THE NIGHTMARE NETWORK
Go Back   THE NIGHTMARE NETWORK > Discussion & Interpretation > Other Authors > General Discussion
Home Forums Content Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Contagion Members Media Diversion Info Register
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes Translate
Old 09-04-2015   #41
R.P.Dwyer
Acolyte
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 90
Quotes: 0
Points: 4,776, Level: 47 Points: 4,776, Level: 47 Points: 4,776, Level: 47
Level up: 13% Level up: 13% Level up: 13%
Activity: 7% Activity: 7% Activity: 7%
Re: What other central european authors do you read?

Quote Originally Posted by Druidic View Post
Thanks, Mr. Dwyer for your comments on Durrenmatt. Durrenmatt is relatively unknown in English-speaking countries and if book publishers ever decide to bring out his untranslated works, it will be thanks to readers like yourself. Are you aware of "The Pledge"? Like "Traps" it's a major work and easily available thanks to the Penn movie of a few years back.

Mark Samuels did me a real kindness and sent me a copy from London of Durrenmatt's one act play, "Conversation at Night with a Despised Character". It was televised on the BBC in 1969 with Sir John Gielgud and Sir Alec Guinness. It's the story of a writer's encounter with the assassin sent to kill him by the State. (Earlier, D. had taken aim at the Black fascists with "Suspicion"; this time he had the Red fascists in his sights.) It's a brilliant work with the author at the peak of his powers.

WARNING: SPOILER AHEAD

The ending isn't a twist; it's a warm pretzel, nicely salted, and with spicy mustard. Any other writer would have the Author lecture and teach the Hangman a thing or two about basic humanity, perhaps even instill deep doubts about the 'rightness' of his profession. But this is Durrenmatt. Guess who teaches who how to "die humbly" and unconquered?
I would have loved to have seen this with those two great actors.
Sorry for the late reply. I haven't read the others works you mentioned, and will seek it. I heard that the The Pledge is sort of a critique of the detective genre. I have some problems about that genre too.

I first heard of Durrenmatt through......Colin Wilson! Another writer that Colin Wilson thought highly of is David Lindsay. And I just recently found out that Colin Wilson was a big fan of Grabinski
https://www.facebook.com/permalink.p...d=104187931790

Durrenmat, David Lindsay, Grabinski. Colin Wilson had some excellent literary judgment.
R.P.Dwyer is offline   Reply With Quote
4 Thanks From:
bendk (09-04-2016), Doctor Dugald Eldritch (09-09-2015), Druidic (09-06-2015), miguel1984 (11-06-2015)
Old 11-06-2015   #42
AndrewSFTSN's Avatar
AndrewSFTSN
Mannikin
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 13
Quotes: 0
Points: 1,314, Level: 21 Points: 1,314, Level: 21 Points: 1,314, Level: 21
Level up: 14% Level up: 14% Level up: 14%
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: What other central european authors do you read?

I'm nowhere near well read as the average TLO forum member it seems but have enjoyed works by

Robert Walser
Witold Gombrowicz
Jaroslav Hasek
(Some) Stanislaw Lem
Skylark by Dezso Kosztolyani
AndrewSFTSN is offline   Reply With Quote
5 Thanks From:
bendk (09-04-2016), ChildofOldLeech (11-06-2015), Doctor Dugald Eldritch (11-06-2015), miguel1984 (11-06-2015), ToALonelyPeace (10-10-2016)
Old 09-04-2016   #43
xylokopos
Mystic
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 204
Quotes: 0
Points: 7,378, Level: 60 Points: 7,378, Level: 60 Points: 7,378, Level: 60
Level up: 14% Level up: 14% Level up: 14%
Activity: 7% Activity: 7% Activity: 7%
Re: What other central european authors do you read?



I finished this book a few hours ago on a flight back to the city where I live. It is a book about books and since all of us here are People of the Book, I recommend it without the slightest hesitation. Too loud a solitude also continues a grand European tradition of alienated narrators with intense inner lives, but deviates from the path trod by Dostoyevsky and Kafka and many others through its weirdly uplifting, almost slapstick scatology, and its even grimmer ending.

I fear I am not doing this book justice. Too loud a solitude is the story of a lonely man in a [slightly] alternative post-WWII Prague, where books are destroyed en masse; the narrator is employed as a compactor of books and wastepaper. He toils in a cellar, in front of a hydraulic press, which he feeds all sorts of paper, from reproductions of Van Gogh's paintings, to blooded wrapping paper from the city's butcheries to leatherbound volumes of Nietzsche, Hegel, Kant and Novalis. The hydraulic press compacts wastepaper and Hanta, the narrator, ties together gigantic bales which are then dispatched via lorries to the city's papermills, where the pulped paper is doused in alkalis and other chemicals and emerges virgin and blank again.

In the course of his travails in his rat-infested cellar next to mountains of paper and his hydraulic press, Hanta manages to save thousands of books from destruction and drags them to his room, where he sleeps under "two tons of them", a permanent Sword of Damocles hanging over his drunk sleep.

