THE NIGHTMARE NETWORK
Go Back   THE NIGHTMARE NETWORK > Miscellanea > Members > Personal
Home Forums Content Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Contagion Members Media Diversion Info Register
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes Translate
Old 03-22-2008   #1
bendk's Avatar
bendk
Grimscribe
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,604
Quotes: 1
Points: 186,083, Level: 100 Points: 186,083, Level: 100 Points: 186,083, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 21% Activity: 21% Activity: 21%
Topic Nominated I Just Finished Reading...

I like to see what other people are reading, so I thought I would start this thread in hopes that others would share some thoughts on other books and authors out there that they have read recently. In the past couple weeks, I have read two novels:

The Woman in the Dunes by Kobo Abe. I enjoyed this novel very much. This book is usually high up on those "Best Existentialist Novels" lists. It was also made into a famous movie. Abe was influenced by Kafka, which is a plus for me, as well. It is about an entomologist that goes looking for a beetle in a remote area and meets with a few unforeseen complications.

Head Injuries by Conrad Williams. I remember someone mentioning this book on the Grimmest Horror thread. It is pretty bleak stuff. It is about a group of friends experiencing some weird visions. They get together to try to figure out why. This novel was highly praised by Ramsey Campbell. I liked it. I have enjoyed some of his short stories more, though. This is a contemporary horror author that I am going to read more of.
bendk is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanks From:
Dr. Bantham (07-10-2008)
Old 03-22-2008   #2
Psycho Cat's Avatar
Psycho Cat
Mannikin
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 8
Quotes: 0
Points: 4,905, Level: 47 Points: 4,905, Level: 47 Points: 4,905, Level: 47
Level up: 78% Level up: 78% Level up: 78%
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: I Just Finished Reading...

Today I finished American Psycho by Brett Easton Ellis. This novel is a first person narrative about the life of a wall street professional in Manhattan who also happens to be a maniacal serial killer. As good as the film adaptation was, it really pales in comparison to the book. I was really shocked at the brutality of the murders in this book! The images conjured by Ellis describing the sick homicidal fantasies acted out anti-hero Pat Bateman really stick with you. I honestly wanted to put down the book, at times...it is so disgustingly over-the-top graphic.

Next up: Word Virus: the William S. Burroughs reader.

"There is an idea of a Patrick Bateman; some kind of abstraction. But there is no real me: only an entity, something illusory. And though I can hide my cold gaze, and you can shake my hand and feel flesh gripping yours and maybe you can even sense our lifestyles are probably comparable... I simply am not there."
Psycho Cat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2008   #3
unknown's Avatar
unknown
Grimscribe
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 563
Quotes: 0
Points: 21,427, Level: 100 Points: 21,427, Level: 100 Points: 21,427, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Send a message via AIM to unknown
Re: I Just Finished Reading...

American Psycho is probably one of the greatest American novels written within the past 30 years. The meticulousness...everything. It's basically a "how-to" book on character development. absolutely ridiculously amazing

there is no stronger drug than reality

yog-sothoth
unknown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2008   #4
yellowish haze's Avatar
yellowish haze
Grimscribe
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,254
Quotes: 0
Points: 57,702, Level: 100 Points: 57,702, Level: 100 Points: 57,702, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: I Just Finished Reading...

Great topic, bendk!

Just finished reading No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy. I'm glad I found some time to dip into it so as to be able to compare it with the film. I have to confess that I am one of those persons who wasn't entirely satisfied with the adaptation. I would need to go into details and spoilers if I wanted to explain my point. So, all I want to say is read the book before watching the film!

Next: My Soul to Keep by Tananarive Due. It was nominated for a Stoker Award in 1998. It'll be the second time that I'm trying to delve in to it - my last attempt was thwarted by lack of time.

