THE NIGHTMARE NETWORK
Go Back   THE NIGHTMARE NETWORK > Discussion & Interpretation > Other Authors > D. F. Lewis
Home Forums Content Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Contagion Members Media Diversion Info Register
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes Translate
Old 10-02-2007   #21
Nemonymous's Avatar
Nemonymous
Grimscribe
Threadstarter
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 4,491
Quotes: 0
Points: 145,689, Level: 100 Points: 145,689, Level: 100 Points: 145,689, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 99% Activity: 99% Activity: 99%
Re: The Launch of Megazanthus Press

http://eclipticplane.blogspot.com/20...re-review.html
Another detailed review of Zencore!

MY WEBSITE: www.nemonymous.com
Nemonymous is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2007   #22
Calenture's Avatar
Calenture
Mystic
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 126
Quotes: 0
Points: 10,025, Level: 69 Points: 10,025, Level: 69 Points: 10,025, Level: 69
Level up: 25% Level up: 25% Level up: 25%
Activity: 7% Activity: 7% Activity: 7%
Re: The Launch of Megazanthus Press

Mary’s Gift, the Stars and Frank’s Pisser: Mary and Frank are a homeless couple. While she lies in the filth next to Frank, Mary likes looking up at the stars. She knows them all by name: "the Shoplifter’s Elbow on the rise to the east, Mad Alf’s Pigeons almost overhead, the snaking Frank’s Pisser to the south."

Mary’s very possessive and protective of her stars. And also of Frank’s Pisser, which she likes to ride while looking up at them.

This one’s written with a brutal honesty, and for me, this is another argument in favour of smaller future Zencore volumes. There are a number of worthy stories here, but as I’ve said, not all are easy reading so that what should be a pleasurable reading experience becomes an endurance test. My own reading tends to be done with notebook to hand, a stack of new and old anthologies half-read, half-written-up beside me and maybe a half-read novel to fall asleep over last thing. I’d say that my attitude towards reading most stories these days is similar to that of a student swotting for an exam. This is probably not what the authors or Editor Des Lewis had in mind as their ideal reader when they penned their stories. It’s certainly not how I used to read and probably explains why I actually finish so few books now.

Anyway, the story of Mary, one of life’s victims, channelling the energy of a distant star for her abusive love is one of the least palatable and best stories in the book.

Steven Pirie wrote:
Quote
As to whether my story is up there yet, or what the verdict may or may not be...
Every reader will create their own experience with Zencore as with all stories, and any verdict must be a private one - which is why this thread has become a bit of a confessional for me and any arguing has been with myself. Anyway, time to write-up the last few...

Blue Rasberries was the title of an old pamphlet which the narrator found hidden on top of his father’s bookcase as a child. Ostensibly a pornographic magazine, it told the story of how someone had infiltrated a nudist colony and manipulated it until he became its leader, forcing the members to perform humiliating rites and wear "heavy military uniforms that are the antithesis of the nudity they originally practised and which made them happy."

Now, convinced years after the book itself has disappeared that the text it contained was somehow viral, self-replicating and continuing to affect those who read it – not unlike one of those mythical rock albums with a sinister message coded into it – he determines to contact the book’s author and find others like himself who have been changed by it. This one struck me as being clever where I'd have preferred it to be funny. (Maybe I should add that the stuff which usually gets me laughing is Tom Sharpe or Terry Pratchett, whereas this seems "knowing" but not very slapstick!)

Berian Winslow & The Stream of Consciousness Storyteller: Close to Christmas, the narrator is looking around the shops when he sees a group of children surrounding a seated figure reading from a large book. After a while, it occurs to him that the figure is actually a cleverly disguised automaton, and then that the story it’s telling has its audience apparently gripped in a spell.

I was put off reading this story for a while by the name ‘Henry Tumblegoat’ in the first line - such unfortunate character names should be discouraged as dangerous, I believe. And once I’d screwed my courage to the sticking point and got past that name, the conversational nature of the narrative with anecdotes about automated donkeys didn’t help. But once properly into the story, I found there was something genuinely original and entertaining here. Readers of Philip K Dick would almost certainly appreciate this one.

The Plunge: Frank is working at snapping the necks of children before sending their bodies into the furnace. Like any factory job, it’s tedious, and any lapse of concentration can lead to embarrassingly botched work. It gives Frank plenty of time to think about his wife who wants to go somewhere where children are liked.

This very short piece succeeds in creating a believable portrait of Frank and also a quite memorable and transcendent ending.