As he works and as he drinks beer he remembers stories spanning his thirty-five years as destroyer of books and creator of bales of compacted paper. I won't reveal the content of these stories except to write that they are a strange mix of love and cruelty and I won't reveal the ending except to write that it broke my heart, even though it was foretold in many ways. After all, we all become obsolete in the end, foreigners in our own lives, men overtaken by events beyond us; we always end up as depositories of memories that mean nothing to others but everything to us.

We all start out as books and end up as bales of wastepaper.

xylokopos is offline   Reply With Quote
6 Thanks From:
bendk (09-04-2016), ChildofOldLeech (09-04-2016), Kevin (09-04-2016), Michael (09-04-2016), miguel1984 (09-04-2016), ToALonelyPeace (10-10-2016)
Old 09-04-2016   #44
bendk's Avatar
bendk
Grimscribe
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,588
Quotes: 1
Points: 183,187, Level: 100 Points: 183,187, Level: 100 Points: 183,187, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 50% Activity: 50% Activity: 50%
Re: What other central european authors do you read?

Quote Originally Posted by xylokopos View Post


I finished this book a few hours ago on a flight back to the city where I live. It is a book about books and since all of us here are People of the Book, I recommend it without the slightest hesitation. Too loud a solitude also continues a grand European tradition of alienated narrators with intense inner lives, but deviates from the path trod by Dostoyevsky and Kafka and many others through its weirdly uplifting, almost slapstick scatology, and its even grimmer ending.

I fear I am not doing this book justice. Too loud a solitude is the story of a lonely man in a [slightly] alternative post-WWII Prague, where books are destroyed en masse; the narrator is employed as a compactor of books and wastepaper. He toils in a cellar, in front of a hydraulic press, which he feeds all sorts of paper, from reproductions of Van Gogh's paintings, to blooded wrapping paper from the city's butcheries to leatherbound volumes of Nietzsche, Hegel, Kant and Novalis. The hydraulic press compacts wastepaper and Hanta, the narrator, ties together gigantic bales which are then dispatched via lorries to the city's papermills, where the pulped paper is doused in alkalis and other chemicals and emerges virgin and blank again.

In the course of his travails in his rat-infested cellar next to mountains of paper and his hydraulic press, Hanta manages to save thousands of books from destruction and drags them to his room, where he sleeps under "two tons of them", a permanent Sword of Damocles hanging over his drunk sleep.

As he works and as he drinks beer he remembers stories spanning his thirty-five years as destroyer of books and creator of bales of compacted paper. I won't reveal the content of these stories except to write that they are a strange mix of love and cruelty and I won't reveal the ending except to write that it broke my heart, even though it was foretold in many ways. After all, we all become obsolete in the end, foreigners in our own lives, men overtaken by events beyond us; we always end up as depositories of memories that mean nothing to others but everything to us.

We all start out as books and end up as bales of wastepaper.

Book sounds great. And "slapstick scatology" LOL. So glad I dropped by TLO today.

On a second note, I think TLOers would really enjoy Kadare's Palace of Dreams and The Pyramid.
bendk is offline   Reply With Quote
4 Thanks From:
ChildofOldLeech (09-04-2016), miguel1984 (09-05-2016), ToALonelyPeace (10-10-2016), xylokopos (09-21-2016)
Old 12-22-2016   #45
Chroale
Mannikin
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 6
Quotes: 0
Points: 1,184, Level: 19 Points: 1,184, Level: 19 Points: 1,184, Level: 19
Level up: 84% Level up: 84% Level up: 84%
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: What other central european authors do you read?

Josef Winkler (Austrian writer)



Chroale is offline   Reply With Quote
5 Thanks From:
ChildofOldLeech (12-22-2016), Doctor Dugald Eldritch (12-22-2016), Jeff Coleman (08-06-2017), miguel1984 (12-22-2016), xylokopos (01-10-2017)
Old 12-22-2016   #46
Mr. Veech's Avatar
Mr. Veech
Grimscribe
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 693
Quotes: 0
Points: 10,209, Level: 69 Points: 10,209, Level: 69 Points: 10,209, Level: 69
Level up: 87% Level up: 87% Level up: 87%
Activity: 71% Activity: 71% Activity: 71%
Re: What other central european authors do you read?

Quote Originally Posted by Acutely decayed View Post
Quote Originally Posted by qcrisp View Post
I would also highly recommend Heinrich von Kleist. Some of his short stories (I have read one volume) are among the best I have read.
I have been reading Kleist with enjoyment "Marquise of O and other stories" Greenberg translation - but just a note of warning if you are thinking of reading these - do not read the preface - even though it is by Thomas Mann first - also do not read the intro (save - these until afterward) they will describe the stories and detract from them.
What did you think of "The Foundling?"

"In a less scientific age, he would have been a devil-worshipper, a partaker in the abominations of the Black Mass; or would have given himself to the study and practice of sorcery. His was a religious soul that had failed to find good in the scheme of things; and lacking it, was impelled to make of evil itself an object of secret reverence."