"In my imagination, I have a small apartment in a small town where I live alone and gaze through a window at a wintry landscape." -- TL
Confusio Linguarum - visionary literature, translingualism & bibliophily
yellowish haze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2008   #5
Sticherbeast
Mannikin
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 5
Quotes: 0
Points: 5,990, Level: 53 Points: 5,990, Level: 53 Points: 5,990, Level: 53
Level up: 20% Level up: 20% Level up: 20%
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: I Just Finished Reading...

The final volume of the Sinister Forces trilogy by Peter Levenda. I posted a summary elsewhere, but it really is quite something: a three-volume history of mind control and the occult in America, as it relates even beyond the simple cloak-and-dagger. Hot stuff.

Also, Fletcher Hanks' I Shall Destroy All Civilized Planets, which is a bat#### collection of old comic books about a delirious superhero battling equally delirious supervillains.

I've also been reading the short stories of Alfred Bester, Theodore Sturgeon, Philip K. Dick, and Stanislaw Lem, to distract myself from my studies, which have lately been about the Politics of Administrative Law. There's something relaxing about immersing oneself in political nastiness and the superficial appearance of order, thence to escape to philosophical whimsy.
Sticherbeast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2008   #6
bendk's Avatar
bendk
Grimscribe
Threadstarter
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,604
Quotes: 1
Points: 186,083, Level: 100 Points: 186,083, Level: 100 Points: 186,083, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 21% Activity: 21% Activity: 21%
Re: I Just Finished Reading...

My girlfriend warned me off of American Psycho. She said it went into too much boring detail about consumer products or something like that. Its been a while. I remember bidding on a British hardcover edition that had a really cool cover. I lost, of course. Shallow pockets. But that was years ago when it was just out, so I may try again.

I haven't read McCarthy's No Country for Old Men, but I did see the movie. I liked the film, but I obviously can't compare the two. I am always in a quandary as to which to do first: read the novel or see the movie. My experience has led me to believe that for the movie to stand a chance, it should be viewed first. But then that may spoil the novel. Who knows? I think that each should be judged separately, if possible. The movie did fine at the Oscars. I don't know if this counts as "reading" but I did listen to an unabridged recording of his book The Road. This is new territory for McCarthy. It is a post-apocalyptic novel. I liked it a lot. It has one thing in common with the rest of his work - it is bleak as hell.

I still haven't read much Burroughs.

Sinister Forces trilogy by Peter Levenda sounds interesting. It sounds like something that might have appealed to the late conspiracy theorist, John Rev. R.I.P. I read a book years ago (I don't think I ever finished it) called Imperium by Francis Parker Yokey. It was also a massive conspiracy-type book, though nowhere near 2,000 pages. I think that dealt more with politics and race.

Last edited by bendk; 03-24-2008 at 02:00 PM..
bendk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2008   #7
gveranon's Avatar
gveranon
Grimscribe
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,116
Quotes: 0
Points: 27,531, Level: 100 Points: 27,531, Level: 100 Points: 27,531, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: I Just Finished Reading...

Plowing the Dark, by Richard Powers. Not a Ligottian writer. At the bottom of Powers's vision is a recognition of the icy bleakness of things, but on top of that are layers of sentimental humanism, political idealism, and fascination with science and technology. I share the fascination with science and technology but find the mushy sentimentalism and aching political idealism to be dubious. However, these provide much of the emotional fuel for his plots; and since I am quite in thrall to this novel and to another of his novels, The Gold Bug Variations, I'm probably responding to this stuff more than I'd like to admit. What I like best about these two novels is their prose style, which could be called "geek baroque." The intellectual brilliance is couched in a knotty, allusive, aphoristic, polysyllabic style. Some of his other novels are written in a flatter, plainer style that (for me at least) isn't as effective. There is a famous science fiction story from the 1950s by Tom Godwin called "The Cold Equations." Richard Powers writes about the cold equations and our desperate projects to re-engineer them.

