples at this stage:

(i) Modern serious (classical?) music such as that by Penderecki*, Ligeti, Thomas Ades, James MacMillan etc. etc. really conveys, for me, the feel and ethos of HORROR!!

*have you heard his 'Threnody For the Victims of Hiroshima', just as one example?


(ii) The World Cup. The Final stamped forever the intrinsic dark symbolism of the event for me. Ranging from Figo's headbutt, Rooney's kickback into balls, Zidane's insane or (more likely) gratuitous act last night (both clownish and vicious), playing a single match with many random matchballs (not one noumenon of a matchball for the players to devote their team spirit), the dreamlike dives - not of graceful dancers or birds but human bodies clumsily burying themselves into the Earth ball itself...

In contrast, I watched the BBC's goals of the tournament, one after the other in quick succession (including the beautiful ballet of the best goal of them all), and I was glad I had been part of it all, even as a spectator through the reality screens: yet another 'Big Brother'-like extravaganza of mixed emotions. Modern Art at its best and worst.

des

MY WEBSITE: www.nemonymous.com
Nemonymous is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanks From:
miguel1984 (04-12-2017)
Old 07-11-2006   #2
Nemonymous's Avatar
Nemonymous
Grimscribe
Threadstarter
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 4,490
Quotes: 0
Points: 145,566, Level: 100 Points: 145,566, Level: 100 Points: 145,566, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 99% Activity: 99% Activity: 99%
So, yes, following on from above with further reflection, I suggest that 'ignoring' an audience *is* far more possible these days than 'confronting' or 'insulting' them... because we are all over-dosed on blank canvases or lumps of stale food in the corner of a glass case?

Then the topic, inevitably, leads to a further question. Are there artists who want to insult an audience or need to do so? And, if so, why?

And is ignoring an audience a new art form? The extreme of this attitude would to keep the work in a cupboard. Buried Art. Has Buried Art replaced Modern Art?

This does not sit well, personally, with me giving away all my new works in recent years on free blogs. But I feel that that act may be a brand of Buried Art. Overexposed free Art (which nobody reads) is akin to Buried Art!

des (brainstorming)

MY WEBSITE: www.nemonymous.com
Nemonymous is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanks From:
miguel1984 (04-12-2017)
Old 04-12-2017   #3
ToALonelyPeace's Avatar
ToALonelyPeace
Grimscribe
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 609
Quotes: 0
Points: 23,518, Level: 100 Points: 23,518, Level: 100 Points: 23,518, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 83% Activity: 83% Activity: 83%
Re: Modern Art

I watched this documentary the other day
It's hard to describe the state of art today. While it has never been more open-minded, more available to the public, more challenging-it has also become an amusement for the public and a sport for the critics. I don't know any rule left to break and it gets old when the artist keeps trying to provoke me. In order to understand such and such piece, I need to know all these context...and of course the piece is a peeled banana.

"Tell me how you want to die, and I'll tell you who you are. In other words, how do you fill out an empty life? With women, books, or worldly ambitions? No matter what you do, the starting point is boredom, and the end self-destruction. The emblem of our fate: the sky teeming with worms. Baudelaire taught me that life is the ecstasy of worms in the sun, and happiness the dance of worms."
---Tears and Saints, E. M. Cioran
ToALonelyPeace is offline   Reply With Quote
4 Thanks From:
Kevin (04-12-2017), miguel1984 (04-12-2017), Mr. Veech (04-12-2017), Nemonymous (04-12-2017)
Old 04-12-2017   #4
qcrisp's Avatar
qcrisp
Grimscribe
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,050
Quotes: 0
Points: 68,532, Level: 100 Points: 68,532, Level: 100 Points: 68,532, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 17% Activity: 17% Activity: 17%
Re: Modern Art

I'm afraid that, each time I read Coomaraswamy, after my initial adverse reaction, I find myself agreeing with him more and more on art:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ananda...#Contributions

http://www.studiesincomparativerelig...maraswamy.aspx

Quote
At this point I must digress to correct a widespread confusion. There exists a general impression that modern abstract art is in some way like and related to, or even "inspired" by the formality of primitive art. The likeness is altogether superficial. Our abstraction is nothing but a mannerism. Neolithic art is abstract, or rather algebraic, because it is only an algebraical form that can be the single form of very different things. The forms of early Greek are what they are because it is only in such forms that the polar balance of physical and metaphysical can be maintained. "To have forgotten", as Bernheimer recently said, "this purpose before the mirage of absolute patterns and designs is perhaps the fundamental fallacy of the abstract movement in art." The modern abstractionist forgets that the Neolithic formalist was not an interior decorator, but a metaphysical man who saw life whole and had to live by his wits; one who did not, as we seek to, live by bread alone, for as the anthropologists assure us, primitive cultures provided for the needs of the soul and the body at one and the same time. The Museum exhibition should amount to an exhortation to return to these savage levels of culture.
I think there's some kind of balance to be struck between Platonism and naturalistic mimesis, though, so in that, and other ways, my convergence with Coomaraswamy might never become complete.

