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Old 11-12-2014   #1
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Literary Criticism hermeneutics, Magnetics Metrics and Pneumatological Scholarship


Just some of what I have gathered about , the links by these authors names are all podcasts. I am to read through Paul Copp's book and I have yet to get the book by Clark Chilson.

I'll try to explain succinctly why I am looking at literature and film in this way. The Silk Roads transported a magical system utilizing prints, pillars, thresholds.. this winds up in the Bible, in Jewish dybbuk possession, as widespread as Vietnamese incantations. The way it works is through negative space, daemonic-dread (see Rudolf Otto), in Buddhism, Yoga, Shinto… I've seen it all… the way I analyze literature is unspoken, "hidden", but apparent in empathy , ominous numinosity, material culture and iconography, etc.. because the way the Silk Road worked was in spreading a magical religious culture that could be utilized without the ability to read. Oddly enough, negative space like in Lovecraft's horror fiction is also strangely literary like in Job 4 or Mark 5 in the KJV Bible. The principle texts on this are the first three below.

The Idea Of The Holy by Rudolf Otto

Dreamtime: Concerning the Boundary Between Wilderness And Civilization by Hans Peter Duerr

The Gift by Marcel Mauss

Haunting The Buddha by Robert DeCaroli

Secrecy's Power: Covert Shin Buddhists In Japan and Contradictions of Concealment by Clark Chilson see also, New phone charger doubles as face mister

The Incantatory Body by Paul Copp

Sleep Paralysis: Night-Mares, Nocebos, and the Mind-Body Connection by Shelley R. Adler

Sinister Yogis by David Gordon White

Gothic Ireland: Horror And The Irish Anglican Imagination by Jarlath Killeen

Hideous Gnosis: Black Metal Theory Symposium I by Eugene Thacker and various other people

Coleridge And the Daemonic Imagination by

Caodai Spiritism: A Study of Religion in Vietnamese Society by Victor L. Oliver

Korean Shamanism: The Cultural Paradox by Chongho Kim

Potentially based on A Voyage To Arcturus by David Lindsay or at least fun to think about it in that way,


Very useful to understand Robert DeCaroli's book on Buddhism, enlightenment is not permanent, the vital force can be given and taken away, like someone coming and stealing your blanket, because you got mad or whatever ,



Watch this, and compare with the following Vietnamese incantation,


The similarity is not a coincidence. This is an incantation that developed out of the Silk Road trading culture . There are also Korean shrine scroll paintings, that would be rolled up and unfurled used by merchants along the Silk Road so that they can worship at their home shrine without carrying the shrine with them. The shrine painting is literally a painting of their own shrine, the negative space in the centre is where they would place their ancestor's tablet. The podcast by Paul Copp talks about the use of negative space in religious worship.

Those who died beheaded
Those who had many friends and relatives but died lonely
Mandarins
Those who died in the battlefield
Those whose death nobody knew about
Students who died on the way back from an exam
Those who were buried hurriedly with no coffin and no clothing
Those who died at sea under a thunderstorm
Merchants
Those who died with a shoulder hardened by too many bamboo poles carried on it
Innocent souls who died in prison
...
All spirits in the bush, in the stream, in the shadow, underneath the bridge, outside the pagoda, in the market, in empty rice field, on the sand dune
You are cold and you are in fear
You move together, young ones holding the old
We offer you this rice porridge and fruit nectar
Do not fear
Come and receive our offering
We pray for you, we pray.

from Ghosts Of War In Vietnam by Heonik Kwon

Here's a video on Anglican communion and churchmanship. What do you think the difference between Low Church and High Church is? On the one hand, the candles are absent, on the other, in the High Church ritual the threshold is in place .

I wish this was a joke,


This is my methodology I would like suggestions of any other books. It'd be appreciated. You can see this stuff in things as culturally relevant and innocuous as the Power Rangers. but nobody wrote about it until now? There's nothing to be quiet about.

and in music,


/

I'll share one more thing, a relatively obscure Canadian poet named Sir Charles G. D. Roberts, whose genius knows no bounds..
here's Tantramar Revisited . For more information on this culture he is talking about, Shelley R. Adler's book on sleep paralysis. Very easily compared with Algernon Blackwood and Samuel Taylor Coleridge . I feel bad for Coleridge and Roberts really a lot. Elegy with a capital 'E' .

