THE NIGHTMARE NETWORK
Go Back   THE NIGHTMARE NETWORK > Discussion & Interpretation > Other Authors > General Discussion
Home Forums Content Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Contagion Members Media Diversion Info Register
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes Translate
Old 08-18-2009   #21
Bleak&Icy's Avatar
Bleak&Icy
Grimscribe
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 811
Quotes: 0
Points: 41,621, Level: 100 Points: 41,621, Level: 100 Points: 41,621, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: Madness in Literature

A brilliant account of madness, by a Persian novelist heavily influenced by Poe:


"Reality is the shadow of the word." -- Bruno Schulz

Last edited by BleakИ 04-26-2011 at 11:25 PM..
Bleak&Icy is offline   Reply With Quote
7 Thanks From:
Daisy (08-18-2009), G. S. Carnivals (08-18-2009), gveranon (08-18-2009), maramadus (1 Week Ago), Nicole Cushing (03-03-2014), paeng (08-21-2009), Spotbowserfido2 (08-19-2009)
Old 08-18-2009   #22
Russell Nash
Grimscribe
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 935
Quotes: 0
Re: Madness in Literature

Two cases that I forgot are: Vincent Van Gogh, and John Forbes Nash Jr. (A Beautiful Mind, a film based on his life). However, how many paintings did Van Gogh paint when he was totally mad? Are they really good ones? I know, art is a relative thing, but if one compares his first paintings to his last ones, which ones are better? The second case, Forbes Nash, is more intriguing, a person affected by schizophrenia is truly mad? I ask so many questions, because I don't know. I wish to know, but who am I (not having a degree on this field) to judge whether or not someone is mad?

I live close to a mental hospital, about 10 blocks from it, and sometimes I just stop (more times than it is advisable) at the corner to watch people coming in and going out from the hospital, or wandering about. Believe me, some of this people are "mad". They don't look like rara avis but like madmen. It's very depressing to see people, fellowmen, that are suffering from that mental disorder, madness, or whatever it is. Often I like to walk the streets at night, for pleasure, and the other night I saw a guy (looked normal to me) getting across the sidewalks in a zigzagging way. On the same street, he crossed several times, from one sidewalk to the other and then babbled something, and back to the other sidewalk. Was he a madman? Did he have an outré behavior? ...?

I know who you are
Russell Nash is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanks From:
G. S. Carnivals (08-18-2009)
Old 08-18-2009   #23
G. S. Carnivals's Avatar
G. S. Carnivals
Our Temporary Supervisor
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 26,613
Quotes: 397
Points: 272,439, Level: 100 Points: 272,439, Level: 100 Points: 272,439, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 100% Activity: 100% Activity: 100%
Re: Madness in Literature

Thanks, Jeff. I am torn in two directions on this one. My father suffered from mental illness when I was younger. Wanting to consciously experience madness is like wanting to experience LSD. What lies ahead?

"What does it mean to be alive except to court disaster and suffering at every moment?"

Tibet: Carnivals?
Ligotti: Ceremonies for initiating children into the cult of the sinister.
Tibet: Gas stations?
Ligotti: Nothing to say about gas stations as such, although I've always responded to the smell of gasoline as if it were a kind of perfume.
G. S. Carnivals is offline   Reply With Quote
2 Thanks From:
Jeff Coleman (08-18-2009), Russell Nash (08-18-2009)
Old 08-18-2009   #24
Russell Nash
Grimscribe
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 935
Quotes: 0
Re: Madness in Literature

One more thing, Anthony Hopkins in Hannibal, was Hopkins mad? Or is he a good actor imitating a madman? I think it is the second option. The same with literature, many good writers speak about horror but no one wants to live in a concentration camp. And many discuss or write about madness, although no one wants to experience what madness really is. Writers are good imitators, but that's it, no true madness, no true horror. True horror and true madness may not be found in literature. But what do I know...?

I know who you are
Russell Nash is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanks From:
Jeff Coleman (08-18-2009)
Old 04-25-2011   #25
UG Swoons's Avatar
UG Swoons
Mannikin
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 12
Quotes: 0
Points: 4,977, Level: 48 Points: 4,977, Level: 48 Points: 4,977, Level: 48
Level up: 14% Level up: 14% Level up: 14%
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: Madness in Literature

Quote Originally Posted by Mr. D. View Post
Another major writer that no one has mentioned is Ryunosuke Akutagawa. His two stories, "In a Grove" and Rashamon" were used as the basis of the film also entitled "Rashamon." His mother went insane when he was a child and his father wasn't much help. Dad was a very flighty person so Ryunosuke was raised by his uncle's family.
He was unstable his whole life and suffered serious emotional problems during his last years. All of his works are unusual and his later works explore his mental problems. he eventually committed suicide at the age of 35. (I think)
The core of his work is a sense of cynicism and despair that became more pronounced the older he got. He was savage in his alanysis of Japanese life. (And all life, no doubt.) Needless to say, he is one of my favorite authors.
Indeed. His last work, Spinning Gears, written shortly before he killed himself, is almost like an extended suicide note. Very powerful and disturbing in its intensity of despair.