I also consider myself open-minded. I remember enjoying an exhibition of the works of the much-maligned Jeff Koons in Chicago, and imagine I would do so again, given the opportunity.

I've never enjoyed anything by Damien Hirst in the same way, though, for some reason, people seem to be less disparaging of him.

Anyway, to summarise: In matters of art, as in other things, I do believe, indeed, there is a Dao, but the Dao that can be named is not the eternal Dao.

ôSpecialists without spirit, sensualists without heart; this nullity imagines that it has attained a level of civilization never before achieved." - Max Weber
qcrisp is online now   Reply With Quote
4 Thanks From:
Kevin (04-12-2017), miguel1984 (04-12-2017), Mr. Veech (04-12-2017), ToALonelyPeace (04-12-2017)
Old 04-12-2017   #5
Mr. Veech's Avatar
Mr. Veech
Grimscribe
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 817
Quotes: 0
Points: 12,053, Level: 76 Points: 12,053, Level: 76 Points: 12,053, Level: 76
Level up: 1% Level up: 1% Level up: 1%
Activity: 83% Activity: 83% Activity: 83%
Re: Modern Art

Modern art is a symptom of cultural decay. It's possible for everyone to be an artist now that art itself has been democratized in the worst possible way. I think most people realize this, but they withhold judgment because they don't want to appear elitist.

Technique as well as thousands upon thousands of hours of practice and study are absolutely essential for the actual artist. The modern works of art I've seen lack all of the aforementioned qualities. Instead, I'm asked to forget the actual labor that goes into making a brilliant sculpture or painting and focus on the "political" statement the "artist" wished to convey. I wish we could implement standards once again. That will be the day.

Modern art? No thanks.

"In a less scientific age, he would have been a devil-worshipper, a partaker in the abominations of the Black Mass; or would have given himself to the study and practice of sorcery. His was a religious soul that had failed to find good in the scheme of things; and lacking it, was impelled to make of evil itself an object of secret reverence."

~ Clark Ashton Smith, "The Devotee of Evil"
Mr. Veech is offline   Reply With Quote
4 Thanks From:
Kevin (04-12-2017), miguel1984 (04-12-2017), qcrisp (04-12-2017), ToALonelyPeace (04-12-2017)
Old 04-12-2017   #6
Robert Adam Gilmour
Grimscribe
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 1,569
Quotes: 0
Points: 23,561, Level: 100 Points: 23,561, Level: 100 Points: 23,561, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 67% Activity: 67% Activity: 67%
Re: Modern Art

Never know where "modern" begins for people unless they say when.

As much as I like formal virtuosity and wish more people taken that path, it hurts to wonder how much beautifully primitive outsider art was destroyed or just never given a spotlight because it wasn't following enough rules.

I'm not a fan of the typical conceptual art but at least it's there for people who like it, I just wish they weren't hogging so much gallery space and wish there hadn't been such a simplistic chronology, only allowing a narrow group of trends to exist for such a long time.

If art was more democratic there would be a lot more variety in prestigious galleries. With the internet lots of great artists are getting bigger audiences who don't fit into whatever the big galleries want (but they probably take notice eventually). Yet even with the opportunities of tumblr and other social media, a lot of them should be far more famous.

I liked Grayson Perry saying "the cutting edge has no edge" and Brian Sewell (who's probably even a bit too old fashioned for me) saying that the more different a certain type of artist tries to be, the more samey they look with all the others.


Last edited by Robert Adam Gilmour; 04-12-2017 at 04:45 PM..
Robert Adam Gilmour is offline   Reply With Quote
5 Thanks From:
gveranon (04-12-2017), Kevin (04-12-2017), miguel1984 (04-13-2017), Mr. Veech (04-12-2017), ToALonelyPeace (04-12-2017)
Old 04-12-2017   #7
Nemonymous's Avatar
Nemonymous
Grimscribe
Threadstarter
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 4,490
Quotes: 0
Points: 145,566, Level: 100 Points: 145,566, Level: 100 Points: 145,566, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 99% Activity: 99% Activity: 99%
Re: Modern Art

Marcel Duchamp is still 'modern' art.
Many hobby painters painting today are not 'modern' but painting for chocolate boxes.