“Indeed, the vision for which the artist-hero hungers may be fraught with considerable peril, as Actaeon discovers when he is devoured by his hounds for barely glimpsing the transcendent beauty of the same goddess. If to see is so perilous, it is small wonder that the narrator of Tantramar Revisited hangs back, refusing to confront the present reality... aware of the potential futility of attempting to extend the limits of perception, that the effort to “see” may not be worth the pain... the “dim surmise” experienced in the The Skater, “indicates the first inkling of a terrifying awareness of the void just beyond the range of his increasingly disturbed perceptions. The terrified recoil and retreat in The Skater illuminates, I think, Robert's sense of uncertainty about his poetry, in which theme and structure often suggest a reluctance to engage the unknown."

- Wide Eyed In The Void: The Failure of Vision in the Poetry of Charles G. D. Roberts [100-103], G. D. Roberts Symposium

lol I might have quoted this a bit wrong but eh . Obscure criticism of an obscure but super tectonically important before the systemic attack on monarchy poet. We don't have poets with titles like Sir anymore in Canada. Canadian poetry who woulda thunk it.



And he is not a failure. Reading through criticism on Canadian poetry like Roberts splits my head with frustration he absolutely 'succeeded' and his poetry is brilliant. Shines brightly indeededly do .

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Old 11-12-2014   #2
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Re: Literary Criticism hermeneutics, Magnetics Metrics and Pneumatological Scholarshi

People killing themselves with seppuku both in my own life and in Japan , and in dire straights from being over medicated after having mystical experiences, and I have met several people like this in my time , in addition to being relatively familiar with esotericism enough to know that the.. exegesis on the nature of the soul is wrong , "you" are really a tabula rasa, entirely empty and void, souls are really them , entreated at your behest capable of being expelled provided you can directly call another free one. Memories are tied to experience which is the world, your being in that world is not even you, thus walking into and out of places disrupts your memories and who you are if you have fluctuated that. This is what David Lindsay and Harold Bloom mean by tormantic gravity and amnesia. It's not very romantic. Depressing podcast to listen to and pretty intense, the one with Clark Chilson. These matters are taken deadly seriously and ought to be taken seriously in literature if that iconography is in there I also point to Diary Of A Drugfiend by Aleister Crowley there is some Japonaism (Art Nouveau) in there as well. So anyway.. it's a good question. Where is Muspel? Are the gates reminiscent of Japan, and what does that mean for understanding David Lindsay and Harold Bloom's novel, or Crowley for that matter. Japanese Buddhism is said to be the oldest in the western world it came here first before all the others. I'm not sure if that is a fact I think I remember this right. So anyway, in addition to Art Nouveau of Japan the other significant influence on the occult back then was Vietnamese freemasonry, which.. ok here.. History And Philosophy of Cao Daism by Gabriel Gobron . Potentially where the idea for the Eye of Sauron comes from. I suspect Lord of the Rings is really about.. Cao Daism. Freemasonry mixed in with traditional Vietnamese sorcery/mediumship (can you imagine) . Interesting stuff! Do read! Enjoy.. I take this all seriously and respect it all but absolutely I have a chip on my shoulder about it because I am also aware of the damage it has caused in academia not being taken seriously at all so far. There. Yes, Cao Daism being founded in the middle 1920s. That matters. Japanese buddhism and Art nouveau influence on literature, yeah that matters right. Curious about anything people could recommend to me. Another novel recommendation.. Slave Ship by Frederik Pohl (odd book, I must find time to read that). One more book recommendation.. Cao Dai Kung Fu by Haha Lung, he's also the author of many numerous books on mind control and ninjas . . . I have my reasons , to say, what I say.


from A Voyage To Arcturus , I recommend the book by Paul Copp and Robert DeCaroli in particular