The link below summarises the tale better than I could:

http://muslin.wordpress.com/2007/07/...uke-akutagawa/
UG Swoons is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2011   #26
DoktorH's Avatar
DoktorH
Grimscribe
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 724
Quotes: 0
Points: 16,436, Level: 88 Points: 16,436, Level: 88 Points: 16,436, Level: 88
Level up: 54% Level up: 54% Level up: 54%
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: Madness in Literature

One work I'd like to add to the madness-inspired/influenced literary list: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. Inspired by Ken Kesey's work on the night shift at a VA hospital while experimenting with psychoative drugs (in one of the studies back before they were banned), it could be seen as a view of what a larger society regards as madness from the perspective of chemically-induced madness.
DoktorH is offline   Reply With Quote
3 Thanks From:
bendk (04-26-2011), G. S. Carnivals (04-27-2011), Spotbowserfido2 (04-26-2011)
Old 04-26-2011   #27
bendk's Avatar
bendk
Grimscribe
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,611
Quotes: 1
Points: 188,529, Level: 100 Points: 188,529, Level: 100 Points: 188,529, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 29% Activity: 29% Activity: 29%
Re: Madness in Literature

Quote Originally Posted by DoktorH View Post
One work I'd like to add to the madness-inspired/influenced literary list: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. Inspired by Ken Kesey's work on the night shift at a VA hospital while experimenting with psychoative drugs (in one of the studies back before they were banned), it could be seen as a view of what a larger society regards as madness from the perspective of chemically-induced madness.
An excellent novel. For some reason - possibly due to the times in which it was written or Kesey's off the wall lifestyle - I was expecting a more experimental novel. It isn't. The prose is wonderful. And it is a great story, of course.
bendk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2011   #28
DoktorH's Avatar
DoktorH
Grimscribe
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 724
Quotes: 0
Points: 16,436, Level: 88 Points: 16,436, Level: 88 Points: 16,436, Level: 88
Level up: 54% Level up: 54% Level up: 54%
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: Madness in Literature

Quote Originally Posted by bendk View Post
An excellent novel. For some reason - possibly due to the times in which it was written or Kesey's off the wall lifestyle - I was expecting a more experimental novel. It isn't. The prose is wonderful. And it is a great story, of course.
I'm glad it wasn't experimental. The prose as it stands shows that madness, or what society calls madness at the least, isn't that far removed from what it calls normal.
DoktorH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2011   #29
Gray House's Avatar
Gray House
Chymist
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 392
Quotes: 0
Points: 9,366, Level: 67 Points: 9,366, Level: 67 Points: 9,366, Level: 67
Level up: 6% Level up: 6% Level up: 6%
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: Madness in Literature

Anyone read I Hear Voices, by Paul Ableman? It is in my "to-read pile" but is in danger of drowning (that pile keeps growing). The description that usually accompanies it online says it was "perhaps inspirational to Ken Kesey". Ramsey Campbell has said it "is a brilliant immersion in the experience of a schizophrenic"; and he should know (see the afterword to The Face That Must Die, and "Near Madness" in Ramsey Campbell, Probably).
Gray House is offline   Reply With Quote
2 Thanks From:
G. S. Carnivals (04-28-2011), Spotbowserfido2 (04-27-2011)
Old 04-30-2011   #30
Judge Holden's Avatar
Judge Holden
Acolyte
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 75
Quotes: 0
Points: 4,455, Level: 45 Points: 4,455, Level: 45 Points: 4,455, Level: 45
Level up: 37% Level up: 37% Level up: 37%
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: Madness in Literature

An interesting companion piece to Kesey's novel would be The Three Christs of Ypsilanti by Milton Rokeach, recently reprinted by New York Review of Books Classics. Rokeach's experiment on which the book was based ran roughly contemporaneously with the Kesey's composition of his novel - so it is doubtful he was influenced by Rokeach's two year experiment.

Rokeach had the brilliant idea of bringing together three psychotics with the identical delusion that they were Jesus Christ. It is at the same time hilarious funny and as lacking in all ethics as McMurphy's lobotomy in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. The books greatest virtue is when the patients are allowed to speak for themselves (Rokeach taped them for two years).
Judge Holden is offline   Reply With Quote
4 Thanks From:
bendk (04-30-2011), DoktorH (04-30-2011), G. S. Carnivals (04-30-2011), Spotbowserfido2 (04-30-2011)
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
literature, madness

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
At the Mountains of Madness paeng Lovecraftian Films 6 01-25-2009 01:04 PM
At the Mountains of Madness Malone H. P. Lovecraft 4 01-06-2009 02:24 PM
Only One More Madness Among Many G. S. Carnivals "Masquerade of a Dead Sword" 0 10-14-2008 09:03 PM
The Voice Of Madness G. S. Carnivals "Teatro Grottesco" 0 06-17-2006 07:37 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:51 PM.



Style Based on SONGS OF A DEAD DREAMER as Published by Silver Scarab Press
Design and Artwork by Harry Morris
Emulated in Hell by Dr. Bantham
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Template-Modifications by TMS