~ Clark Ashton Smith, "The Devotee of Evil"
Mr. Veech is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2017   #47
Hanswurst's Avatar
Hanswurst
Mannikin
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 9
Quotes: 0
Points: 432, Level: 8 Points: 432, Level: 8 Points: 432, Level: 8
Level up: 64% Level up: 64% Level up: 64%
Activity: 14% Activity: 14% Activity: 14%
Re: What other central european authors do you read?

Quote Originally Posted by Chroale View Post
Never heard of Josef Winkler before, thanks for the tip! There are actually a lot of dark and/or weird Austrian writers. Hans Lebert, Alfred Kubin and Fritz von Herzmanowsky-Orlando for example. The morbid poems of H.C. Artmann should be mentioned, too. But i'm not shure if there are good english translations of them available.

Oooh, so Mother Nature needs a favor?! Well maybe she should have thought of that when she was besetting us with droughts and floods and poison monkeys! Nature started the fight for survival, and now she wants to quit because she’s losing. Well I say ‘hard cheese.’
(C.M. Burns)
Hanswurst is offline   Reply With Quote
4 Thanks From:
ChildofOldLeech (01-10-2017), miguel1984 (01-10-2017), xylokopos (01-10-2017), yellowish haze (01-10-2017)
Old 01-11-2017   #48
bendk's Avatar
bendk
Grimscribe
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,588
Quotes: 1
Points: 183,187, Level: 100 Points: 183,187, Level: 100 Points: 183,187, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 50% Activity: 50% Activity: 50%
Re: What other central european authors do you read?

I recently read Heinrich von Kleist's novella, Michael Kohlhaas. I thought it was outstanding. Swindled by a debauched aristocracy that claims to rule by divine right, he rises up and metes out justice of his own. The ensuing slaughter is as entertaining as it is just.

It was recently filmed (2014) as Age of Uprising: The Legend of Michael Kohlhaas. It stars Mads Mikkelsen. I'll have to hunt that down.

Last edited by bendk; 01-23-2017 at 04:35 AM..
bendk is offline   Reply With Quote
4 Thanks From:
ChildofOldLeech (01-11-2017), Druidic (07-05-2017), miguel1984 (01-11-2017), Mr. Veech (01-12-2017)
Old 01-12-2017   #49
Mr. Veech's Avatar
Mr. Veech
Grimscribe
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 693
Quotes: 0
Points: 10,209, Level: 69 Points: 10,209, Level: 69 Points: 10,209, Level: 69
Level up: 87% Level up: 87% Level up: 87%
Activity: 71% Activity: 71% Activity: 71%
Re: What other central european authors do you read?

Quote Originally Posted by bendk View Post
I recently read Heinrich von Kleist's novella, Michael Kohlhaas. I thought it was outstanding.

It was recently filmed (2014) as Age of Uprising: The Legend of Michael Kohlhaas. It stars Mads Mikkelsen. I'll have to hunt that down.
Kleist is so wonderful! I'm so obsessed with his work that I've been trying to finish a particular story which is inspired by both "The Foundling" and "The Marquise of O."

"In a less scientific age, he would have been a devil-worshipper, a partaker in the abominations of the Black Mass; or would have given himself to the study and practice of sorcery. His was a religious soul that had failed to find good in the scheme of things; and lacking it, was impelled to make of evil itself an object of secret reverence."

~ Clark Ashton Smith, "The Devotee of Evil"
Mr. Veech is offline   Reply With Quote
4 Thanks From:
bendk (01-13-2017), ChildofOldLeech (01-12-2017), Druidic (07-05-2017), miguel1984 (01-13-2017)
Old 05-23-2017   #50
xylokopos
Mystic
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 204
Quotes: 0
Points: 7,378, Level: 60 Points: 7,378, Level: 60 Points: 7,378, Level: 60
Level up: 14% Level up: 14% Level up: 14%
Activity: 7% Activity: 7% Activity: 7%
Re: What other central european authors do you read?

Not sure if this belongs here, but since the author has been mentioned a couple of times on this thread and I think some of us are always on the lookout for this sort of thing:

I just ordered Hans Henny Jahnn's The Living are Few, the Dead Many from the Book Depository. It is 57% off right now. I have no idea how long these deals last.

xylokopos is offline   Reply With Quote
2 Thanks From:
Druidic (07-05-2017), miguel1984 (05-23-2017)
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
authors, central, european, read

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Side Real Press: "The European Weird and Hanns Heinz Ewers" Gnosticangel Other News 2 05-15-2017 01:30 AM
Anyone read these authors? Robert Adam Gilmour General Discussion 3 02-01-2017 03:45 AM
Hungarian Authors Nirvana In Karma General Discussion 4 05-03-2016 08:13 AM
Thomas Ligotti and the European Fantastic Sand General Discussion 7 10-11-2015 10:46 AM
The Independent Authors Guild paeng Rants & Ravings 0 11-16-2007 12:00 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:43 PM.



Style Based on SONGS OF A DEAD DREAMER as Published by Silver Scarab Press
Design and Artwork by Harry Morris
Emulated in Hell by Dr. Bantham
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Template-Modifications by TMS