I’ve read England and Nowhere once, and now I’m reading it again. Somewhere on the Cornish coast, a man watches a young couple exploring the land by the sea and each other. And there’s a sense that he’s watching a part of his own past. Perhaps they are in his past? Beautifully written, it’s evocative yet seems abstract, the spaces around a story?

Jim Stratton synopsised it thus: ""England And Nowhere" is a slice out of the life of an old, alcoholic man as he diverts himself watching the people around him between martinis at the beach resort hotel where he lives. And so his days go, living other peoples lives secondhand from his balcony, martini glass in hand."

This one frustrates me because I won’t be able to work it out satisfactorily tonight, I have the feeling there’s more to it – yet it feels time to bring this writing to some sort of end. Perhaps that’s a good way of describing any good piece of writing, a feeling that there’s more...

Word Doctor is the last story. I’ve said that what seems to unite the writers in Zencore is a love of words – sometimes at cost to the story. "Word Doctor" is a last song - or hymn - to words themselves, how they change, mutate, and how their origins can be found so that they can be restored or mended. Or how they can mend us. Of course it had to be the last story here.

I like to finish with a list of personal favourites. This part hasn't been posted elsewhere yet, as it looked a little too belated if not - I hope - redundant.

Brendan Connell has posted a key to his colour-coded reviews
http://brendanconnell.wordpress.com/...core-unveiled/

The four stories that begin Zencore: Torsion, MMM – Delicious, Undergrowth and Fugly are strong stories, real winners, accessible and highly readable. The Coughing Coffin does borrow a style from an earlier time (I wouldn’t say it was Jamesian), but it also spoofs that syle entertainingly, and that worked for me.

And England and Nowhere is certainly very finely written and beautifully evokes its Cornish coast setting. I know that coastline. There are at least five other stories that I found interesting and entertaining, and there’s Terminus, which, though too densely written for my taste, remains weirdly – even uniquely - fascinating.

Looking at some of the earlier Nemonymous volumes, they have as many stories as Zencore – but about half as many pages. Wordiness is sometimes a problem with this volume. Designer Andy Cox is also missed. Whether it’s possible to compare Zencore with anything but its own predecessors is doubtful. Clearly it is in a class of its own.

Some of the writing is perhaps too clever for its own good; but possibly it was just too clever for me? This is why I consciously stressed the difficulties I was having with some stories. I do have occasional difficulty concentrating, these days – which might be due just to the ridiculous time I wake up, or... who knows what else? Maybe I should just try fish oil capsules! At any rate, this is how Zencore was read by a person with erratic concentration. For the six stories listed above, I’m very glad that I’ve read this volume. Now, Des, I’m definitely out of here.

Until the next one, probably!

Rog

You can get Zencore here.

Last edited by Calenture; 10-04-2007 at 10:42 AM..
Calenture is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2007   #23
Nemonymous's Avatar
Nemonymous
Grimscribe
Threadstarter
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 4,491
Quotes: 0
Points: 145,689, Level: 100 Points: 145,689, Level: 100 Points: 145,689, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 99% Activity: 99% Activity: 99%
Re: The Launch of Megazanthus Press

Quote Originally Posted by Calenture View Post
Now, Des, I’m definitely out of here.
I am extremely grateful, Rog, for that 'rite of review'.
des

MY WEBSITE: www.nemonymous.com
Nemonymous is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2007   #24
Nemonymous's Avatar
Nemonymous
Grimscribe
Threadstarter
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 4,491
Quotes: 0
Points: 145,689, Level: 100 Points: 145,689, Level: 100 Points: 145,689, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 99% Activity: 99% Activity: 99%
Re: The Launch of Megazanthus Press

Cone Zero Anthology submission guidelines linked from here:

http://weirdmonger.livejournal.com/88231.html

Paying Market

MY WEBSITE: www.nemonymous.com
Nemonymous is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2007   #25
Nemonymous's Avatar
Nemonymous
Grimscribe
Threadstarter
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 4,491
Quotes: 0
Points: 145,689, Level: 100 Points: 145,689, Level: 100 Points: 145,689, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 99% Activity: 99% Activity: 99%
Re: The Launch of Megazanthus Press

(1) There's a review of <<Zencore!>> in Dead Reckonings magazine.
Not sure what it says yet!

(2) On 9th Decenber 2007, I shall be setting up a 'spoiler' webpage to
assign the 17 Zencore stories to their authors, a page you may want to
do without if you've not yet read <<Zencore!>> (recommended for a
Stoker and with seven YBF&H Honourable Mentions).
So you only have until then to take advantage of this free competition
offering a reasonable prize.