Maskull and Sullenbode sat down on a boulder, facing the open country. The moon was directly behind them, high up. It was almost as light as an Earth day.
"Tonight is like life," said Sullenbode.
"How so?"
"So lovely above and around us, so foul underfoot."
Maskull sighed. "Poor girl, you are unhappy."
"And you—are you happy?"
He thought a while, and then replied—"No. No, I'm not happy. Love is not happiness."
"What is it, Maskull?"
"Restlessness—unshed tears—thoughts too grand for our soul to think..."
"Yes," said Sullenbode.
After a time she asked, "Why were we created, just to live for a few years and then disappear?"
"We are told that we shall live again."
"Yes, Maskull?"
"Perhaps in Muspel," he added thoughtfully.
"What kind of life will that be?"
"Surely we shall meet again. Love is too wonderful and mysterious a thing to remain uncompleted."
She gave a slight shiver, and turned away from him. "This dream is untrue. Love is completed here."
"How can that be, when sooner or later it is brutally interrupted by Fate?"
"It is completed by anguish.... Oh, why must it always be enjoyment for us? Can't we suffer—can't we go on suffering, forever and ever? Maskull, until love crushes our spirit, finally and without remedy, we don't begin to feel ourselves."
Maskull gazed at her with a troubled expression. "Can the memory of love be worth more than its presence and reality?"
"You don't understand. Those pangs are more precious than all the rest beside." She caught at him. "Oh, if you could only see inside my mind, Maskull! You would see strange things.... I can't explain. It is all confused, even to myself.... This love is quite different from what I thought."
He sighed again. "Love is a strong drink. Perhaps it is too strong for human beings. And I think that it overtures our reason in different ways."
They remained sitting side by side, staring straight before them with unseeing eyes.
"It doesn't matter," said Sullenbode at last, with a smile, getting up. "Soon it will be ended, one way or another. Come, let us be off!"
Maskull too got up.
"Where's Corpang?" he asked listlessly.
They both looked across the ridge in the direction of Adage. At the point where they stood it was nearly a mile wide. It sloped perceptibly toward the southern edge, giving all the earth the appearance of a heavy list. Toward the west the ground continued level for a thousand yards, but then a high, sloping, grassy hill went right across the ridge from side to side, like a vast billow on the verge of breaking. It shut out all further view beyond. The whole crest of this hill, from one end to the other, was crowned by a long row of enormous stone posts, shining brightly in the moonlight against a background of dark sky. There were about thirty in all, and they were placed at such regular intervals that there was little doubt that they had been set there by human hands. Some were perpendicular, but others dipped so much that an aspect of extreme antiquity was given to the entire colonnade. Corpang was seen climbing the hill, not far from the top.
"He wishes to arrive," said Maskull, watching the energetic ascent with a rather cynical smile.
"The heavens won't open for Corpang," returned Sullenbode. "He need not be in such a hurry.... What do these pillars seem like to you?"
"They might be the entrance to some mighty temple. Who can have planted them there?"
She did not answer. They watched Corpang gain the summit of the hill, and disappear through the line of posts.
Maskull turned again to Sullenbode. "Now we two are alone in a lonely world."
She regarded him steadily. "Our last night on this earth must be a grand one. I am ready to go on."
"I don't think you are fit to go on. It will be better to go down the pass a little, and find shelter."
She half smiled. "We won't study our poor bodies tonight. I mean you to go to Adage, Maskull."
"Then at all events let us rest first, for it must be a long, terrible climb, and who knows what hardships we shall meet?"
She walked a step or two forward, half turned, and held out her hand to him. "Come, Maskull!"
When they had covered half the distance that separated them from the foot of the hill, Maskull heard the drum taps. They came from behind the hill, and were loud, sharp, almost explosive. He glanced at Sullenbode, but she appeared to hear nothing. A minute later the whole sky behind and above the long chain of stone posts on the crest of the hill began to be illuminated by a strange radiance. The moonlight in that quarter faded; the posts stood out black on a background of fire. It was the light of Muspel. As the moments passed, it grew more and more vivid, peculiar, and awful. It was of no colour, and resembled nothing—it was supernatural and indescribable. Maskull's spirit swelled. He stood fast, with expanded nostrils and terrible eyes.
Sullenbode touched him lightly.
"What do you see, Maskull?"
"Muspel-light."
"I see nothing."
The light shot up, until Maskull scarcely knew where he stood. It burned with a fiercer and stranger glare than ever before. He forgot the existence of Sullenbode. The drum beats grew deafeningly loud. Each beat was like a rip of startling thunder, crashing through the sky and making the air tremble. Presently the crashes coalesced, and one continuous roar of thunder rocked the world. But the rhythm persisted—the four beats, with the third accented, still came pulsing through the atmosphere, only now against a background of thunder, and not of silence.
Maskull's heart beat wildly. His body was like a prison. He longed to throw it off, to spring up and become incorporated with the sublime universe which was beginning to unveil itself.
Sullenbode suddenly enfolded him in her arms, and kissed him—passionately, again and again. He made no response; he was unaware of what she was doing. She unclasped him and, with bent head and streaming eyes, went noiselessly away. She started to go back toward the Mornstab Pass.
A few minutes afterward the radiance began to fade. The thunder died down. The moonlight reappeared, the stone posts and the hillside were again bright. In a short time the supernatural light had entirely vanished, but the drum taps still sounded faintly, a muffled rhythm, from behind the hill. Maskull started violently, and stared around him like a suddenly awakened sleeper.
He saw Sullenbode walking slowly away from him, a few hundred yards off. At that sight, death entered his heart. He ran after her, calling out.... She did not look around. When he had lessened the distance between them by a half, he saw her suddenly stumble and fall. She did not get up again, but lay motionless where she fell.
He flew toward her, and bent over her body. His worst fears were realised. Life had departed.
Beneath its coating of mud, her face bore the vulgar, ghastly Crystalman grin, but Maskull saw nothing of it. She had never appeared so beautiful to him as at that moment.
He remained beside her for a long time, on his knees. He wept—but, between his fits of weeping, he raised his head from time to time, and listened to the distant drum beats.
An hour passed—two hours. Teargeld was now in the south-west. Maskull lifted Sullenbode's dead body on to his shoulders, and started to walk toward the Pass. He cared no more for Muspel. He intended to look for water in which to wash the corpse of his beloved, and earth in which to bury her.
When he had reached the boulder overlooking the landslip, on which they had sat together, he lowered his burden, and, placing the dead girl on the stone, seated himself beside her for a time, gazing over toward Barey.
After that, he commenced his descent of the Mornstab Pass.

