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Old 06-19-2017   #11
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Re: Classics Online

Quote Originally Posted by Druidic View Post
Before At the Mountains of Madness, before Who Goes There? there was "In Amundsen's Tent" by John Martin Leahy.
A Pulp Classic of ghastly horror in The Great White Space.
And before them there was this classic Arctic-set horror:

The Seventh Man by Arthur Quiller-Couch

Who provideth for the raven his food?
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Old 06-19-2017   #12
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Re: Classics Online

I've posted this one to the board before, but it bears repeating here:

Over the River by P. Schuyler Miller

It's a great vampire story, but it's also a tale that manages to communicate a strong and terrible sense of "Otherness" like few horror stories I'm aware of.

Most stories told from a monstrous perspective seem intent on humanizing "the Other", whether to make some sort of ideological point or simply due to a lack of writerly skill and imagination. This is one that gets it right, as far as I'm concerned, creating a vivid impression of a truly otherworldly, unnatural, inhuman perspective, one driven by the cold anguish of death and an awful, murderous hunger.

It deserves to be considered a classic.

Who provideth for the raven his food?
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Old 06-19-2017   #13
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Re: Classics Online

Nice, cannibal.

And we shouldn't forget John Taine's tale of antarctic exploration, The Greatest Adventure which really goes back a bit.

But it's a novel.
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Old 06-19-2017   #14
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Re: Classics Online

The ice and snow stories always get me. I really enjoyed The Terror by Dan Simmons.

Lucian pigeon-holed the letter solemnly in the receptacle lettered 'Barbarians.' ~ The Hill of Dreams by Arthur Machen

“The wallpaper and I are fighting a duel to the death. One or the other of us has to go.” – Oscar Wilde
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Old 06-24-2017   #15
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Re: Classics Online

I still think Hawthorne is up there alongside Poe, Lovecraft, and Ligotti as one of America's greatest writers:

http://www.eldritchpress.org/nh/mmm.html

"In a less scientific age, he would have been a devil-worshipper, a partaker in the abominations of the Black Mass; or would have given himself to the study and practice of sorcery. His was a religious soul that had failed to find good in the scheme of things; and lacking it, was impelled to make of evil itself an object of secret reverence."

~ Clark Ashton Smith, "The Devotee of Evil"
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Old 06-25-2017   #16
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Re: Classics Online

Yes, Hawthorne is one of the Greats. I'm fond of "The Marble Faun" and "House of the Seven Gables" as well as shorter works like "Young Goodman Brown." But I think I prefer Melville in general. "Bartleby the Scrivener" is one of the finest weird tales ever penned and Moby Dick is beyond wonderful. But both figures were giants of the 19th Century.

http://www.bartleby.com/129/

Mr. Veech, have you ever read Holmes' "Elsie Venner"? It's very much reminiscent of Hawthorne and has some memorable moments of weirdness.
This may sound blasphemous but I prefer the abridged edition. It was done with love and care.
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Old 06-25-2017   #17
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Re: Classics Online

Quote Originally Posted by Druidic View Post
Yes, Hawthorne is one of the Greats. I'm fond of "The Marble Faun" and "House of the Seven Gables" as well as shorter works like "Young Goodman Brown." But I think I prefer Melville in general. "Bartleby the Scrivener" is one of the finest weird tales ever penned and Moby Dick is beyond wonderful. But both figures were giants of the 19th Century.

http://www.bartleby.com/129/

Mr. Veech, have you ever read Holmes' "Elsie Venner"? It's very much reminiscent of Hawthorne and has some memorable moments of weirdness.
This may sound blasphemous but I prefer the abridged edition. It was done with love and care.
I have not, but I intend to. I like Melville as well, but I prefer the melancholy Puritanism behind Hawthorne's stories; they resonate with me far more than Melville's "maritime" stories. As a matter of fact, I feel more at home with Hawthorne than I do with either Lovecraft or Melville. You really get a sense of the world's "evilness" with Poe, Hawthorne, and Ligotti.

"In a less scientific age, he would have been a devil-worshipper, a partaker in the abominations of the Black Mass; or would have given himself to the study and practice of sorcery. His was a religious soul that had failed to find good in the scheme of things; and lacking it, was impelled to make of evil itself an object of secret reverence."

~ Clark Ashton Smith, "The Devotee of Evil"
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Old 06-25-2017   #18
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Re: Classics Online

"Bartleby" is one of the few pieces of writing to have moved me to tears. I'm very much a fan of Melville- Moby Dick is not a novel; it's a poem.

I enjoy some of Hawthorne's stories very much, too. The end of "The Minister's Black Veil," where the narrator is contemplating the Minister's rotting, veiled body is incredibly powerful. An excellent tale.
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Old 06-25-2017   #19
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Re: Classics Online

Quote Originally Posted by Raul Urraca View Post
"Bartleby" is one of the few pieces of writing to have moved me to tears. I'm very much a fan of Melville- Moby Dick is not a novel; it's a poem.

I enjoy some of Hawthorne's stories very much, too. The end of "The Minister's Black Veil," where the narrator is contemplating the Minister's rotting, veiled body is incredibly powerful. An excellent tale.
I've no doubt that Moby Dick is a masterpiece. Nevertheless, it was far too playful for my taste. Again, that's not to say it's not a masterpiece, because it quite clearly is.

"In a less scientific age, he would have been a devil-worshipper, a partaker in the abominations of the Black Mass; or would have given himself to the study and practice of sorcery. His was a religious soul that had failed to find good in the scheme of things; and lacking it, was impelled to make of evil itself an object of secret reverence."

~ Clark Ashton Smith, "The Devotee of Evil"
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Old 06-25-2017   #20
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Re: Classics Online

Hey, Mr. Veech!

Of course it all comes down to preference in the end. Ligotti is quite right on that.

But Durrenmatt claimed all great Art was 'playful'. (What are your thoughts on that?) Assuming that is true, we have to assume there is an element of play in even the most dour of artists.

Lovecraft never struck me as dour. But there was, I believe, an element of play that ran through much of his fiction. He seemed to delight in including disguised bits of autobiography in his fiction and I suspect this was a conscious artistic decision, not an unconscious Freudian thing. I'm sure he never dreamed that future critics would notice this. How could he? He died thinking his work was an abject failure.
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