The Strange Case of Edward Gorey, by Alexander Theroux. A character portrait of the writer/illustrator Edward Gorey by the novelist Alexander Theroux, who knew Gorey personally. I have long been amused and intrigued by Edward Gorey's works but now have a new appreciation for them after reading about the odd and unique man who dreamed them up. I really envy Gorey's solitary, independent, stubbornly-eccentric lifestyle. Me? I go to work every day. A good book to peruse along with this one is Elephant House, which contains photographs of Gorey's run-down, two-story house taken a few days after his death in 2000. The house as he left it was very cluttered, with thousands of books, old furniture, many strange objets d'art, a hidden room, and a few complacent cats. Again, I feel envy (although I could do without the cats). These are interesting books to look at for anyone who is plotting a later-in-life retreat into solitude, aestheticism, and misanthropy. Sounds like a plan.

Last edited by gveranon; 03-23-2008 at 10:36 PM..
gveranon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2008   #8
Viva June's Avatar
Viva June
Mystic
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 232
Quotes: 0
Points: 7,493, Level: 60 Points: 7,493, Level: 60 Points: 7,493, Level: 60
Level up: 72% Level up: 72% Level up: 72%
Activity: 7% Activity: 7% Activity: 7%
Re: I Just Finished Reading...

Quote Originally Posted by gveranon View Post
The Strange Case of Edward Gorey, by Alexander Theroux.
Alexander Theroux seems to be an interesting writer. I know Darconville's Cat is often praised, but what about the others?

I just finished Kundskabens Bog (The Book of Knowledge) by Ernesto Dalgas. It was the last book he wrote before killing himself, putting it together from various essays and notes in the summer of 1899. A philosophical suicide note, essentially, and a summation of his attempt to reconcile scientific positivism and religious belief. The argument is not very good, however, which makes it all rather sad.
Viva June is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2008   #9
gveranon's Avatar
gveranon
Grimscribe
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,116
Quotes: 0
Points: 27,531, Level: 100 Points: 27,531, Level: 100 Points: 27,531, Level: 100
Level up: 0% Level up: 0% Level up: 0%
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: I Just Finished Reading...

Quote Originally Posted by Viva June View Post
Alexander Theroux seems to be an interesting writer. I know Darconville's Cat is often praised, but what about the others?
I haven't read any of Alexander Theroux's other books. I know that he has a reputation for using a lot of arcane words, as Nabokov does. There is certainly an expansive vocabulary on display in The Strange Case of Edward Gorey. I had seen most of the words before but a few were new to me. Asynartesia? Obol? Aposiopesis? Fraticellian?
gveranon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2008   #10
Sticherbeast
Mannikin
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 5
Quotes: 0
Points: 5,990, Level: 53 Points: 5,990, Level: 53 Points: 5,990, Level: 53
Level up: 20% Level up: 20% Level up: 20%
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: I Just Finished Reading...

Quote Originally Posted by bendk View Post
Sinister Forces trilogy by Peter Levenda sounds interesting. It sounds like something that might have appealed to the late conspiracy theorist, John Rev. R.I.P. I read a book years ago (I don't think I ever finished it) called Imperium by Francis Parker Yokey. It was also a massive conspiracy-type book, though nowhere near 2,000 pages. I think that dealt more with politics and race.
How funny - I've just started reading Dreamer of the Day, which is a biography of Francis Parker Yockey! It's quite excellent. Yockey sounds like one of the most elaborate little villains the world has ever seen.
Sticherbeast is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
finished, reading

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Recent Reading Druidic General Discussion 973 3 Days Ago 07:43 AM
Reading and Memory Freyasfire Off Topic 14 03-13-2017 08:16 PM
How to Tell When You're Reading a Gothic Novel qcrisp General Discussion 1 10-14-2015 06:16 PM
Reading Lists qcrisp General Discussion 15 04-20-2014 02:29 AM
Till TG Gets Here, I'm Reading... SwansSoilMe/SwansSaveMe Ligotti News 41 03-31-2008 07:45 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:55 PM.



Style Based on SONGS OF A DEAD DREAMER as Published by Silver Scarab Press
Design and Artwork by Harry Morris
Emulated in Hell by Dr. Bantham
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Template-Modifications by TMS