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Old 11-12-2014   #3
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Re: Literary Criticism hermeneutics, Magnetics Metrics and Pneumatological Scholarshi

Tolkien was a pretty average Roman Catholic. The Lord of the Rings is steeped in very traditional Catholic symbolism and themes. Suffering, death and resurrection face most of the main characters. Daoism and/or Freemasonry would have been repugnant to Tolkien. If you want to get an understanding of the Catholic contemplative tradition I would suggest Fr. Thomas Merton. Most of his books are in print and published by New Directions Publishing. He was a student of Eastern Religions and was very well grounded in the long Catholic tradition. it permeates much of his work I forget the exact title but he wrote a great work about the Desert Fathers, and his New Seeds Of Contemplation is full of fascinating thoughts.
I am still catching up with your last string of posts. It will take me a while to truly understand, but I see more of the common thread in many of the references you made above.

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Old 11-12-2014   #4
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Re: Literary Criticism hermeneutics, Magnetics Metrics and Pneumatological Scholarshi

the idea of the Tabula Rasa and the concept of a voyage on a ship without a captain , changing out your one man crew, got me thinking about negative space again and personification of negative space , which would be an empty shell, and the uncanny. the closest thing I could think of in relation to Japan and memory was the new Disney Tron film , with the Daft Punk soundtrack


sorry to make a third post in a row I don't want to constantly edit the thread this is another thought stream. There is relevance here that I think is interesting . Normally when we think of negative space we do correlate to personification. I imagine the shaman and the idea of being a tabula rasa like being a Tron machine.

Throw out some recommended reads. Dreamtime is rad. I would prefer works of theory such as that and the writing of Eugene Thacker.
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Old 11-12-2014   #5
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Re: Literary Criticism hermeneutics, Magnetics Metrics and Pneumatological Scholarshi

Quote Originally Posted by Mr. D. View Post
Tolkien was a pretty average Roman Catholic. The Lord of the Rings is steeped in very traditional Catholic symbolism and themes. Suffering, death and resurrection face most of the main characters. Daoism and/or Freemasonry would have been repugnant to Tolkien. If you want to get an understanding of the Catholic contemplative tradition I would suggest Fr. Thomas Merton. Most of his books are in print and published by New Directions Publishing. He was a student of Eastern Religions and was very well grounded in the long Catholic tradition. it permeates much of his work I forget the exact title but he wrote a great work about the Desert Fathers, and his New Seeds Of Contemplation is full of fascinating thoughts.
I am still catching up with your last string of posts. It will take me a while to truly understand, but I see more of the common thread in many of the references you made above.
Thanks .