Sorry I haven't been visiting TLO lately. Been lots of personal problems etc.

MY WEBSITE: www.nemonymous.com
Nemonymous is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2007   #26
gveranon's Avatar
gveranon
Grimscribe
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,127
Quotes: 0
Points: 28,181, Level: 100 Points: 28,181, Level: 100 Points: 28,181, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 33% Activity: 33% Activity: 33%
Re: The Launch of Megazanthus Press

After reading Calenture’s comments about “Terminus” earlier in this thread, I decided to check it out for myself. I’ll be very surprised if Thomas Ligotti isn’t the author of this story. (Hey, if I’m wrong, I might as well be confidently and publicly wrong!)

I found the writing style to be far more readable and engaging than Calenture did, but the story as a whole left me somewhat puzzled, specifically as to how some of the elements and events of the story relate to each other. I think I get it, but I’m not sure. Of the Ligotti stories I’ve read (about half of them), only “Purity” is as puzzling to me as this one is.

This is not meant as a negative criticism. Both stories seem to be deep, dream-like allegorical tangles which are all the more powerful for the way their meanings are suggested and evoked rather than spelled out. I’m reminded a little bit of Flannery O’Connor’s strange, difficult, sharp-edged stories. Ligotti is every bit as good a short-story writer as she was, in his own very different way.
gveranon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2007   #27
Nemonymous's Avatar
Nemonymous
Grimscribe
Threadstarter
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 4,491
Quotes: 0
Points: 145,689, Level: 100 Points: 145,689, Level: 100 Points: 145,689, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 99% Activity: 99% Activity: 99%
Re: The Launch of Megazanthus Press

Thanks, GV. That's a most interesting guess! BTW...



I expect everyone is itching to enter this valuable free competition; it will soon be too late to do so.
http://weirdmonger.blogspot.com/2007...mpetition.html

MY WEBSITE: www.nemonymous.com
Nemonymous is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2007   #28
yellowish haze's Avatar
yellowish haze
Grimscribe
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,261
Quotes: 0
Points: 59,678, Level: 100 Points: 59,678, Level: 100 Points: 59,678, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 17% Activity: 17% Activity: 17%
Re: The Launch of Megazanthus Press

Hello, Des.
I'm planning enter the competition by Thursday! Still pondering on how to place these names in the right order...

"In my imagination, I have a small apartment in a small town where I live alone and gaze through a window at a wintry landscape." -- TL
Confusio Linguarum - visionary literature, translingualism & bibliophily
yellowish haze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2007   #29
yellowish haze's Avatar
yellowish haze
Grimscribe
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,261
Quotes: 0
Points: 59,678, Level: 100 Points: 59,678, Level: 100 Points: 59,678, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 17% Activity: 17% Activity: 17%
Re: The Launch of Megazanthus Press

BTW, I just ordered the Black Book of Horror, which will soon become my first anthology with a story (in fact two) by Weirdmonger in it!

"In my imagination, I have a small apartment in a small town where I live alone and gaze through a window at a wintry landscape." -- TL
Confusio Linguarum - visionary literature, translingualism & bibliophily
yellowish haze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2007   #30
yellowish haze's Avatar
yellowish haze
Grimscribe
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,261
Quotes: 0
Points: 59,678, Level: 100 Points: 59,678, Level: 100 Points: 59,678, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 17% Activity: 17% Activity: 17%
Re: The Launch of Megazanthus Press

http://yellowishhaze.blogspot.com/20...mpetition.html

Here are my lucky guesses.

"In my imagination, I have a small apartment in a small town where I live alone and gaze through a window at a wintry landscape." -- TL
Confusio Linguarum - visionary literature, translingualism & bibliophily
yellowish haze is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
launch, megazanthus, press
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Thou Shalt Not virtual book launch Stu Stuart Young 3 04-03-2016 03:37 AM
The InkerMen Press yellowish haze Other News 58 11-23-2013 07:04 AM
Ghost Story Press & Ash tree press books on ebay cw67q Items Available 4 11-14-2013 11:44 AM
Nightjar Press yellowish haze Other News 13 08-13-2010 05:15 AM
Elysium Press MadsPLP Other News 2 02-04-2009 04:55 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:18 AM.



Style Based on SONGS OF A DEAD DREAMER as Published by Silver Scarab Press
Design and Artwork by Harry Morris
Emulated in Hell by Dr. Bantham
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Template-Modifications by TMS