MY WEBSITE: www.nemonymous.com
Nemonymous is offline   Reply With Quote
2 Thanks From:
miguel1984 (04-13-2017), ToALonelyPeace (04-12-2017)
Old 04-12-2017   #8
qcrisp's Avatar
qcrisp
Grimscribe
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,050
Quotes: 0
Points: 68,532, Level: 100 Points: 68,532, Level: 100 Points: 68,532, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 17% Activity: 17% Activity: 17%
Re: Modern Art


ôSpecialists without spirit, sensualists without heart; this nullity imagines that it has attained a level of civilization never before achieved." - Max Weber
qcrisp is online now   Reply With Quote
5 Thanks From:
gveranon (04-12-2017), miguel1984 (04-13-2017), Robert Adam Gilmour (04-12-2017), ToALonelyPeace (04-12-2017), waffles (04-13-2017)
Old 04-12-2017   #9
Robert Adam Gilmour
Grimscribe
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 1,569
Quotes: 0
Points: 23,561, Level: 100 Points: 23,561, Level: 100 Points: 23,561, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 67% Activity: 67% Activity: 67%
Re: Modern Art

That book "Raw Creation" glimpsed in the video above is very good. That's actually where I learned that it was such a fight to give outsider art a place and save it from total obscurity.

Robert Adam Gilmour is offline   Reply With Quote
3 Thanks From:
miguel1984 (04-13-2017), qcrisp (04-12-2017), ToALonelyPeace (04-12-2017)
Old 04-12-2017   #10
Mr. Veech's Avatar
Mr. Veech
Grimscribe
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 817
Quotes: 0
Points: 12,053, Level: 76 Points: 12,053, Level: 76 Points: 12,053, Level: 76
Level up: 1% Level up: 1% Level up: 1%
Activity: 83% Activity: 83% Activity: 83%
Re: Modern Art

Quote Originally Posted by Robert Adam Gilmour View Post
Never know where "modern" begins for people unless they say when.

As much as I like formal virtuosity and wish more people taken that path, it hurts to wonder how much beautifully primitive outsider art was destroyed or just never given a spotlight because it wasn't following enough rules.

I'm not a fan of the typical conceptual art but at least it's there for people who like it, I just wish they weren't hogging so much gallery space and wish there hadn't been such a simplistic chronology, only allowing a narrow group of trends to exist for such a long time.

If art was more democratic there would be a lot more variety in prestigious galleries. With the internet lots of great artists are getting bigger audiences who don't fit into whatever the big galleries want (but they probably take notice eventually). Yet even with the opportunities of tumblr and other social media, a lot of them should be far more famous.

I liked Grayson Perry saying "the cutting edge has no edge" and Brian Sewell (who's probably even a bit too old fashioned for me) saying that the more different a certain type of artist tries to be, the more samey they look with all the others.
I get what you're saying. I just think there needs to be difficult boundaries for everything, especially art. I look at it like this. Time is expensive. Is it fair for a da Vinci painting, which took an inordinate amount of time to create, to be directly compared to a heap of metal or splotches of paint, either of which required one fraction of the time and skill to create? I don't think it is. While da Vinci labored intensely, some random artist spent most of his or her time discussing the political relevance of their modern art over cocktails.

It's all about time, i.e., personal sacrifice.

The same applies to literature. I'm not here to stroke anyone's ego, but just take a look at Locrian's The Secret of Ventriloquism. The main reason it's good is because of the time it took to actually write. Now compare that book with your average bestseller which took less than a year to write. I'd even say that if Ligotti, for instance, made room for two or three more books, it would've marred his writing talent considerably.

All about time.

"In a less scientific age, he would have been a devil-worshipper, a partaker in the abominations of the Black Mass; or would have given himself to the study and practice of sorcery. His was a religious soul that had failed to find good in the scheme of things; and lacking it, was impelled to make of evil itself an object of secret reverence."

~ Clark Ashton Smith, "The Devotee of Evil"
Mr. Veech is offline   Reply With Quote
2 Thanks From:
miguel1984 (04-13-2017), ToALonelyPeace (04-12-2017)
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
art, modern

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What's Wrong with Modern Life? Pessimist Philosophy 33 04-15-2017 01:38 PM
Modern Days (my acoustic rendition) LeglessSaltyDiogenes YouTube Selections 3 08-25-2014 08:26 PM
7 Modern Ghost Towns That Look Like Sci-Fi Movies Cnev Off Topic 1 04-11-2013 10:59 AM
Modern Mythos Library Update Evans Rants & Ravings 0 06-13-2011 07:36 AM
The Modern Word Dr. Bantham Literature 0 08-04-2007 10:57 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:56 AM.



Style Based on SONGS OF A DEAD DREAMER as Published by Silver Scarab Press
Design and Artwork by Harry Morris
Emulated in Hell by Dr. Bantham
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Template-Modifications by TMS