The manner of freemasonry by Vietnamese mediums would have been distressing to conventional ideas of freemasonry , to understand Cao Daism you have to understand that it was transnational and connected to the theosophical movements , Golden Dawn, leading up to world war 2, since it involves ideas of Taoist immortals , and with influence from Japanese alliance against the French the combat specialist training would have been at the highest levels in terms of ideas to do with assaulting other human bodies for intelligence gathering. This is what they believed. Their persistence goes several steps beyond what westerners are familiar with of ritual magic. This is really a religion systemically set up to enable hagging. I can't imagine someone like Tolkien and other English authors not noticing a Vietnamese freemasonic society amongst early 20th century mystical groups.

It's freemasonic symbols taken to their most extreme uses . This film is useful, Mic Jagger sued for likeness, he must have been unsatisfied with the film in some way. Amazing and Canadian film btw and I recommend strongly a read of James De Mille's Copper Cylinder Manuscript . This is actually the Canadiana I would yearn to recover throughout religions like Anglicanism but I can imagine the difficulty that would be considering the nature of how the body is ritually abjected .


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Re: Literary Criticism hermeneutics, Magnetics Metrics and Pneumatological Scholarshi


I've studied daemonic-dread, and the self loss, my original foray into this was really I had encountered people and learned by myself, because I had seen the Self-Loss, and the use of negative space, in a Korean film, that happened to play a gag on a favourite author of mine, Whitley Strieber, the film is Save The Green Planet!, and other Korean television shows have been explicit about all of this, particularly their anthropology, which many years later I have since imported.

This is my working problem. I am on the outside of Catholicism, Anglicanism, and Christianity, while I have studied the shamanic influences in Christanity, and purportedly the origins of Manichaeism. I was born in 1985 , grew up in the Satanic Panic, now I have seen the unmentionables of Christianity and I want in . But I know the unmentionables. So this is the problem with generation x, we were cast out for being demonic and unwanted, within a religious competitive marketplace, now religions are in reconstruction mode, how they pitch that determines the future of Christianity.
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Re: Literary Criticism hermeneutics, Magnetics Metrics and Pneumatological Scholarshi

the Anglican church does outreach with First Nations people of Canada, and shamanism, but from what I know of wendigo psychosis, it would be clear to me and I grit my teeth when I say this and speak out of the corner of my mouth that.. the first nations people kill shamans. That's what they historically did, fearing cannibalism. There were many tribes who didn't. The kind of shamanism well represented in Korean media is really the Wendigo like in the Algernon Blackwood story. So. When I think of Anglican interest in shamanism , and first nations outreach, I can't help thinking -- what kind of shamanism do they really know. The Shin cults are really about this. Why are they secret? Why does shamanism survive in S.Korea but no easily in Japan? in S.Korea, shamanism according to Chongho Kim survives because the shaman there is the abject, a haunted house, and proficient in black magic. Through that capability also comes the ability to absorb and specialize in misfortune and what they call Han. This ability to violently affect catharsis is the shaman's power, which relies upon spirit communion, alchemy, but the shaman is not these things, and they die to achieve this. I'll say this again, S.Korea is the most successfully Christianized country in the modern world, because of their proficiency in both shamanism and Manichaeism (yet to be discovered, but I am pretty sure this is the case). Why are they so confident to accept Christianity.. their theology is a trinity, and the cross-potent is a symbol of Wuism, which is their religion. This is what Koreans really believe. Now, this shamanism is also Christian, so in that case.. what is Anglicanism to Generation X ? I recommend also reading Luther's confessions on grace and forgiveness , and the Holy Spirit, in the Book of Concord.



The book by Chongho Kim is extremely good. Besides that he overviews initiation and calling the descent of spirits through the temporal distortion of daemonic-dread, he underscores a lot of the oversights in the new age community from a Korean point of view on shamanism which he calls sorcery (and their perspective includes alchemy) from an indigenously pessimistic perspective. His argument is that typically western notions of shamanism is not a Korean one, and he rips apart the scholarship by some american anthropologists who romanticize the korean shaman tradition. Instead, he presents a view of korean shamans much like many of the other books I have cited as an underclass specializing in death, and the severe impurity that that represents. The shaman is not a symbol of life but a symbol of death. I think this is important potentially for understanding what Christ is as a symbol. The shaman does not undergo a loss only to live again but they undergo a loss never to live again. There's a profound difference with that view, which becomes apparent in English horror fiction. The shaman in Korea have all of the abilities you will find in a culture of practitioners such as reiki (which originates in Shin cults), but the shaman is kept out of healthcare services, not out of discrimination, but because it is simply not their role in society to be that. They really have a different role than anything else I've ever read. If you believe and this is what I really believe that weird supernatural horror is firmly within the English high poetic tradition of Elegy, than this kind of scholarship I am looking for and drawing together is the anthropology or theology or philosophy of Elegy . So the shaman as a wendigo , this is shown to be in the elegiac tradition, as Beowulf or Rime of the Ancient Mariner are, but many ideas of shamans are not in that literary genre. This is the difficulty with what I do as someone who is a fan of horror and Lovecraft is that logical correlative between mysterium tremendum et fascinans . And, I just want to continue these religious studies in English , and Christian culture, but that seems to be impossible. Jarlath Killeen's book was quite a boon, but it made me scratch my head particularly as someone from Generation X.


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Re: Literary Criticism hermeneutics, Magnetics Metrics and Pneumatological Scholarshi


I know the point of no return and the rubicon has been crossed. I have heard that freemasonry , and I mean regular freemasonry with not a lot of young people in there anymore at all , is not typically able to result in Wendigo psychosis as Korean shaman initiation and Vietnamese mediumship is meant to, because they don't use the threshold in the same way as they do in Japan or other cultural contexts. My other frustrating issue for any interest that I have in religion is that and I need to have these interests to understand literature at all right is that typically the laying on of hands is only thought of in one direction that is down well, the point of the Self Loss and the kangshinmu is that lineage can come from the polar end which would be from bottom up, and the shaman is the lowest class , this is a point of pride that they can hit the very ceiling, and this is all about polarity , from the other direction entirely. Pole reversal. That is why Rudolf Otto is a genius. If this is all indeed the case and I have my ducks lined up in a row, Anglicanism is like what. What Christian religions are like this and are they aware ? The most important thing being that this kind of shaman, to lose themselves, and to be seats for the spirits to sit upon, is really an abjection, and the ultimate pessimism. Nobody wants to do this. So this is nature's ultimate balancing act . The shaman is not the Wendigo, and the Wendigo is not the shaman. Tabula Rasa. Ego-Death.


When Chongho Kim uses the word sorcerer, and differentiates from the word shaman, he is correcting the error also that a shaman is someone who uses trance in order to travel to an other world . An autistic naturally stims and is proficient to go in and out of trance on a regular basis, they don't need to drum themselves into this, and in any case the drum that a shaman uses or any means of trance is a technique of meditation and concentration , which has no relation to how they initiate or how they become possessed. The shaman in a Korean context undergoes an initiation and rite of possession, then they're possessed, the trance is a different thing.




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Re: Literary Criticism hermeneutics, Magnetics Metrics and Pneumatological Scholarshi

Saruman and Frodo are both anti-heroes with the same sorcery . Sauron is a realization of God , as a We , awful and tremendous . Gandalf is not a wizard , he's just Christian apologetics. Saruman, the Uruk Hai and Frodo make for the strongest Christ allegories in the film.

but this is not the way Catholicism is taught , so generation X goes and chooses other religions .
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Re: Literary Criticism hermeneutics, Magnetics Metrics and Pneumatological Scholarshi

Saruman is a villain. He does evil when he could have done good. Frodo is a hero. What he does is heroic. Sauron is a literary device as much as anything else. He is based on Milton's Lucifer in "Paradise Lost" filtered through Tolkien's WW1 experiences. Where Sauron is a fallen angel Gandalf is a loyal angel. These ideas are best explicated in the Silmarilian. It shows how Tolkien created what is essentially a Christian myth.

"A Mad World, MY Masters"
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